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Old 04-07-2012, 07:35 PM   #1
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ISO help/tips making compost

Help! Guidelines, tips, etc. What to add, what not to, store or keep in plastic or metal drum. I don't know where to start.

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Old 04-07-2012, 07:41 PM   #2
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Quote:
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Help! Guidelines, tips, etc. What to add, what not to, store or keep in plastic or metal drum. I don't know where to start.
???

It would help if we knew more about where you live. Is it rural? Is it suburban? Urban? How big is your yard/balcony? What's the wildlife like where you live? Do you get raccoons? Skunks? Bears?

What will you use the compost for? Growing food or just for decorative plants?
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Old 04-07-2012, 08:17 PM   #3
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Here's what we do.

I keep a large copper bucket with a tight fitting lid on the counter. In it goes all the veg scraps, crunched egg shells, coffee grounds and filters, tea bags without the labels, onion peels, etc. No meat at all. When the bucket gets full, we take it to a space which we have walled off with railroad ties, probably 4x4x2. Dimensions don't matter. We dump the bucket of veg matter, stir with a pitchfork occasionally, and dump some more when the bucket fills up again. It's open air, and since no meat products are included, no animals bother it. It HUGELY reduces our garbage (we put out less than half a bin weekly) and makes a nice soil enrichment. If you have room, make 2 bins, one for new stuff, the other for finished compost.
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Old 04-07-2012, 08:29 PM   #4
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Dawgluver, I bet there are lots of bugs and maybe some worms.
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Old 04-07-2012, 09:02 PM   #5
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You are correct, TL, there are a lot of worms!

I do love worms. Makes for really good compost!

Some folks actually have a bucket under the sink and practice worm composting. We haven't quite gotten to that.
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Old 04-07-2012, 09:26 PM   #6
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You are correct, TL, there are a lot of worms!

I do love worms. Makes for really good compost!

Some folks actually have a bucket under the sink and practice worm composting. We haven't quite gotten to that.
I've been thinking about worm composting myself, for winter.

Mine has more sow bugs and other bugs than worms.

My composter was from the city. There is a minimal charge. They subsidize composting because it saves on garbage collection. It looks like a headless Dalek
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Old 04-07-2012, 09:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady

I've been thinking about worm composting myself, for winter.

Mine has more sow bugs and other bugs than worms.

My composter was from the city. There is a minimal charge. They subsidize composting because it saves on garbage collection. It looks like a headless Dalek
I think it's cute!

Ours is just a little RR tie bump-out by the apple tree.
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Old 04-07-2012, 09:37 PM   #8
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Add grass clipping but not leaves or chipped wood and no hay. May tend to attract and breed fruit flies, so locate away from the house if that's a problem. If you decide to compost all the vegetable waste from the kitchen, go with the pile as described, or prepare two bins. I made mine from the common blue plastic 55 gallon drum. Drilled holes all over. Cut and hinged a door in the side. You can roll it back and forth or mount on a cradle made of old casters on treated wood. It sits out by the chicken house. They keep after the flies, and some things get diced up for chicken treats, beef and lamb trimmings and egg shells, making it one trip to dump the scraps.
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Old 04-07-2012, 10:09 PM   #9
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Add grass clipping but not leaves or chipped wood and no hay. May tend to attract and breed fruit flies, so locate away from the house if that's a problem. If you decide to compost all the vegetable waste from the kitchen, go with the pile as described, or prepare two bins. I made mine from the common blue plastic 55 gallon drum. Drilled holes all over. Cut and hinged a door in the side. You can roll it back and forth or mount on a cradle made of old casters on treated wood. It sits out by the chicken house. They keep after the flies, and some things get diced up for chicken treats, beef and lamb trimmings and egg shells, making it one trip to dump the scraps.
Why no leaves or hay?
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Old 04-08-2012, 01:34 PM   #10
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I have the same bin as Taxlady.. it works well, the top keeps the critters out, though we have a large Possum around here has figured out how to open it up..

I save all the veg parts that I used to put down the disposall.. and take them out most every night.. I really cuts down on the waste that normally goes out..

then I bought a Compost Turner tool that looks like stick with side blades.. this really help keep down the fruit flies..

I never use the side door.. I just wait 6 months till it's done, then lift the whole bucket thing, and turn it into my garden.. works very well!

I mainly use leaves from my yard..

Eric, Austin Tx.
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