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Old 06-12-2011, 11:19 PM   #31
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I would advise bush, not pole beans, and bush whatever else as opposed to pole whatever. I use long branches from our evergreens to stick in my containers for trellises and supports for tomatoes.
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:36 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I would advise bush, not pole beans, and bush whatever else as opposed to pole whatever. I use long branches from our evergreens to stick in my containers for trellises and supports for tomatoes.
I was unaware there were 2 different kinds of bean plants! Thanks! and that's a good tip too, using branches from trees! I can't believe I haven't thought of that!
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Old 06-13-2011, 08:24 PM   #33
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I know just the kind of flimsy divided pot you are talking about. One way to get the plants out is to cut the pot with scissors into sections, then push the plants out. The other way is to use a popsicle stick or a butter knife, run it down the side of the pot, and scoop the plant out that way.

I don't like those kinds of pots--I like to use about a 3 inch individual pot, start two or three seeds in each one, and after they are up and have some real leaves on them, I use nail scissors (or my thumbnail) to pinch off all except the biggest plant in the pot. The plants can generally stay in these pots until you are ready to plant--no transplanting needed.

I also like using individual pots because it tends to restrain me from planting 70 tomato plants. :)

I have 44 tomato plants, so it doesn't restrain me enough. In February, when I start my seeds, I am so winter-sick and gardening deprived that I can't help myself. By August, when the humidity and the temp are both hovering close to 100, I tend to lose a little steam.
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Old 06-14-2011, 11:47 AM   #34
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Do yourself a HUGE favor, save a LOT of time & money, & - best of all - have ultimate success & a goodly amount of produce to show for your efforts.

Get thee to a bookstore &/or library & buy or take out some books on vegetable gardening just to get the basics, along with tons of tried & true methods, good vegetable varieties to start with, seeds vs. transplants, etc.
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Old 06-14-2011, 12:37 PM   #35
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We have over 3000 sq. ft. of vegetable gardens. We start a lot of plants from seeds, but we also direct seed. What we start from seeds are peppers (mid-January), eggplant (takes forever--also mid January), celeriac (I killed the seedlings...oops), celery, peppers, tomatoes, leeks, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, herbs. We direct seed beans (we plant 10-12 days apart until late June), radishes, lettuce, kale, swiss chard, spinach, peas, cucumbers, zucchini, squash, kolhrabi, cantalope, watermelon, okra, bok choy, beets, carrots, corn. We plant onion sets and seed potatoes. We plant around May 21st. The only plants I buy are the herbs that didn't germinate or unusual varieties of tomatoes (so we can save the seeds) and aspargus roots (this year). We seem to do okay with growing from seed.
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Old 06-14-2011, 03:09 PM   #36
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I realize that gardening is an art, and you can't just buy a bunch of seeds and stick them all in pots at the same time and expect them all to grow perfectly. I guess it's just overwhelming and confusing to learn how to grow each thing, there is so much out there and everything has it's own requirements. I have read books on it and read websites and watched things on tv, but unless you have been doing it for years or study it every day like you're in school, it's hard to remember everything. I guess I'm a naturally lazy person and just do the bare minimum and expect things to work out (that's how I am with all parts of my life, actually ) Maybe I'll never become a great gardener
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Old 06-14-2011, 03:54 PM   #37
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nope.

here's the voice of decades experience: you're over-thinking the issues (g)

no question as one peers into vegetable x, y, or z you'll find (entirely...) real "expertise" saying 'it grows best at pH 6.3 to 6.5.' - okay. that doesn't mean it won't grow at pH 6.2

it is not overwhelming - with very few exceptions, just start a garden, take care of it, and it will grow. yes, there are some really picky crops... we can talk about that - they are in the extreme minority.

buying good quality "starts" eliminates about 90% of your concerns - those dealing with germinating and seedling TLC.

unless you're blessed with "perfect" soil, work organic matter into the soil every year - spring & fall.
mulch the garden to keep down the weeds and help with an even moisture level.

water as needed. heh, I use a sprinkler - that's pretty 'lazy' (g)

you will learn as you go along.

the biggest 'garden enthusiasm' killer on the planet is "weeds" - they can overwhelm - especially in a fresh plot where there's a _lot_ of weed seed that germinate. there's one simple answer: mulch - 3-5 inches deep. doesn't stop every weed, but about 99.625841% of them. not wood chip mulch - I use grass clippings - but the mulch source may vary by local availability.

oh, start composting. like start last year . . . (g)
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Old 06-14-2011, 04:16 PM   #38
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I admit I over-think things (I'm an obsessive thinker, always have been, always will be) and that makes it hard for me to actually take action and do things, and decide what to do and how to do it, because I get caught up in the thinking/analyzing/planning part of it!

I don't have to worry too much about weeds though because I grow in pots, last year I lived in an apartment so I had to have my pots on the balcony, and this year I am temporarily living at my moms house so my pots are now on her deck and I can take them with me when I move again. I also like that I don't have to worry about animals or weeds. I think I will always stick to doing it this way, now that I have the pots, I don't have to ever buy new ones, or new dirt (although I did have some Miracle Gro dirt leftover that I sprinked on over the old dirt).

Since I am so lazy, I find it hard to calculate the exact time and manner everything should be planted, I just do it all at once whenever I work up the energy (I've also been seriously depressed over the last year so that sucks up my energy too, so i'm extra lazy now!).
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Old 06-14-2011, 06:59 PM   #39
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Repeated successive planting of tomatoes in the same soil and pot can increase likelihood of tomato plants becoming diseased.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:10 PM   #40
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I grew up in northern MN. The pole beans mature closer to the end of August, so you can keep harvesting beans until the first frost (around the 21st of September).

And, since we have 300+ tomato plants, we couldn't afford to buy started plants!
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