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Old 05-07-2014, 06:16 PM   #11
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I would go with one plant each of parsley, oregano, chives, basil ( broad leaf)and thyme. Also, a nasturtium is a great idea for colour and just because it looks so pretty and tastes good in salads. This way you can enjoy the summer pickings, harvest what's left in Autumn and replenish the soil over winter. Shrubs such as rosemary or sage are long term big plants that do better in open soil and on NO account plant mint. It will invade everything else so plant that separately, it;s worth doing it as it is invaluable during summer. Think of all those cocktails................................Ermm, nice!!
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:09 PM   #12
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One summer my sister and I went up to the North Shore for an outdoor concert. It was at the Oldest Ironworks in the country. It was one of the first businesses that was built by the Pilgrims. There was a cottage there that was part of the site. At the kitchen back door was a garden. It was all the herbs that the wife would use in her cooking. They were all labeled. They were the weeds that today we would be pulling up and tossing. Golden Rod was thriving and looked real pretty. There were some wild onions also.

I told my sister, who was planning on planting a herb garden, to just let the weeds grow, put labels on them and no one would know the difference. Everyone would think she had a great green thumb. Another one of my suggestions turned down. I don't understand why.
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Old 05-09-2014, 06:27 PM   #13
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I recently built my wife a long, narrow wooden planter, about 24" high, 8" wide, and 6 feet long. She planted about 6 different herbs in it, spaced evenly, and they're seem to be doing fine.
Just make sure you don't group together herbs with drastically different sun light requirements.
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Old 05-09-2014, 07:24 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
You can grow herbs successfully in pots, although you will need to clip them regularly; rosemary, in particular, is naturally a small shrub, so it's hard to have it do well in a container. If a 24-inch pot is all you have room for, you can give it a try, but the larger, the better.

I would suggest chives in the center and prostrate forms of thyme, oregano and sage around the sides. Herbs thrive on neglect, so don't fertilize much, if at all, and be careful not to over-water them. Most herbs need full sun, too.

Basil needs more water than other herbs, so I would put that in a separate container. In my garden, I plant it with the tomatoes and peppers.

Here's some more information on specific herbs and container planting: Best Herbs for Container Gardens

Hope this helps.
There is a school of thought (which a keen gardening friend of mine adheres to) that basil planted amongst tomato plants improved the tomatoes' flavour.
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Old 05-09-2014, 07:38 PM   #15
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There is a school of thought (which a keen gardening friend of mine adheres to) that basil planted amongst tomato plants improved the tomatoes' flavour.
I haven't heard that before, but I wouldn't be surprised. I've always planted them together, so I don't have a basis for comparison.
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Old 05-09-2014, 07:42 PM   #16
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I would go with one plant each of parsley, oregano, chives, basil ( broad leaf)and thyme. Also, a nasturtium is a great idea for colour and just because it looks so pretty and tastes good in salads. This way you can enjoy the summer pickings, harvest what's left in Autumn and replenish the soil over winter. Shrubs such as rosemary or sage are long term big plants that do better in open soil and on NO account plant mint. It will invade everything else so plant that separately, it;s worth doing it as it is invaluable during summer. Think of all those cocktails................................Ermm, nice!!
My mother grew mint in a bucket sunk into the ground in the veg patch. It still escaped. When the new kitchen extension was built on top of what had been the veg patch the mint managed to poke through between the new wall and the concrete path outside, despite the veg patch being totally destroyed by the excavations for the foundation of the extension!

Don't let it put you off. Mint is lovely and there are lots of different varieties - spearmint, apple mint, pineapple mint, orange, chocolate and ginger mints to name but a few. Mint goes with lamb, salads, middle eastern food and a sprig in the water for boiling new potatoes or garden peas is good. It also makes a soothing tea when you've eaten too much or when you are hot and exhausted. It also repels flies, fleas, mice, rats and ants.
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Old 05-09-2014, 07:55 PM   #17
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My mother grew mint in a bucket sunk into the ground in the veg patch. It still escaped. When the new kitchen extension was built on top of what had been the veg patch the mint managed to poke through between the new wall and the concrete path outside, despite the veg patch being totally destroyed by the excavations for the foundation of the extension!

Don't let it put you off. Mint is lovely and there are lots of different varieties - spearmint, apple mint, pineapple mint, orange, chocolate and ginger mints to name but a few. Mint goes with lamb, salads, middle eastern food and a sprig in the water for boiling new potatoes or garden peas is good. It also makes a soothing tea when you've eaten too much or when you are hot and exhausted. It also repels flies, fleas, mice, rats and ants.
Good advice. I have two types of mint in different containers in my yard: in a strawberry jar and another pot. They do great here.
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Old 05-09-2014, 08:02 PM   #18
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My mints are all sunk in pots in my shade garden. And I still get escapees.

Oregano is another one that goes crazy. It pretty much obliterated my thyme.
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