"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Culinary Gardener
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-11-2019, 09:30 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,521
Garden is in and scapes are getting cut

We are 4b and 5a, just got the garden in and we are cutting scapes.



We decided to use landscape fabric to keep down the weeds, plus straw, helps to mulch. We have 2 raised gardens, one for lettuces and salads, and one for strawberries, then 3 potentially no till, weren't tilled this year (for once), making over 2000 square feet of room to grow food.


The potatoes are a foot high, as well as the tomatoes. Things are lookin' good. The spring in WI has been pretty beautiful.


People in the southern states are already harvesting the dreaded zucchinis. Woo hoo.



How are your gardens growing?
__________________

__________________
https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/foods-avoid/big-fat-myths
Check out NutritionFacts.org for the latest in nutrition research.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2019, 10:42 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,082
With all the rain we have had, my garden is doing great.

My herbs look great. Nice big basil leaves that taste wonderful. My oregano, rosemary and thyme survived the winter, and took off with the heavy rains. My Italian parsley survived the winter, and is alive, but it is pretty leggy.

I have jalapeños and one poblano that are ready to harvest, but the first harvest is always VERY mild. They are just slightly hotter than a bell pepper. No cayenne peppers, yet. Not sure why.

That's about it for the state of my garden.

CD
__________________

__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2019, 11:32 PM   #3
Sous Chef
 
pepperhead212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Woodbury, NJ
Posts: 539
I have a lot of scapes, but haven't cut any. I sometimes cut them, but years ago I read that waiting for them to grow straight up, and woody, before snipping them, helped the heads store better. So I tested it, and it was right! So what I do is snip some of the scapes from my Estonian reds, since that doesn't store very well, and just use that variety first. I forget the numbers of each that I have, but 4 varieties with a total of 172 (minus less than 10 no shows), and I don't need that many scapes!

Besides the garlic, and all those greens, I have some succession planted onion sets, for scallions, and have several dozen, of increasing sizes. I've been using a number of those, in dishes using those Asian greens.

Most things are ahead of schedule, with tomatoes, tomatillos, and peppers; about average for the rest. I got my first full sized green Superchilis (always my earliest) on 6-7, but I found some Thai Vesuvius a couple days later, and a Jalafuego and Longfellow today, when I uncovered the 3 protected SIPs (varieties that get pepper maggots). Those covered ones are growing like crazy, since it is slightly warmer under that cover, and hot peppers love heat!
First peppers! Superchilis, 6-7 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Thai Vesuvius, 6-9 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Longhorn pepper, 6-11 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Does anyone here grow bottle gourds? I grew them for the first time last year, as a sub for summer squash (which I can't grow due to squash vine borer), and I got more than I could use from 2 vines! So this year I planted one, on 5-1, and I'll plant another around 6-20, to get them later on. The first vine is growing more than 6" a day, and there are now 4 side shoots on it, like on my butternut! And another thing harvestable from these is the tendrils, when you have so many vines. You can't see all of the vines on this, you see what I mean:
Bottle gourd, with 5 vines growing, 6-11 by pepperhead212, on Flickr
__________________
Dave
pepperhead212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2019, 07:18 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,970
I also have a decent amount of scapes which will be picked over the course of the next few days ( as needed)

Its been a wet spring ( and on hhe cooler side). Only the past few weeks has the heat been ramping up, so now things are starting to kick in.

Garlic, onions, string beans, potatoes and tomatillos seam to be thriving.
Tomatoes (are average or above average depending on the variety.

Peppers and okra average.

Eggplants , for whatever reason, I never have luck with ( except for one year, and I dont know what I did different that year to warrant a good year). The Japanese variety looks nice and healthy, but the others just dont look happy.

Chard , for whatever reason, was a disaster ( the seeds that were directly sown in the ground. Noticing this, I quickly started another batch in isolated cells with potting soil, and they look much better. I ll probably get them out today.

Spaghetti squash ( which kinda plant themselves from the compost) doing very well

Zucchini and yellow squash doing well, but only female flowers at this point. Im hoping to find at least one male flower so I can get my bee costume on and pollinate the others.

Carrots look good, beets not so good .

So basically, if I can get some good advice on beets eggplants it would be much appreciated .
larry_stewart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2019, 12:04 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,329
I asked management to provide me with a small gardening spot suitable for a handicap person. Certainly, they told me. Well the planting season is well over and there are plants out in the garden plot that the maintenance folks use every year. But nothing their. The little plots are supposed to be for the residents. But none of them are interested in gardening.

By law of Massachusetts they are required to provide me with any reasonable and legal request. All I asked for were a couple of five gallon buckets that I can reach easily when I bend over in my chair. If I am able to pick up stuff from the floor in my home, I can reach the top of a five gallon bucket. Just fill the bottom with rocks, then dirt. I will even provide them with one of the buckets. But the rest is up to them. And I will need a key to the locks on the gate. The maintenance folks just climb over the fence. I had wanted to plant some tomatoes and cukes. Too late in the season now.

