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Old 11-04-2013, 11:52 PM   #1
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Marking trees

Hubby and I have "marked" 3 trees for grafting. We scout the hill sides for "indigenous" fruit trees. Mostly old apple/pear/plum trees that were on old farmsteads. They have been bought out by the forestry service. These old trees produce some amazing fruits! We plan on taking "graftings" from these trees, and graft them onto viable root stock plants. I am so excited about this! Any one else grow "old" varieties?

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Old 11-05-2013, 01:45 AM   #2
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No, but it sounds like a great idea.
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Old 11-05-2013, 07:59 AM   #3
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This sounds like a great idea. Can you top an apple tree that produces small, soft apples, then graft in branches from a good apple tree, and if so, can the grafts be made lower on the trunk?

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Old 11-05-2013, 11:47 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
This sounds like a great idea. Can you top an apple tree that produces small, soft apples, then graft in branches from a good apple tree, and if so, can the grafts be made lower on the trunk?

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
this chap has grafted 250 different varieties onto one rootstock chief!!.the norm is two or three different varieties or,as trish proposes(i think),just one variety onto a sturdy/viable rootstock.can be done with pears,plums,peaches & nectarines too.not all on the same rootstock tho'!!
250 varieties of apple on one tree... thanks to a bit of hard grafting over the years | Mail Online
when bolas & i were growing up in north wales we were lucky enough to have an orchard as part of the garden.i remember some of the varieties included lord lambourne,egremont russet,cox's orange pippin,bramley & worcester permain.
happy day's chief!!
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Old 11-05-2013, 09:57 PM   #5
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I just realized that the title was a bit ambiguous, and I cracked myself up. I don't urinate on trees, lol. Sorry about that. Chief, if it's a mature tree with large limbs, you're out of luck. The general rule of thumb is grafting a branch about the size of your thumb. They do sell grafted trees with several varieties on one tree. I've heard of "orange pippin"! Maybe it was from the documentary Botany of Desire.
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Old 11-06-2013, 02:00 AM   #6
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I just realized that the title was a bit ambiguous, and I cracked myself up. I don't urinate on trees, lol. Sorry about that. Chief, if it's a mature tree with large limbs, you're out of luck. The general rule of thumb is grafting a branch about the size of your thumb. They do sell grafted trees with several varieties on one tree. I've heard of "orange pippin"! Maybe it was from the documentary Botany of Desire.
shame that trish,had visions of you on tippy toe,back to your unfortunate victim with your bum in the air spraying your chosen tree.guess it would stop someone else from "nicking" your idea,that's for sure!!
cox's orange pippin is a very old english apple variety & a classic too.you almost get two apples in one.picked straight from the tree it is crisp,sweet & slightly "tart" or sharp at the same time.with storage the flesh softens slightly & the taste mellows to a very deep flavour.keeps fairly well,but not as long as some varieties.good cooker where a soft or collapsed texture is needed.pretty disease resistant too.the trees in our orchard were felled about three years ago.the cox's had stopped producing through age(50-60 years old at felling)but were still healthy.
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Old 11-07-2013, 06:50 AM   #7
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There used to be literally hundreds of apple trees in the fields all around here. The apples were tart and sweet at the same time. They were great for freezing, drying, canning, applesauce, and plain ol' eating. The peel was mostly green with a blush of red at peak ripeness. The peel also had faint grayish mottling or what we called spots. Alas, most, if not all of the trees have been taken down for the convenience of planting and harvesting, as well as increasing the amount of productive area in the fields. I sure would like to know what variety these apples are. I always keep an eye peeled for these trees but they are scarce as hen's teeth in these parts.
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:16 AM   #8
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Hoot, I have The Apple Lover's Cookbook which includes a guide to apple varieties with pictures and descriptions. It sounds like it might be a Black Twig: http://www.treesofantiquity.com/inde...products_id=27
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:33 AM   #9
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Thanks GG, but they really don't look like the old field apples we used to have around here. They resemble Roxbury Russet apples but the pictures of that variety that I have seen are just too uniform and don't have the speckling that I remember.
The field apples I recall were various sizes, knobbly, kinda ugly apples. Likely derived from Roxbury Russet, but then maybe my memories of those apples has been clouded by time.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:47 AM   #10
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Thanks GG, but they really don't look like the old field apples we used to have around here. They resemble Roxbury Russet apples but the pictures of that variety that I have seen are just too uniform and don't have the speckling that I remember.
The field apples I recall were various sizes, knobbly, kinda ugly apples. Likely derived from Roxbury Russet, but then maybe my memories of those apples has been clouded by time.
I didn't think that picture looked like your what you said, either, but the description did. If you do a Google Images search, there are other pix that look more like it.
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