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Old 07-10-2008, 03:41 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie
Is it just me (I have sandy soil) or does having hilled rows seem to keep the soil around the plant drier?
You're quiet right Suzi, but by doing it like everybody says you have the benefit of being able to water the plant in the "V" where the soil joins the hill rather than using a spray and wasting water, you don't wash any insecticides off either.
Thanks guys, I was on the wrong track
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Old 07-10-2008, 07:41 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie View Post
Is it just me (I have sandy soil) or does having hilled rows seem to keep the soil around the plant drier?
DH insisted I needed raised rows, I think I have to water more often than I did without.
Everything grew just fine every other year without raised rows.
Miss Suzi....When I prepare my gardens I prep (disk) the area with a tractor...then I "row up" using disk hillers, an implement behind the tractor that creates long rows that are essentially long continuous "hills" These rows act mostly as a guide to lay out the garden...In a small garden spot a piece of string stretched from end to end would accomplish the same thing. Next when I get ready to plant I either use a tiller to till down the row to make a bed for the seed, or either I run planters (behind the tractor) to plant large quanities of an item...corn, or peas. In both instances the rows are mostly flattened back out. This is..in some ways an old school type of "farming"...Today's modern large scale farming (hundreds of acres) of corn, cotton, soybeans, use a "no till' method sometimes. They go into the field and simply just plant it without tilling/disking/prepping the soil first. This helps with erosion control, and it cuts out a lot of labor and fuel cost. Finally to answer your question...Yes..if your rows are left "hilled" up the soil will have a tendency to dry out faster than if the ground was flat. Also, if your soil is sandy, then it will require more frequent watering than soil that is less sandy.
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Old 07-10-2008, 07:51 AM   #13
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But if you are growing potatoes you want to keep them

"hilled" and even increase the hill as they grow. And with leeks you want to start them in the valley and gradually add soil from the hills on either side as the leeks grow.
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:13 AM   #14
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Where you'll be planting in florida Midori, you have sandy soil with good drainage. You'll need to ammend the soil with organic matter, as we discussed acouple of weeks ago. The point of hills is to keep the "fruit" from mildew or rot.
And don't plant seeds or seedling more than 12" apart to allow bees pollination easier travel distance and axcess.
The "hill" method is only used for melons and pumpkins, and potatoes. Not peppers or tomatoes.

But for the life of me, I can't figure out where your going
to put all the stuff you're talking about in these 3 threads in a "raised" home garden you extensively discussed several weeks ago.
How big is this garden going to be? And how many people do you plan to feed?
I salute you're ambition.
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:14 AM   #15
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"hilled" and even increase the hill as they grow. And with leeks you want to start them in the valley and gradually add soil from the hills on either side as the leeks grow.
Correct....pull the dirt to them as they grow...
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Old 07-10-2008, 05:00 PM   #16
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I'm not planning on planting melons, squash, and pumpkins in the garden I'm planning on growing this fall. As for the space, there's a huge yard where I'll be relocating to. I have no intention on growing things such as squash and melons in raised beds. I know they're vining plants and that they take up lots of space; this is precisely why I asked how you make hills. When I said hills, I wasn't referring to a literal hill; to my knowledge that's how they're referred to with gardening. When I say hills, I mean small mounds. Unfortunately with the explanations given, they were way too complicated and confused me even more. All I want to know is, how big in inches should the hills (mounds) be across (horizontally). I am also wondering if I should use portions of fertilizer and topsoil to form these hills. If so, what is the ratio of each to one another that I should use with the topsoil and fertilizer?

One more question I have to ask and that is this. Is it feasible to grow melons, tomatoes, squash (zucchini and pumpkin) in raised beds? If so, how? I'm just asking this for the sake of curiosity more then anything else. As to why I'm requesting this information, it's for future reference.

The only other questions I have are how far apart do you space the seeds when you plant them, and
do you have to put them in any particular shape (circle, square, triangle, etc.). How many seeds should be planted per hill, and how many do you thin them down to when they've germinated.
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Old 07-12-2008, 08:41 PM   #17
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Well, you do make hills when growing potatoes. You plant them in a flat row, but as they grow, you keep pulling the soil up around the stems, where the little potatoes form.
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