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Old 06-12-2011, 11:01 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
I once had a package of kidney beans that had been sitting around for years. On a whim, I planted one in an unused pot. It grew into a lovely plant.
If you replanted it outside in the garden, would it be considered a kidney transplant?
I've been known to try these thing too.
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Old 06-12-2011, 01:25 PM   #22
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We're open to both, seeds and plants. The plant choices (vegis) are limited, but with seeds you have a much greater selection. There are some varieties that you can only get as seeds. I have never seen certain chilis or hierloom tomatoes available as plants locally.

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Old 06-12-2011, 02:11 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
If you replanted it outside in the garden, would it be considered a kidney transplant?
I've been known to try these thing too.
Good one, Bliss!
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Old 06-12-2011, 07:18 PM   #24
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Most of what I tried to grow from seed did nothing for me - except for beans! I'm growing two kinds of bush beans. If the bugs will stop devouring them, they should produce a good crop! About 50% of the corn I grew from seed germinated. Radishes and beets did nothing. Lettuce did not do well for me either.

I had a smattering of other items that germinated, which was fine for me, because I wanted a few plants of several things. Since this is my first year of ever attempting gardening, I am using the square garden method and spent a good part of winter trying to figure out which plants would grow well with what.

By keeping a garden journal, I will decide what I will try again next year, and what is just not worth the space. Also, I will see what I will try to grow from seed again, and what I really need to buy plants to grow. I was very disappointed that NONE of my San Marzano tomatoes germinated. I ended up buying Roma plants for 49 cents a piece for sauce tomatoes. I saw a few plants very early in the season, but could not find them by the time I realized my seeds were just decomposing in the soil.

I never would have tried anything if it were not for this forum though. I felt that if I got in trouble, someone would help!
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Old 06-12-2011, 07:25 PM   #25
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Kathleen, sorry to hear about your san marzano seeds. If you want me to keep some for you for next spring, I can do that. I had pretty good germination on the plants from last year and the seeds germinated again this year.

I've done a germination test, by taking 20 seeds, on a wet paper towel, in a zip lock bag and let it sit over a heating vent, then count the germinated seeds/20. I've taken a tweezers at that point and planted them in flats, and it worked out fine.

Does anyone have advice on corn? I have three rows growing. I know NOTHING of detassling, or why it is done in the farmer's fields. Is it something I need to do in my corn patch? Advice?
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Old 06-12-2011, 07:33 PM   #26
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Kathleen, sorry to hear about your san marzano seeds. If you want me to keep some for you for next spring, I can do that. I had pretty good germination on the plants from last year and the seeds germinated again this year.

I've done a germination test, by taking 20 seeds, on a wet paper towel, in a zip lock bag and let it sit over a heating vent, then count the germinated seeds/20. I've taken a tweezers at that point and planted them in flats, and it worked out fine.

Does anyone have advice on corn? I have three rows growing. I know NOTHING of detassling, or why it is done in the farmer's fields. Is it something I need to do in my corn patch? Advice?

That is a terrific idea, Bliss! I'll try it next year.

You do not need to detassle corn if you are growing it to eat. Detassling is important if you are creating seed corn where you wish to determine the genetics of the seeds. I once de-tassled corn as a summer job. We would detassle three or four rows...then the next four rows were a different variety that they needed to pollinate the first four, and on it would go.

On that same note, if your corn is a hybrid, you do not wish to save seed for the following year. If it is not a hybrid, you can save seed.

Hope that helps.

~Kathleen
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Old 06-12-2011, 07:56 PM   #27
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Kathleen, your post was more Mary Ann than Ginger :) (Science!)

I appreciate the advice on the corn, I knew about not saving hybrid type seeds but had no idea on what detasseling was about, thank you! I'm growing the corn for eating this year, there's nothing like fresh sweet corn.

As an experiment this spring, I took some seeds from my dehydrated san marzano's and did the germination test, and planted the results. I still have quite a bit of those--germination was around 40%. The offer is still open if you want some after harvest this fall. :)
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Old 06-12-2011, 08:06 PM   #28
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Kathleen, your post was more Mary Ann than Ginger :) (Science!)

