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Old 03-05-2011, 02:04 PM   #11
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I am partial to brandywine tomatoes myself. The heirloom varieties seem to take longer to bear fruit, at least, that has been my experience. I like the Oxheart as well.
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Old 03-05-2011, 02:32 PM   #12
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Have you ever seen the British TV Series "The Good Neighbors"? It was also called "The Good Life".

They had this cart made out of a roto-tiller, a platform and a bench that they used to drive back and forth to their allotment (same as your garden plot). It looked a lot like this. LOL


Maybe you can get Frank to build you something.
I loved "Good Neighbors" I wish we could find it on DVD. Their gardening exploits were great!
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Old 03-05-2011, 03:07 PM   #13
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I found Italian plum tomatoes to be the best for containers, but you can't do it year after year w/o having some stem end rot (I think that's what it is called). I used a lot of composted manure. There is also a variety actually called "patio tomatoes" bred for that purpose. Considerably larger than a cherry tomato, but nowhere near as large as, say, a big boy. I suspect cherry or grape tomatoes would do well, but the thing is the grocery ones taste pretty good year 'round, so when I grow a tomato, I want it to be larger!
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Old 03-05-2011, 04:49 PM   #14
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I loved "Good Neighbors" I wish we could find it on DVD. Their gardening exploits were great!
Amazon has them. Amazon.com: The good neighbors

You have to buy series 4 separate from series 1-3 but still not a bad price.
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Old 03-05-2011, 04:52 PM   #15
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I use 1/2 of a whiskey barrel for my "container" for tomatoes. I put basil around the plants (I think I put in 2-3 tree). I also have two HUGE "clay" pots. I can get 3 tomato plants in each of those.
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Old 03-05-2011, 04:54 PM   #16
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It is 'blossom end rot'--the bottom of the tomato turns black. It has to do with how the plant takes up calcium. Adding some lime, and making sure moisture levels are consistent will help with that. Mulch helps keep moisture in, both in a container or in the garden.
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Old 03-05-2011, 07:47 PM   #17
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Amazon has them. Amazon.com: The good neighbors

You have to buy series 4 separate from series 1-3 but still not a bad price.
Thank you, it's been a while since I looked for them. They will be mine, soon. One of our most favorite shows, ever!
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Old 03-05-2011, 08:51 PM   #18
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I found Italian plum tomatoes to be the best for containers, but you can't do it year after year w/o having some stem end rot (I think that's what it is called).

...

I don't understand. Don't you put new plants every year? Don't you do something to freshen the soil?
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Old 03-06-2011, 06:33 AM   #19
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He--, yes, new plants every year. Even in Florida and Hawaii a tomato plant is only seasonal! And, yes, I did amend the soil, although I didn't try the lime thing. Instead I just rotated crops and grew peppers in those pots, cut a plot out of the yard and grow my tomatoes in the ground now.
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Old 03-06-2011, 07:59 AM   #20
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It is 'blossom end rot'--the bottom of the tomato turns black. It has to do with how the plant takes up calcium. Adding some lime, and making sure moisture levels are consistent will help with that. Mulch helps keep moisture in, both in a container or in the garden.
Save and wash out egg shells, then crush them up and work them into the top few inches of the soil in the pot. Works great.
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