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Old 11-18-2018, 06:42 PM   #1
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Do you grow your own herbs

I'm at the other end of the world to most here. We don't have lotsa critters you have so gardens grow good here. We have Italian and plain parsley, oregano,thyme, rosemary,sage,basil and cilantro or as we say coriander. We dried a whole heap 3 weeks ago. Yesterday we processed and put into containers. I use a lot of oregano cilantro and basil.
What do you grow??

Russ

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Old 11-18-2018, 06:47 PM   #2
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And chives. They come up every spring whether they are watered or weeded or not, through snowy winters, rain, sleet, hail, sun and cold. Then I cut them off and dry them, then they grow back again, and again!



And garlic which is a vegetable or an herb or something inbetween.
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Old 11-18-2018, 06:55 PM   #3
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I grow all the ones you do Rascal. Plus rosemary and mint in pots. Treat them as annuals as they do not overwinter here. I grew marjoram as I like to add to soups. Harvested and dried the herbs as they were ready. Made basil pesto and froze quite a bit of that. I buy fresh parsley and cilantro in the winter. I froze coarse chopped rosemary in olive oil and froze in a freezer bag. Have yet to see how that works, but should be pretty good in cooked dishes. Just need to lob off however much from that popsicle. I found a stray catnip seedling elsewhere in the garden and transplanted to the herb garden. My cat found that as well she should.
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Old 11-18-2018, 07:00 PM   #4
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I used to grow a whole herb garden, but we've got a place now where they are so inexpensive that it's really not worth it anymore, so I pretty much just grow basil now since that's the only thing I use in large quantities.
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Old 11-18-2018, 07:06 PM   #5
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Wife's Herbs

We live in the extreme climate of the Mohave (or Mojave!) Desert. Doesn't mean nothing grows here, but some things just don't do well. My wife has year-round Basil, two types, and Rosemary growing out back. She starts tomato plants before Spring. Our orange tree, only 5 years old, has quite a few oranges this year; I'll be picking them in about a month!

In the Phoenix area, they plant hundreds of acres of melons in Winter, harvest them around February, then turn the ground for Cotton, which requires the rest of the year to mature.
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Old 11-18-2018, 07:07 PM   #6
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I have an ongoing supply of chives, thyme, various mints and oregano, and often have sage, basil, dill, and rosemary, though my rosemary will die off as it's too cool here for its liking.
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Old 11-18-2018, 07:26 PM   #7
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Id add Bay leaf to the list.
Bay leaf plant, and rosemary usually don't survive the winter here, so I treat them as annuals ( I will root some rosemary's over the winter and plant them again in the spring)
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Old 11-18-2018, 07:40 PM   #8
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Wow, so many of you grow as well. The only thing I can't grow all year is basil,and cilantro, we are picking lots of both and freeze. I use those a lot in Indian and Italian cooking so I need a lot in the freezer. Rest just grow and I can pick year round. I also have mint in pots as I make mint sauce and jelly. We eat a lot of lamb down under.

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Old 11-18-2018, 07:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
I used to gbbrow a whole herb garden, but we've got a place now where they are so inexpensive that it's really not worth it anymore, so I pretty much just grow basil now since that's the only thing I use in large quantities.
Herbs aren't cheap here, and I use a lot so hence the herb garden, I'd show a pic but it's piddling down outside. We buy basil and cilantro plants from a nursery then harvest as much as we can for the winter.

Russ
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Old 11-18-2018, 08:03 PM   #10
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I have a friend that started to grow the crocuses that produce stamens that are saffron! I think that is really cool. They plant in the late summer and they bloom in the fall, then you have to pick the stamens. That would be so fun!



I grow a medicinal plant, the roots are tinctured for pain relief, that was a project my husband and I worked on for the past couple of years. It was fun and it worked for us.
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