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Old 02-25-2010, 10:49 AM   #31
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You work in a restaurant though, right?

How large are the spaces in the gridwall? 1" chicken wire is usually recommended to keep out critters like rabbits.
I haven't worked in a kitchen since the late eighties. I'm recently on my first retirement after owning a hobby shop for a couple of decades...hence a basement full of retail fixtures that I've been too lazy to put on Craigslist.

The grid panels are three inch if memory serves. A small rabbit could get through...but it would have to climb to get to the plants. I suspect a raccoon could get in too, but like squirrels they're pretty few and far between out here (but more dedicated climbers). Since the plants will be up high, not only would it have to get into the cage, it would have to climb up it.
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Old 02-25-2010, 10:56 AM   #32
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The grid panels are three inch if memory serves. A small rabbit could get through...but it would have to climb to get to the plants. I suspect a raccoon could get in too, but like squirrels they're pretty few and far between out here (but more dedicated climbers). Since the plants will be up high, not only would it have to get into the cage, it would have to climb up it.
Gotcha! I just looked up the gridwall, and then realized that you would be hanging the containers up where the critters would have to climb (and it would make it easier to maintain. I think that's a great idea! But I wouldn't start off with a 24' long cage if I were you! And didn't you mention a golden retriever? I would think that the dog might keep some critters away.

You must post pics of this setup when you get it done though!
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Old 02-25-2010, 11:23 AM   #33
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24' may be a little aggressive for the first year. That would be room for a dozen or so containers. Really, I imagine three or four tomato plants and an equal amount of peppers would be plenty.

The dogs never go after the wildlife (thankfully). They're both competitive hunting retrievers. Well, Kali, my Lab is anyways. Chase, the Golden is still trained, but since he's epileptic I won't let him swim in the winter.

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Old 02-25-2010, 12:46 PM   #34
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I will try cherry tomatoes this year in the hopes that they don't need as much sun. Anyone know this for sure?
Any that I have grown have required as much sun as regular tomatoes. Sorry about that. There could be a variety that I haven't tried that doesn't need as much though. I typically do sweet one millions. I've done others though.
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:02 AM   #35
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Hi mmh sound so fun of gardening huh well very nice habit which i cant apply but i what i have known
gardening activities potentially provide an outlet for enhanced physical and emotional well-being. Increased physical activity can reduce the risk of some cancers, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and depression Hope i make a garden too ...
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Old 02-26-2010, 07:32 PM   #36
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When we put in a garden, we do think...GROCERIES, fresh ones and we make the best of what works that year.
We fortified the soil with manure and soil and mulch last year, what a great year. We started sheet composting in another garden space for this year too. Then, because we lost so many plants to sand hill cranes, bunnies and deer...once things came up, yum those tender seedlings, we put a temporary fence around the garden. We just stuck sticks around 4 feet tall in the ground around it, and strung some chicken wire around it. That helped immensely.
We overplant in double rows and put cardboard in between the rows, that helps with MOST of the weeds. We started some of our plants from seed in the house.
We had BEANS--still have a lot in the freezer and canned, pea pods, used those in chinese the other night. Tomatoes, peppers--green and hot. Tomatillos, still have frozen base for salsa. BASIL, still have it ground up with olive oil in the freezer to make pesto which is SO good. (I made some the other day, the first day it was SO HOT from garlic, then it mellowed, it's a beautiful thing.)
And we planted a garlic garden in the fall, and it will come to fruit next July, I'm excited to see how it did.
All in all, I'd do it all again. I think the composting makes the soil rich, the plants do better, the fruits of your labor are delicious.
If you can't get into it, then just do the parts you love, if it is tomatoes, then do them well, water and put a mulch around them. Good luck
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Old 02-27-2010, 12:59 PM   #37
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Tomatoes

I don't have much space and say yearly that I would like to grow a few things. We live in the city and I think a few containers would serve well. When looking at tomatoes, I keep gazing at heirloom tomatoes because they look so different and I like to experience different foods. Has anyone had experience with heirloom tomatoes? Are some varieties better than others?

Also other suggestions for cucumbers and other varieties of veggies for containers?

I grow herbs in place of flowers in flower bed in the front yard. It made for a pretty garden last summer.

~Kathleen
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Old 02-27-2010, 04:30 PM   #38
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Heirlooms are great. I grow several kinds in my garden every year. Brandywine is a good tomato to start with and pretty available. The key to container gardening is to be sure to keep them well watered. Also, heriloom tomoatoes are "indeterminant" which means they will grow and grow. You need to be sure to stake them well and if they get too tall pinch them back.

There are bush varieties of cucumbers that do well in containers. Lettuces and spinach also do well in containers, as do bush beans and peppers. If you have large enough containes you can even plant some flowers like marigolds or zinneas in with the veg.
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Old 02-27-2010, 07:41 PM   #39
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I just read in one of my gardening magazines there is a new yellow squash hybrid out this season that is supposed to be prefect for containers. It is called Buckingham.
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Old 02-27-2010, 10:21 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by KathleenA View Post
I don't have much space and say yearly that I would like to grow a few things. We live in the city and I think a few containers would serve well. When looking at tomatoes, I keep gazing at heirloom tomatoes because they look so different and I like to experience different foods. Has anyone had experience with heirloom tomatoes? Are some varieties better than others?

Also other suggestions for cucumbers and other varieties of veggies for containers?

I grow herbs in place of flowers in flower bed in the front yard. It made for a pretty garden last summer.

~Kathleen
Kathleen, I live on 8-1/2 acres, but garden around close to the house..I used a tub with a trellis and grew cucmber which i made some into 24 hour pickle chips...Tomatoes can be hung from the edge of a patio, I had several heirlooms
they are a little fussy but so sweet and good..Grape tomatoes in a 1/2 barrel like the cucumbers..I just bought a cloth planter and will plant gold potatoes in them no need to hill..I even plant basil and herbs in 1/2 barrels, It's easier for me this way and the yeild is great.
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