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Old 11-07-2013, 10:49 AM   #11
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Thanks GG, but they really don't look like the old field apples we used to have around here. They resemble Roxbury Russet apples but the pictures of that variety that I have seen are just too uniform and don't have the speckling that I remember.
The field apples I recall were various sizes, knobbly, kinda ugly apples. Likely derived from Roxbury Russet, but then maybe my memories of those apples has been clouded by time.
sounds like egremont russet to me ol' hoss.they have the speckling/spots that can merge into patches,reddish flush when ripe.the ones in the pic are pretty uniform(of course!),but egremont can be a bit mishapen.eaten straight off the tree they have that sweet/sharp tang that you describe.goes well with wild turkey,or so i'm told i'm told mate!!
Egremont Russet & Jonagold Blackmoor Nurseries
you can see the mottling etc more clearly if you click to enlarge the image.
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:23 PM   #12
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Lol, I use a GPS to "mark" the exact LOCATION of the trees I want to graft. I will try to be more clear in the future.

Hoot, that tree may have been a cultivar unique to your area. A lot of these trees are not "wild" but cultivated trees. Selected by local farmers for specific reason and purpose. By the turn of the century, {the one before this past one,} there were an estimated 4,000 types of apple trees. Unfortunately rural history is not written down. It is passed down orally.

I went to a seminar and the "orange pippin" was mentioned. There is a guy who is growing "heirloom" apples in Upstate New York. He wants to make "hard cider" as unique as wines from France.
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:13 AM   #13
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Lol, I use a GPS to "mark" the exact LOCATION of the trees I want to graft. I will try to be more clear in the future.

Hoot, that tree may have been a cultivar unique to your area. A lot of these trees are not "wild" but cultivated trees. Selected by local farmers for specific reason and purpose. By the turn of the century, {the one before this past one,} there were an estimated 4,000 types of apple trees. Unfortunately rural history is not written down. It is passed down orally.

I went to a seminar and the "orange pippin" was mentioned. There is a guy who is growing "heirloom" apples in Upstate New York. He wants to make "hard cider" as unique as wines from France.
well trish,he'll have a ready made export market to the uk.heard on the bbc news the other day that we drink more cider than any other country(could have been per capita),infact cider sales exceed those of lager.i'll drink to that!!
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Old 01-29-2014, 12:11 PM   #14
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Hubby and I have "marked" 3 trees for grafting. We scout the hill sides for "indigenous" fruit trees. Mostly old apple/pear/plum trees that were on old farmsteads. They have been bought out by the forestry service. These old trees produce some amazing fruits! We plan on taking "graftings" from these trees, and graft them onto viable root stock plants. I am so excited about this! Any one else grow "old" varieties?
Be careful. If its federal land or designated as park land, you could be breaking the law.
While I am one to not care what you do, they might.
I know here in the national forest, you cannot remove anything. The only thing you are allowed to take home is a picture.

Fines can be very steep.
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Old 01-29-2014, 12:31 PM   #15
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Be careful. If its federal land or designated as park land, you could be breaking the law.
While I am one to not care what you do, they might.
I know here in the national forest, you cannot remove anything. The only thing you are allowed to take home is a picture.

Fines can be very steep.
I agree with that.
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Old 01-29-2014, 01:00 PM   #16
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I just realized that the title was a bit ambiguous, and I cracked myself up. I don't urinate on trees, lol. Sorry about that. Chief, if it's a mature tree with large limbs, you're out of luck. The general rule of thumb is grafting a branch about the size of your thumb. They do sell grafted trees with several varieties on one tree. I've heard of "orange pippin"! Maybe it was from the documentary Botany of Desire.
I was going to say I know a neighbor's dog who marks trees and it isn't quite that complicated.

Sorry! I miss my Mamma and I'm trying to cheer myself up and get over it.

With love,
~Cat
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Old 01-29-2014, 05:42 PM   #17
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I think that's how we ended up with our Kieffer Pear. It was the stock that the "other pear (ornamental)" was grafted to but somehow the base stock took over and we ended up with a fruit producing pear tree.
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:33 PM   #18
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Haven't seen trish for quite some time, but she and her husband are long-time farmers with quite a bit of land.
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