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Old 11-05-2007, 05:56 AM   #21
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I have tried moving the basil inside to a warmer place but still it's dying. The leaves are going yellow. I've tried to preserve as much of the leaves using salt but I guess I will try to plant a new one next spring. I don't know which variety of basil I have however.
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Old 11-05-2007, 06:14 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i would like to taste perennial basil, to see if any of this matters.
LOL guess it didn't to Timmy!!
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Old 01-05-2008, 11:02 PM   #23
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This will likely be one of those questions you'll laugh with your family over but I'm going to ask it anyway (remember, I'm from sunny California).

How do plants know? I mean, you call a plant an annual or perennial but if you are growing it inside and you give it light and warmth and water, how does it know it's not supposed to grow because it's the wrong time of year? I get the whole photosynthesis thing with outdoor trees dropping their leaves, but I don't get how an indoor plant knows it's not supposed to be growing.
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Old 01-05-2008, 11:49 PM   #24
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Plants have "life" cycles. Regardless of where they are living. Once they
go to seed, their purpose is done and they can die, or go dormant, depending
on what type they are.

If you start seeds indoors, as long as you care for them properly, they will
grow regardless of the season.

My Phd seeking genetic botanist of a wife could tell you precisely why, but it
would be rather in depth, with many multi-syllabic words and confusing phrases
LOLOLOL!

I got a couple of Chia herb garden sets for Christmas, and as soon as I figure out
how to cat proof the window box, they will be planted and should do just fine.
I hope. Need basil, cilantro, mint and some other goodies! :)
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Old 01-06-2008, 08:53 AM   #25
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Exactly - & not a dumb question at all.

"Annuals" are plants that are programmed to go thru just one life cycle. Once they've reproduced - i.e. set seed - that's it for them, regardless of whether you grow them outdoors or inside. Sometimes you can increase their lifespan by removing all blooms &/or seed pods/capsules to prevent them from completing the cycle, but eventually they'll begin losing vigor.

"Perennials" are programmed for pretty much a continuous cycle, although some just naturally have shorter lifespans than others - i.e. when a book or catalog reads "short-lived" or "long-lived" perennial. It's sort of like the natural lifespans different animals have.

Now "tender perennials" are the ones that, although grown as annuals in cold climates, can be kept going virtually forever if their conditions can be met indoors. For instance, I've known folks who've grown pepper plants indoors until they've resembled small trees. I've done the same thing with Coleus plants. And Impatiens are supposed to make lovely little houseplants for a sunny windowsill - just like African Violets.
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Old 01-13-2008, 01:35 AM   #26
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so... i got one of the basil potted plants from a supermarket. I have a grow light because our apartment doesn't get very much light. I have been growing thyme, sage and oregano under it along with a few potted flowers. I had the other herbs about a month before the basil. I got the basil and have been giving it about 6 hours of grow light and it seems to be wasting away. It isn't completely dead..but it probably will be in a few days at this rate. The soil is damp, the roots are getting water.. there is some plant food in the soil, but that came from the supermarket.
Any ideas? Is it better to start out with seeds? Thanks
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Old 02-13-2008, 03:24 PM   #27
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basil

I found a way to have fresh basil during the winter months.

Use snack size plastic bags, put basil leaves in and fill with water, freeze. When ready to use, toss the frozen basil into the food or thaw and use as much as needed.

Basil tastes just like fresh when frozen in water.

Misty800
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Old 02-13-2008, 04:21 PM   #28
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First off, I'd definitely try again with seeds Tdiprincess. Cheaper, plus supermarket plants go thru a lot stress between being shipped from the distributor to the store & then being kept in less than optimum conditions before a sale.

Also give your plants more light. Six hours of artificial light isn't nearly enough. They need about twice that.
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Old 02-13-2008, 04:23 PM   #29
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Thanks for the tip, Misty, I'll give it a whirl---I'm always throwing out rotting basil because I haven't used it all and anything with plant cells costs a fortune here----when I go produce shopping here I try and not pass out.
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Old 02-13-2008, 04:25 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by expatgirl View Post
Thanks for the tip, Misty, I'll give it a whirl---I'm always throwing out rotting basil because I haven't used it all and anything with plant cells costs a fortune here----when I go produce shopping here I try and not pass out.
Here's another similar method: ISO Info Growing Basil
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