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Old 09-10-2008, 02:03 PM   #1
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Horseradish, how to control?

I like horse radish, so decided to plant my own... bought a big "root" from the grocery and put it in a pot, now it's growing..

now I just read somewhere, don't put it in your garden as it will "take over"..
is that true? do I need to just keep it in a large pot?... I know that Mint will take over here as we rareley get "hard freezes" here...

Thanks, Eric Austin Tx..zone 8

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Old 09-10-2008, 02:06 PM   #2
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I was just reading about that last week becasue I want to plant some for next year.....
My book said to either keep it in a pot on the patio or put the pot underground if you want the horseradish in the garden....
Or plant it somewhere it can roam where it wants to.
I'm gong with option #3 and putting it away from everything at the back of my property.
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Old 09-12-2008, 11:44 AM   #3
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I've been wanting to plant it for a while, but never really got into it seriously. So what you saying is it will start growing if I just put into a pot?
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Old 09-12-2008, 12:21 PM   #4
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You'll need a root barrier. Other plants like bamboo and mint require them too or they will take over the area in no time.

Planting in a larger pot is the easiest. If you want to train it to grow in a selected area then you'll need to install a root barrier. They can be made from plastic or even metal flashing.
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Old 09-12-2008, 03:11 PM   #5
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Horseradish doesn't spread as rampantly as bamboo or mint, but it does slowly spread. Plus, it's difficult to eradicate because when you harvest those long tap roots, even the tiniest bit left behind will create a new plant. If harvested regularly though, it can be kept in bounds. My father had a small clump that didn't stray far over many years - but he made a point of harvesting it frequently.
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Old 09-29-2010, 03:03 AM   #6
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I dont think so that its true.....its just dont spread so frequently...
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
My father had a small clump that didn't stray far over many years - but he made a point of harvesting it frequently.
I have (English) horseradish here in France as it helps control the Doryphores (Colorado Beetle). I have it in large pots scattered around all over the place. Trouble is I'm not sure how to harvest, store and use it so I've just left it. Any pointers as to what to do with it?

Cheers
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Old 09-30-2010, 05:52 AM   #8
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The only way is to dig the roots up, back-breaking work I know. But horseradish roots can be tamed if the plant is grown on top of a contained, one metre high (at least) dung heap that underneath, has a pond liner sheet that would stop those terrible roots from burrowing deeper in the Earth's crust.

By growing horseradish on a tall mound, at least you can access its roots far more easily.

A tip when grating horseradish roots, to avoid sore stinging eyes wear a pair of swimming goggles. Lol you might look weird, but you certainly don't get tear-streamed eyes. I ever wear 'goggles when peeling onions. They're excellent. :)
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Old 09-30-2010, 05:59 AM   #9
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Ouch!
Good job my roots are in large pots.

Thanks for the tip about wearing googles. I wear glasses so don't have to many probs peeling onions but I think h/radish is more pungent

Cheers
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Old 10-01-2010, 01:58 PM   #10
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Horseradish is more pungent especially when grated. I prefer pulsing the narrow roots in the Magimix, but the devils still have to be peeled. Moon Flower's idea of using goggles is a goodun.
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