"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Culinary Gardener
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-11-2008, 07:25 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
I am gonna need to start writing this stuff down if I am going to start em up in the next month or so! I love all the different kinds of pepper, and want to get into some Central American, Asian, and Southeast Asian pepper varieties. And anything else that sounds cool while I am at it ;) I think my biggest problem now is going to be having enough space for them all!
The 'zone thing', LOL, is just a guide line. My wife is more of a purist, due in most part to her belonging to a native and organic initiative. She prefers not to 'push' it by bringing in plants that wouldn't naturally grow here without help. IE any plant that is going to need extra watering or chemical help to get by here is a big no-no in her book.
I, on the other hand, consider anything that grows and I would consume as 'natural' to grow here, LOL. If I had my way I would be back on an acreage or two with at least half it being food gardens! I also miss our apple orchard.
But as far as flower gardens go, I do prefer the native prairie garden. In drought conditions my garden does just fine without watering while the neighbors are constantly watering their lawns and gardens vainly attempting to keep them alive. During a wet year I have to do a lot of pruning back, otherwise I end up with 6' tall plants!
__________________

__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 07:44 AM   #12
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
No worries! I've been growing everything & anything for many many years now in a totally organic fashion. No chemical pesticides or fertilizers used here & everything grows like a weed (including the weeds - lol!!). I just utilize lots & lots of homemade compost, mulch, & natural pest controls. It can definitely be done, no matter where you live.
__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 09:59 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Don't you just hate it when weeds grow like weeds and the plants just don't?? LOL. We have a mulch pile and compost as well. We recycle as much organic stuff as we can to put in the garden.
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 10:32 AM   #14
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
The 'zone thing', LOL, is just a guide line. My wife is more of a purist, due in most part to her belonging to a native and organic initiative. She prefers not to 'push' it by bringing in plants that wouldn't naturally grow here without help. IE any plant that is going to need extra watering or chemical help to get by here is a big no-no in her book.
I live north of you. Not sure what Zone I am in. My peppers get planted, watered, and occasionally Miracle Growed.

No extra help whatsoever. They are basically ignored all summer.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 02:25 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Isn't Miracle Grow extra help?
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 05:52 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
Isn't Miracle Grow extra help?

Yeah, it is. But if I weren't so lazy, I'd be a composter. All gardens need some sort of fertilizer.

My point is that my hot peppers grow like crazy with very little adult supervision. As opposed to my zucchini and yellow squash which I had to assist in the pollination of with q-tips. Sheesh.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 10:37 AM   #17
Sous Chef
 
JGDean's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Northwest Florida
Posts: 540
I lived in Champaign, IL for a couple of years. Everything grew well there. I had a cherry tomato plant that came back in Spring on it's own and grew to over 5 feet tall the second year!
__________________
JGDean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 02:33 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Yeah, it is. But if I weren't so lazy, I'd be a composter. All gardens need some sort of fertilizer.

My point is that my hot peppers grow like crazy with very little adult supervision. As opposed to my zucchini and yellow squash which I had to assist in the pollination of with q-tips. Sheesh.
That is more of what I am looking for. Once we get into our busy season, we just don't have any time to tend anything. About the only thing we put into our gardens are coffee grounds. We also rake the leaves from the neighbors tree into the beds, then dig it all in the next spring. Never had to add anything else to it. A friend did give us a composter, but it is sitting in the back of the yard unused so far. DW says she is planning on finding it a home in the yard somewhere this year and using it.
I don't mind as long as it doesn't take a lot of maintenance.

Did you try making the squash and zucchini watch a film on the birds and the bees??
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 03:09 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Unfortunately Maverick, since vegetables have a high water content, you will have to be consistent with watering them if you plan to have any sort of decent yield. Plus, keeping moisture levels consistent keeps the plants healthier in the long run. Reaching a wilt point before getting a drink creates way too much stress for them.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 03:33 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Well, the way things are now my entire front and back yard are nothing but prairie gardens with flagstone paths running thru them (I posted pics of the front garden on here).
The last couple of years I have slowly begun influencing her and changing the structure of the gardens. Most of her larger plants and what I call 'flop over' plants have been removed from the front garden and replaced with shorter bushier flowery plants along with a couple of knock out roses.
I still have a couple of flagstone walls to finish up, as well as the lighting, a light post, and re-doing my 'special' side garden that is all mine.
Then, I am moving to the back yard. The patio is getting extended, the sidewalk moved, a fountain put in, and the paths re-done. Once the hardscaping is done, we are going to sit down and re-deign the back yard garden. Part of that includes finding a home for her composter so it is easy to get at but doesn't stick out like a sore thumb. Another part is introducing a water barrel we got in a trade for services.
It was my plan to find a specific section near the patio that would be the veggie garden and put the rain barrel there, for easy watering. The wife already has an elderberry bush there and a wild currant bush there as well so I was going to put the veggies around them.
You are quite right they have to be watered regularly, and if I don't find any easy way to ensure they are watered regularly, we will end up not having the time and they will suffer for it I am sure.
That is the whole point of her prairie garden, it never needs watering or fertilizing with outside sources. Rain is sufficient to sustain it, and coffee grinds, egg shells, and leaves are enough to keep it rich and healthy.
__________________

__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.