I appreciate the advice on the corn, I knew about not saving hybrid type seeds but had no idea on what detasseling was about, thank you! I'm growing the corn for eating this year, there's nothing like fresh sweet corn.

As an experiment this spring, I took some seeds from my dehydrated san marzano's and did the germination test, and planted the results. I still have quite a bit of those--germination was around 40%. The offer is still open if you want some after harvest this fall. :)
I'd love some seeds! Thank you!!! More Mary Ann, huh? Now I have to balance that out. Perhaps I should send you my scrub recipe that includes corn meal for an exfoliate.
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Old 06-12-2011, 08:14 PM   #29
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I'd love some seeds! Thank you!!! More Mary Ann, huh? Now I have to balance that out. Perhaps I should send you my scrub recipe that includes corn meal for an exfoliate.
That was definately more Ginger than Mary Ann!
Just PM me your address when you want, and I'll make a note to send the seeds.
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Old 06-12-2011, 10:52 PM   #30
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Don't worry a bit about squeezing the bottom of the pot to get those seedlings out--but DON'T grab the stem or leaves, or pull from the top. One method is to turn the pot upside down, with the stem of the plant between your fingers, and smack the bottom of the pot with your other hand. Or, if you are using those flimsy 6 pack pots, just push the bottom of the pot.
This year I used that self-watering one with 70 spots in it, so there was NO way I could tip it upside down to get each one out because it takes 2 hands just to pick the thing up, and it's flimsy, you're actually not supposed to pick it up. In the directions it just said carefully transplant them into the ground when they're big enough, well, it didn't say HOW to do it because each compartment is made of plastic and since the whole thing is 2 feet long, there is no way to get them out without destroying the plant and all the ones around it! I'd say out of the 70, I only managed to get maybe 10 out without killing them, and even those I'm not so sure about since I just did it a week ago and it's too soon to tell if they will survive or not.

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I don't like peat pots, either. If you leave the top of the pot above the soil, it acts like a wick to move the water from the root zone to the surface where it evaporates. If I buy a plant in a peat pot, I pull the pot completely off, and crumble it into the soil.
That's what I did too, last year when I used peat pots, and I didn't like the look of them laying crumbled in there with the dirt. Also, the plants that had more of that in there didn't do as well. I think next year I'll just plant a few seeds in a big pot from the beginning so I don't have to transplant them. I just hope next year I am living someplace where I have a big room to just let them germinate indoors. A friend of mine also told me he plans on doing this next year too, he hasn't had much luck with seeds & transplanting either.

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A packet of bean seeds is a couple dollars, and if you buy a grown plant, you have no idea about what chemicals have been used on them.
That's a big reason why I chose to grow from seeds in the first place (the other factor being cost), I am really big on things being organic and I don't want any chemicals getting into my food!

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Look for a 'country' store--somewhere out of downtown that does not cater to the 'urban homesteader' crowd. Seedlings are kind of expensive, but shouldn't be anywhere near $10 each. The farmers market may be a good place, but I did pay $3.50 each for pepper plants a couple of weeks ago!
Last year I was unable to get to a farmers market because I had a job working in the mornings when they took place. Now this year I had so many leftover seeds from last year I just used them. I still have enough left to plant next year too. But the plants I bought last year that were already grown I bought at Gertens...I'm not sure if you have those where you live but it's the biggest garden store we have around here, the place takes up a good mile of land, it's just gigantic!

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Pole beans need sturdy support--buy 3 eight foot bamboo poles, tie them together at the top (use wire or some kind of string that won't disintegrate in the sun), and make a teepee. Cukes can grow on a trellis, too, saving you some room. Fasten it to a sunny wall.
Ahhh, that's where I made my mistake with my beans...all I had to prop them up was a straw! Yes, a plastic straw from a fast food resteraunt! Yikes! Then my friend gave me a bamboo stick thing but it was very small and didn't work, the wind just blew my beans over and they died.
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