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Old 02-19-2012, 07:45 AM   #21
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I do have a patio door that I can use for a light source. A few years ago we grew some peppers (jalapeno, cayenne, and habanero) in long window pots although they were not in windows. When it was nice enough outside we put them outside to grow. It worked rather well. I think I will eventually transplant them to those pots. I will just need to get some fresh soil for those. I like the idea of planting them together.
Also I will certainly need to look into which are annual and which are not.
Perhaps next time I buy fresh herbs from the grocery store I will try using the clippings, Historic Foodie. That should be a fun experiment. It seems as though I will be using different methods (i.e. from clippings, plants and seeds). This is a project I will at least experiment with.
Thanks for everyone's input. I really appreciate it :)
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Old 02-19-2012, 07:53 AM   #22
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Just so you don't get frustrated, MBE, many herbs have notoriously low germination rates. So, for those you start from seed, you might want to over plant to assure getting what you want.

Many herb seeds are very tiny, almost dust like. If you mix them with fine sand, however, it helps to spread the seed more evenly.
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Old 02-19-2012, 08:12 AM   #23
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Just so you don't get frustrated, MBE, many herbs have notoriously low germination rates. So, for those you start from seed, you might want to over plant to assure getting what you want.

Many herb seeds are very tiny, almost dust like. If you mix them with fine sand, however, it helps to spread the seed more evenly.
It is almost like when I planted a garden when I was younger, we would plant a lot more seeds than necessary and weed them out as they grew. I will only plant the ones that are absolutely necessary from seed. All others will be from clippings or plants already thriving :)
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Old 02-19-2012, 08:32 AM   #24
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It is almost like when I planted a garden when I was younger, we would plant a lot more seeds than necessary and weed them out as they grew. I will only plant the ones that are absolutely necessary from seed. All others will be from clippings or plants already thriving :)
Keep us updated! I'm planning on growing sweet basil, oregano and rosemary. I live in Ohio and container gardening seems to be the way to go.

I'm also looking for a really nice pot to grow a bay laurel. Not that I'd use it much, it just looks really cool!
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Old 02-19-2012, 08:37 AM   #25
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This has been a very interesting thread. I'd like some advice on a rosemary plant in my yard, please. I'm in SW FL, with temperate but distinct rainy and dry seasons. I have a rosemary in a dry location - it's about 2 feet high. I moved it a few months ago and it lost nearly all its leaves/needles but has now recovered and the tops are greening up again, even showing a few flowers. But the lower stems are still naked. Should I cut it back close to the ground and let it regrow from there or is that too drastic?
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Old 02-19-2012, 08:52 AM   #26
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I'm curious to know too, tinlizzie. I don't know anything about gardening! I've never actually maintained a garden, even a small one. I hope I don't have the black thumb of death.
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:12 AM   #27
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I'm curious to know too, tinlizzie. I don't know anything about gardening! I've never actually maintained a garden, even a small one. I hope I don't have the black thumb of death.
I can't even get plants to get in my shopping cart...they throw their fronds out and refuse to get in. They know they are going to the "House of Doom." Seeds are defenseless, but if you hold the packet right you can hear them shaking in fear.
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:15 AM   #28
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I can't even get plants to get in my shopping cart...they throw their fronds out and refuse to get in. They know they are going to the "House of Doom." Seeds are defenseless, but if you hold the packet right you can hear them shaking in fear.
I used to think that I had a black thumb until I started to care for a Peace Lily at home. Once I learned how to "read it" when it needs water/sun, etc. It boosted my confidence and now I have a few other plants indoors. Growing herbs and spices is going to be a challenge, but worth it if it works in my favor :)
I say to give it a try and see what happens. The worst thing is that it will die and I will have to go buy them at the grocery store ha ha
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:19 AM   #29
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My Mom has a jungle in her house...I did not inherit that gene, I got all the fun stuff (high blood pressure, heart disease...). What I don't neglect/overprotect, the cats will decide it's good for eating. I kill cactus...
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:23 AM   #30
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This has been a very interesting thread. I'd like some advice on a rosemary plant in my yard, please. I'm in SW FL, with temperate but distinct rainy and dry seasons. I have a rosemary in a dry location - it's about 2 feet high. I moved it a few months ago and it lost nearly all its leaves/needles but has now recovered and the tops are greening up again, even showing a few flowers. But the lower stems are still naked. Should I cut it back close to the ground and let it regrow from there or is that too drastic?
That's kind a tricky one. You could leave it alone and let it recover, but I think it might be permanently affected. A conservative approach is probably best. Leave it alone for now. (You wouldn't want to prune while it's flowering, anyway.) If it recovers and fills out, fine. It's a big plant to be cutting back to the ground, but if it stays bare on the lower parts and just looks bad, I'd do that, but only as the last resort. Rosemary is tough, so you have time to see what happens.
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