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Old 07-13-2014, 02:09 PM   #1
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Planting Garlic from Sprouted Cloves

We just got back from our beach vacation yesterday and one head of garlic plus a clove are sprouting, so I'm going to plant them in the garden. Here in Zone 7, we can plant garlic and onions any time the ground can be worked and they will be ready about eight months later; you can tell when they're ready when the leaves wilt and turn brown - see photo 2 below. Plant them about four inches deep with the sprout facing up, about eight inches apart.

If you live further north in a cooler climate, check with your local extension office to find out when is the best time to plant them outside. If they sprout during the winter, I see no reason why you couldn't put them in a pot and then plant them outside in the spring.

I use garlic from the grocery store that has sprouted in the kitchen. I've heard that garlic and other root veggies are treated with something to prevent sprouting, but my experience is that grocery-store garlic does sprout, so into the garden they go!

To harvest, just pull them out of the ground. Brush off the dirt, but do not clean with water or cut off the leaves. After harvesting, put them in a box or other dry location (I put them on wire racks in the sunroom) to cure for two weeks. Then, you can braid the leaves together and hang the bunch in the kitchen, pantry, or other place you have for storing onions and potatoes - but not in the fridge!

Pix:
1) Sprouting garlic.
2) Garlic in the ground, ready to be harvested.
3) Freshly harvested garlic.
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:18 PM   #2
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Thanks, GG, I'd been meaning to ask you about this. I planted some sprouted cloves from the Asian market a few weeks ago. They all have healthy green shoots. We're zone 5 here, so I'll probably leave them in over winter and see what I get next spring.
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:45 PM   #3
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Thank you, GG. I'll have to try that next time I see that my garlic has grown shoots.
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Old 07-13-2014, 03:01 PM   #4
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You're welcome, Dawg and Cheryl I hope yours are as successful as mine have been.
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Old 07-13-2014, 08:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Here in Zone 7, we can plant garlic and onions any time the ground can be worked and they will be ready about eight months later; .

I use garlic from the grocery store that has sprouted in the kitchen.
.
OK, I am jut a little jealous of the fact you can plant any time you want. AND that you can grow grocery store garlic. My Zone 5 (I say it's Z4 most years) doesn't like softneck garlic, although I have been working on one strain. I want to braid...hardnecks won't cooperate.

I plant a lot, with the goal of finding garlic with huge cloves (not elephant garlic) that stores until May and peels itself. Having some success with eastern European types. I'm down to 20 or so kinds...with 39 the all-time high, lol. We have gorging ourselves on scapes the last couple of weeks...one benefit of growing hardnecks.


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Old 07-13-2014, 09:07 PM   #6
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Wow, looks great, Bookbrat! We don't have nearly enough space for that much garlic.
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Old 07-13-2014, 09:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
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OK, I am jut a little jealous of the fact you can plant any time you want. AND that you can grow grocery store garlic. My Zone 5 (I say it's Z4 most years) doesn't like softneck garlic, although I have been working on one strain. I want to braid...hardnecks won't cooperate.
I live in zone 4a, and the one softneck variety that consistently seemed to work well for me was called Polish White. I had to special order it, and always planted in November right before the ground froze - the same time my wife planted her flower bulbs. I could never get the stuff from the grocery store to grow, either. I suspect whatever variety it is was just too tender for my climate.

About 12 years ago, I tilled much of the garden under and planted a small vineyard its place. The vineyard has its own rewards, but I miss growing garlic, and especially miss the scapes.
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Old 07-13-2014, 09:50 PM   #8
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This is from the people at Burpee Seed Company.

How to Grow Garlic Bulbs - Gardening Tips and Advice at Burpee.com

I hope it will give you information you are seeking. I always planted my cloves in the fall and let them winter over.
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:55 AM   #9
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This is from the people at Burpee Seed Company.

How to Grow Garlic Bulbs - Gardening Tips and Advice at Burpee.com

I hope it will give you information you are seeking. I always planted my cloves in the fall and let them winter over.
Who, me? I already know how to grow garlic. That's why I posted this thread
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Old 07-14-2014, 11:29 AM   #10
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When I turned up to the garden this year to do the first tilling and get things ready there were these stalks poking up. Wasn't sure if they were onions, garlic or shallots (we had all three in last year roughly in that area).

Turns out we got garlic. Since they stalks were browning and dying back I pulled them a few days ago and they are curing.
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