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Old 04-23-2008, 11:16 AM   #1
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Settle a gardening "argument"?

Not really an argument.... more of a debate.
DH seems to think I need to till the garden over to "prep" before I can plant in it.
I say it's all dirt, I can just plunk my stuff in.
Any thoughts?

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Old 04-23-2008, 11:25 AM   #2
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I have a black thumb.. but, Paul always makes sure there's fresh dirt on top before he plants and his garden is beautiful.
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:26 AM   #3
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It depends on what you are planting. Seed should have tilled soil to give them space to grow Smaller plants would get a better start in tilled soil. If you are planting mature plants, you could put them straight into a hole.

It also depends on your soil, if it is a light soil, it would need less tilling. A heavy, clay soil would almost certainly need tilling - at least mine does as it goes in to a compact mass.

You may also want to incoporate enriching stuff such as manure that could be done whilst tilling.
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:26 AM   #4
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I agree with DH. Tilling the soil breaks it up and "fluffs" it so the roots have an easier job of growing and spreading out and so water can penetrate to the roots more easily.

If he thinks it needs to be tilled, tell him to do it then sit back and drink my favorite brand of beer.
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:27 AM   #5
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When I moved into this house there was a small garden bed. I did not do a thing to it before I planted my first year other than pick out some of the large rocks and debris. My plants that year grew great.

I do till now though.
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:28 AM   #6
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I don't mind doing the tilling....
That just means I deserve more beers! :)
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:33 AM   #7
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What miniman and Andy said.

I rented a rototiller this year for the garden and then went a bit overboard on the front lawn
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:39 AM   #8
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I think tilling does help soften the ground for the tender roots, but if your ground is pretty soft you might be okay. I live in Utah and so most soil around here is clay. We HAVE to till.

You could always do an experiment: till half your garden and just plant in the other half and see what works better. That way you might be able to avoid some extra work next year.
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:42 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie View Post
Not really an argument.... more of a debate.
DH seems to think I need to till the garden over to "prep" before I can plant in it.
I say it's all dirt, I can just plunk my stuff in.
Any thoughts?
DH always tills and adds manure early in the spring, combined with weeding and cleaning out from last year.

What is your soil like?
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Old 04-23-2008, 11:43 AM   #10
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It's very very fine sandy stuff. We added a pile of black dirt to it last year when we built it, so its a nice consistency now, but it could use another load of compost. I suppose thats better tilled in than just raked over the top?
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