"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Culinary Gardener
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-02-2010, 12:44 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,984
Bummer! Well if you enjoy tomatoes and cukes, it's definitely worth the time and effort. And if you do it right, it's not that hard.
__________________

__________________
vagriller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 04:24 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
DaveSoMD's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,038
I think your best bet would be container gardeining or raised beds. Start off small and see if you like it before putting in a large in-ground bed. Be sure the spot you pick will get AT LEAST 8 hours of direct sun, the more the better, but that is a minimum.

Starting seeds takes patience so you might want to buy seedlings your fist year for tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and your herbs. If you want to grow lettuce/spinach/greens then go for the seeds. You can get decent seeds at places like WalMart, Lowes, Home Depot, etc.

You can grow a tomato plant in a 5-gallon bucket or similair sized pot very nicely, same goes for peppers and cucumbers. ( I started out with pots and buckets myself before moving up to raised beds) If you plant a raised bed you might want to consider some wire fencing (chicken wire, etc) to keep out the 4-legged neighbors.
__________________

__________________
DaveSoMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 05:35 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
JamesS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: VA
Posts: 264
Sunlight may be an issue too. As I mentioned, I have a few acres cleared in the middle of a pine forest. The trees are very tall. There are places in the yard that never get direct sunlight. Thankfully, there's a large stretch along the west side that gets lots of light....it also backs up to the largest stretch of woods and consequently has the most tracks in the snow at the moment.

Raised beds sound kind of fun. I was looking at pictures on one of the seed company sites, and they're pretty too. If I don't think the veggie gardening is worthwhile after the first year, my fiance can use them for flower beds.

At this point I'm leaning towards experimenting. I've got a huge deck that's being overrun with honeysuckle, that could hold a lot of containers. It would be a simple matter to put up some arched trellises to hold buckets, and install some beds (with ample security!). Maybe some strawberries too!
__________________
JamesS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 06:20 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
Raised beds sound kind of fun. I was looking at pictures on one of the seed company sites, and they're pretty too. If I don't think the veggie gardening is worthwhile after the first year, my fiance can use them for flower beds.

At this point I'm leaning towards experimenting. I've got a huge deck that's being overrun with honeysuckle, that could hold a lot of containers. It would be a simple matter to put up some arched trellises to hold buckets, and install some beds (with ample security!). Maybe some strawberries too!
Raised beds are possibly the best way to garden. Since you must put all the dirt in, it is very loose, and great for growing veggies. You can mix the soil with peat moss, compost, and whatever other organic materials you like. Also I believe it makes it easier to install fencing around it. I put a 32" high chicken wire fence around it, and it keeps most critters out. I know that deer could easily get their necks over it, but not too many problems with deer in my residential area. And remember deer can jump greater than 6' high, but you only need a fence higher than the lowest of your neighbors fences.
__________________
vagriller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2010, 09:05 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
CookLikeJulia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 479
gardening habit is the best , not just you can eat or consume food through you garden but it also benefits to those who are fun of gardening ... to the women who had a age of 30 plus this activity can really help you , it will straighten your hips and help prevent scoliosis .
__________________
CookLikeJulia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2010, 09:07 AM   #16
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
JamesS, why don't you look at root crops like potatoes, carrots, onions etc? They are less labor intensive and might be more satisfying if you don't like the work of a garden but enjoy the rewards.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2010, 09:26 AM   #17
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
JamesS, why don't you look at root crops like potatoes, carrots, onions etc? They are less labor intensive and might be more satisfying if you don't like the work of a garden but enjoy the rewards.

IMHO if you only grow one thing, grow tomatoes. That is if you like tomatoes! There is nothing better than garden fresh vine ripe tomatoes. Unless of course it is those tomatoes along with garden fresh cukes in a salad! To each his own of course, but when I can get a 10lb bag of spuds for $3 I don't bother. Same thing with corn on the cob. When I can get them 6-8 ears for $1 there's no way I'm going to grow them. It is true though that root crops would be far less work.
__________________
vagriller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2010, 09:37 AM   #18
Senior Cook
 
JamesS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: VA
Posts: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
JamesS, why don't you look at root crops like potatoes, carrots, onions etc? They are less labor intensive and might be more satisfying if you don't like the work of a garden but enjoy the rewards.
I'm looking at this as more of a remedy for the limited produce selection at the only grocery under an hour's drive away. In particular, the only fresh herbs I'm likely to find are parsley and cilantro. While they have tomatoes and peppers, they're very inconsistent. With the tomatoes they're usually hard as a rock, pink and grainy inside with almost no flavor. The peppers run the gamut, although they do lean towards good ones. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, onions, beets, spring onions and the like, they pretty well always have, and they're decent quality.
__________________
JamesS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2010, 10:18 AM   #19
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
I'm looking at this as more of a remedy for the limited produce selection at the only grocery under an hour's drive away. In particular, the only fresh herbs I'm likely to find are parsley and cilantro. While they have tomatoes and peppers, they're very inconsistent. With the tomatoes they're usually hard as a rock, pink and grainy inside with almost no flavor. The peppers run the gamut, although they do lean towards good ones. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, onions, beets, spring onions and the like, they pretty well always have, and they're decent quality.
I believe you can grow herbs fairly easily inside the house in a pot. I've not yet done it though.
__________________
vagriller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2010, 10:35 AM   #20
Senior Cook
 
JamesS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: VA
Posts: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller View Post
I believe you can grow herbs fairly easily inside the house in a pot. I've not yet done it though.
Nothing is done easily in the house with an evil Golden Retriever pup present:
__________________

__________________
JamesS is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.