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Old 04-25-2008, 02:06 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by spryte View Post
Green sprout up or down?
In deference to my young cousins who are students at Texas A&M - I will NOT tell the "Green Side Up" joke ...

But yeah - green side up!
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Old 04-25-2008, 08:27 AM   #22
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This is a very helpful post. Thanks for starting it, Spryte. I planted my onions and (second-year) asparagus this week, so I might as well pop in some garlic with it. They'll probably all be ready at the same time! And we'll have roasted asparagus and onions with garlic mmmm.

One question- Do I peel the cloves before planting, or leave the skin on? Does it even matter?
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Old 04-25-2008, 08:49 AM   #23
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YUM!

I'm not sure if someone posted it here... or if it was in one of the links... leave the paper/skin on... but it's not that big a deal if it comes off. =)
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Old 04-25-2008, 08:58 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by JillBurgh View Post
This is a very helpful post. Thanks for starting it, Spryte. I planted my onions and (second-year) asparagus this week, so I might as well pop in some garlic with it. They'll probably all be ready at the same time! And we'll have roasted asparagus and onions with garlic mmmm.

One question- Do I peel the cloves before planting, or leave the skin on? Does it even matter?
I'm not following your logic on planting your asparagus and garlic and the same time and having them ready at the same time. When do you expect them to be ready?

Yes, you leave the skin on each clove of garlic.
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Old 04-25-2008, 12:35 PM   #25
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I'm not following your logic on planting your asparagus and garlic and the same time and having them ready at the same time. When do you expect them to be ready?

Yes, you leave the skin on each clove of garlic.
Well, the asparagus plants were a gift from a friend. She said that they are two years old and that we should expect to get stalks this year. I expected that I could harvest the asparagus late this summer? Am I wrong?
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Old 04-25-2008, 01:20 PM   #26
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Am I wrong?

I think so, from my understanding. If you have just recently planted 2 year old crowns, you can take a light harvest next spring and full harvests after that. Asparagus is a spring harvested vegetable. You harvest them when they first start popping up each spring. Here in southern Ohio, my asparagus just started coming up last week. And I am working with a new bed that has one, two and three year old crowns. I am not touching the two year old crowns, even though they look enormous. It will weaken the plants to harvest from the two year old crowns. They need this time to grow and establish themselves in order to produce for the next 20+ years. By late summer, they should be tall ferns, nothing you would be tempted to harvest to eat.

I am only relating what I have read and I am following the recommendations on my new (and old) asparagus bed. I have not tried to harvest two year old plants on either my new or old bed. My old bed lasted 22 years so the recommendations do seem prudent. Good luck, you are lucky to have these asparagus plants!
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Old 04-25-2008, 01:23 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
In deference to my young cousins who are students at Texas A&M - I will NOT tell the "Green Side Up" joke ...

But yeah - green side up!
uummm, gonna let us in on the joke?
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Old 04-25-2008, 01:53 PM   #28
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I even cultivate "wild" garlic.

If I see some anywhere, I dig it up and take it home. I plant it and ever year I have more. I only dig what I can use and make sure I take a little here and here in the bed evenly. The rest I just let grow.

Wild garlic has a stronger, and I think better flavor than cultivated garlic. My family and friends like it better than store garlic.
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Old 04-25-2008, 03:27 PM   #29
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I even cultivate "wild" garlic.

If I see some anywhere, I dig it up and take it home. I plant it and ever year I have more. I only dig what I can use and make sure I take a little here and here in the bed evenly. The rest I just let grow.

Wild garlic has a stronger, and I think better flavor than cultivated garlic. My family and friends like it better than store garlic.
This post reminded me that there are a whole lot more varities of garlic than "store bought" garlic.. If store bought is all you have ever had, you are in for a treat!

Garlic isn't just garlic, there are many different kinds of garlic and they're almost all different in size, color, shape, taste, number of cloves per bulb, pungency and storability. Most Americans aren't aware of the many kinds since they seldom see more than one kind in the local supermarket. There are said to be over 600 cultivated sub-varieties of garlic in the world, although most of them may be selections of only a handful of basic types that have been grown widely and developed their own characteristics over the centuries as local growing conditions changed.

Botanists classify all true garlics under the species
Allium Sativum. There are two subspecies; Ophioscorodon , or hard-necked garlics (Ophios for short) and Sativum , or soft-necked garlics. The hard-necked garlics were the original garlics and the soft-necked ones were developed or cultivated over the centuries by growers from the original hard-necks through a process of selection.


the link...
An Overview of the five varieties and 17 sub-varieties of Garlic
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Old 04-25-2008, 03:41 PM   #30
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Very interesting site!!
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