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Old 04-22-2018, 12:45 PM   #1
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Horseradish- I want to plant it.

I would love to grow this. Do I need to get seeds or plant some sort of root. I have looked on the internet including amazon and ebay (UK). If anyone knows of some supplier I would be grateful.

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Old 04-22-2018, 01:03 PM   #2
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Hi, I grew some from pieces of root of horseradish I bought at the grocery store. It wasn't easy to find whole horseradish here but we found some, planted 3 pieces and prepared the rest, grinding, salting, vinegar, then refrigerating and freezing.

It took a couple years to produce, and not too much, but others find it invasive. The leaves are huge, a foot or so tall, but like radish leaves, they smell decidedly like horseradish.
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Old 04-22-2018, 01:21 PM   #3
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We also grew from a peice, we had horseraddish the next year and it took over the patch we had given it, we where never out of horseraddish.
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Old 04-22-2018, 09:29 PM   #4
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Sounds like you might want to plant it in a pot, so you can keep it contained.
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Old 04-23-2018, 02:07 AM   #5
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But if you plant it in a pot it has to be 1 meter deep or the root wont grow properly.
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:36 AM   #6
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Perhaps plant it down the side of the house somewhere unobtrusive. I have a plant, was here when I moved in. It was 8 years before I even knew what it was. It is big, it has grown, perhaps it is where it is (north side) but I do not find it invasive.

when I did some research on it, read that you should basically start it anew every year. Dig up a good portion, do your thing with it and replant the rest of the root. It was my understanding that once it had grown the roots would not be as tasty/good as fresh root.

So if you divide and replant each year, perhaps your plant would not become so gigantic?

I like horseradish but not so much as to go thru the hassles of preserving it.

I think I still have the articles I looked up, I will see if I can find them and refresh my memory.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:56 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
But if you plant it in a pot it has to be 1 meter deep or the root wont grow properly.
Pots that deep exist. Life is full of trade-offs

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...re-in-pots.htm
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:51 AM   #8
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My dad would dig up horseradish roots that were from generations old plants on some of his farms. Those roots in the blender made for some potent, eye-watering fumes, but a tasty sauce. Maybe ask a farmer for a chunk of root to plant.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:55 AM   #9
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We've grown leeks and beets in big pots. I check the big box store's garden centers and buy those large (and fairly expensive) pots when they put them on clearance when I need them. Got 2 for less than the normal price of 1 that way once.

Dragon was right, the article I found stated first-year roots are more pungent and they called for a pot depth of at least 30 inches, so not quite a meter. The leaves are also edible and supposedly have a similar taste to arugula.

https://www.thespruce.com/growing-ho...garden-1403461
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:05 AM   #10
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My father planted some pieces last spring. The result was a very thin root, much thinner than a young carrot. But I was told that we should have left the roots in and that horse radish will produce on the second year.
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