Do I have to bring a legal suit against them?
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2019, 12:16 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,521
Larry, I only grew eggplant about 3 years ago. They were big plants and only gave us about 7 egg plants, which were yummy but nearly all at once. I'm sure we treated them like the tomatoes, just water and sunshine, maybe a little milorganite and epsom salt. But especially about eggplants, I don't know anything.


Your bee costume, lol. Last year hubs and I went out with paint brushes (small ones-one inch wides), 2 each. We didn't want to cross pollinate the two types of tomatoes planted in different areas. We brushed across all the blossoms, thousands of them. We had such a bumper crop of tomatoes last year, 100 quarts of thick sauce, ketchup, salsa, and we ate them like they were going out of style. We forgot our bee costumes.



Pepper--you must be 3 weeks or so ahead of us in weather. Those pepper plants look good.
__________________
https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/foods-avoid/big-fat-myths
Check out NutritionFacts.org for the latest in nutrition research.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2019, 12:34 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,970
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Larry, I only grew eggplant about 3 years ago. They were big plants and only gave us about 7 egg plants, which were yummy but nearly all at once. I'm sure we treated them like the tomatoes, just water and sunshine, maybe a little milorganite and epsom salt. But especially about eggplants, I don't know anything.
Eggplants are the only thing I dont have consistency with. I read up on them all winter. I think Im doing everything right, and they just have their minds already made up.
larry_stewart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2019, 12:50 AM   #8
Sous Chef
 
pepperhead212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Woodbury, NJ
Posts: 539
Larry, Blissful, I love eggplant, and through the years I've grown almost 40 varieties, with only 3 keepers! The ones in bold are the ones I grow every year - Hari (a long green Indian variety), Ichiban (a black Japanese variety), and Neon (a purple, in between sized variety). Ichiban has been around since the 80s, when I got it at a local nursery, that started growing unusual variety (and before I started everything from seed!), and is the first variety to flower for me every season, though it is not resistant to heat, as is Hari, which has also grown close to 7' for me, and produced through the heat of some of the worst summers. Neon is almost as heat resistant as Hari, but not quite, and like hari, is also very productive, and not at all bitter, even if it gets seedy. Many of these varieties dropped their blossoms in mid 90s, and up, as many tomatoes do. I expected some of them to be heat resistant, since they are from the tropics, but it didn't happen. And many simply did not produce much, right next to others that I had good luck with.

One drawback I had with eggplants way back was when I was growing potatoes, and the bugs infesting the potatoes - one of the potato beetles - totally wiped out the eggplants, to a netting of their leaves. Yet the potatoes were barely affected. I never grew potatoes again - I like eggplants much more (as you can tell!).

Have you ever grown these, or anything else, in sub-irrigated planters? Earthbox is the well known brand name, though HD and Lowe's have their own now, they have become so popular. The ones I grow the EPs in are homemade, from 18 gal Rubbermaid tubs. I have harvested so many eggplants the last few years from 6 plants in these that I reduced it to 4 this season!

Here are all of the varieties I have tried. This season, the Hari seeds didn't germinate well, so I had to buy some plants. All they had were Ichiban (which I had, with Neon) and Indian, so I tried the Indian, whatever it is!

Here are the plants, so far. As always, the Ichiban are flowering first; the Neons have some buds, but not open yet. The Indians have no buds yet.
Neon eggplants on L, Ichiban on R. 6-12 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Indian eggplants, 6-12 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Unfortunately, Neon is not available any longer. Even though the "replacement" for it has the same photo, it's not the same! They did that with Neon, and Ichiban back in the 90s, but fortunately, the seeds kept until they showed up about 5 years later, on ebay. I'll just keep looking...

Here are all of those varieties I've tried, in case you want any info on them.

Andaz
Apple Green
Aswad
Bambino
Bangladeshi Long
Bijli
Black Beauty
Casper
Comprido Verde (S. aethiopicum)
Cambodian Green
Dancer
Dark Green Thai
Fairy Tale
Green Goddess
Hansel
Hari
Ichiban

"Indian" EP
Kermit Thai
Little Fingers
Louisiana Long Green
Machiaw
Malaysian Pink
Malaysian Red
Mangan
Moneymaker
[I]Neon[I]
Orient Express
Osterei White
Ping Tung Long
Rosa Bianca
Rosita
Round Mauve
Shiva
Snowy White
Thai Long Green
Thai Long Purple
Thai Round Purple
Turkish Red (S. aetheopicum)
__________________
Dave
pepperhead212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2019, 01:07 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,329
I love eggplant Parm. in fact I had it every day last week. And I will be having even more tomorrow. My kids know what I will eat.

So if any of you eggplant farmers have a plethora of eggplant you can send them to me. I will even pay for the postage.

My problem is that every time I buy eggplant for eggplant Parm, I eat the slices as soon as they are cool enough after they come out of the frying pan. The slices don't even get a chance to see any cheese on them.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2019, 07:50 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,521
Pepper-you have some nice eggplants and lots of experience in those. Very nice and interesting. You've tried so many varieties. That's amazing.
I hope you get a good harvest again this year.
__________________

__________________
https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/foods-avoid/big-fat-myths
Check out NutritionFacts.org for the latest in nutrition research.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.