"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Culinary Gardener
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-11-2008, 04:06 PM   #11
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 503
GotGarlic, thank you for searching. I'm familiar with this website. Mr. Burger is an attorney, who has a passion for gardening, mostly flowers.

We are in a tight spot- between frost and heat. If one doesn't kill them, the other will.
Tomatoes with short plant -to -harvest time are recommended.

Temps now are in the 70's, doesn't get much cooler at night - my windows are open. I doubt we'll have another freeze. so I took the chance.

Thank you for the heads-up. If we do, by chance, get a cold spell, I can replant.
__________________

__________________
simplicity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 08:12 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
suziquzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MN
Posts: 11,488
Send a message via AIM to suziquzie
I tried the laying down thing once and broke a few plants. Now I just dig them deeper. I have read that the benefit is a stronger plant, because tomatoes are actually a vining plant, the more they can vine underground, the stronger the plant. Not sure if it's actually because of the deep planting, but I sure do get some TALL plants! A few of last years were as tall as or a little taller than me! (5'6)
Wow I wish I could put mine in the ground March 8th. I have to wait til Mother's Day. You'll have tomatoes by the time mine go in!
__________________

__________________
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
suziquzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 09:02 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Yes, Mother's Day has always been my traditional day to plant out my tomatoes, peppers, & eggplants - both here in VA & also when I lived in NY. Sometimes I put them in a little earlier, but it can be dicey. Last year we were still getting sporadic heavy frosts in late April, & the couple of extra weeks isn't worth it to me having to run out & cover/uncover lots of plants - lol!

The only things that go out earlier are peas, greens, & brassicas.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2008, 09:21 AM   #14
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
I just started my tomato seeds this week, here in Missouri.

Thirteen different heirloom varieties might be a little excessive for a woman who lives alone, but it will be a great summer!!

(I will be selling the extra plants to benefit our spay/neuter program.)
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2008, 07:06 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
suziquzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MN
Posts: 11,488
Send a message via AIM to suziquzie
Sparrowgrass,
have you tried the Black Krim from Burpee? They are just wonderful!
I am trying to cut back on my varieties this year, but that's one I will always do!
__________________
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
suziquzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2008, 07:36 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,603
hey, I'm growing Black Krim this year, for the first time. I vary what year I grow a lot of a certain vegetable to can/freeze, and this year I do not can tomatoes, so I will grow a few heirloom varities to eat fresh and do a little sauce. It is too early for me to start tomato plants here in southern ohio. I bought my Black Krim seeds from Cook's Garden catalog. I'm also planting San Marzano and Caspian Pink
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2008, 12:02 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
I don't think I have any Black Krim--I did get Ananas Noir (black pineapple) and Cherokee Purple.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2008, 12:08 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
oneoffour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Levittown Pa
Posts: 169
Planting deeper is okay as long as you have good drainage. A deep hole in heavy clay soil is a bath tub of moisture to drown the plant. Deep is a relative term as it refers only to the depth of loose soil compared to the depth of surounding denser media. Planting on the side avoids the possible risk of suffocating/ drowning a plant in a bath tub surrounded by denser heavier soil. Naturally a well prepared vegetable garden will have a good balance of sand, silt and clay as the mineral components of the soil. Given good preparation aids overall aeration for the garden then there is little risk of injury planting deeper.

A couple years back the Farmers Almanac was calling for a wetter than usual year. Just for the heck of it I followed and planted the tomatos in berms of soil to help keep them drier. I had a good crop but everyone else had poor ones. The only difference was the berms gave me enough drainage for that wet season. The point being to know your soil, weather, plants and cultural practices. Forgeting one it is hard to compensate with the other steps.
__________________
oneoffour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2008, 04:34 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 470
I have tried planting my tomatoes both ways, and it hasn't made any difference in yield. I am going to our plants from seed this weekend. I have 3 heirlooms that I love. One was my grandmothers and I don't know a name for them, but we have been saving the seed for decades now. Tell me about the black krim? At the farmers market last week, one of the guys said that heirloomtomatoes.com had a wonderful selection of seeds.
__________________
carolelaine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 11:13 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
SpiritWolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Townsville, Australia.
Posts: 151
Send a message via MSN to SpiritWolf Send a message via Yahoo to SpiritWolf
Question Tomatoes

Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
At just 8" tall, your plants will be just fine as is.

Planting tomatoes in a trough on their sides like that is really for plants that are overgrown & spindly. Planting them on their sides with just the tips protruding will give them a much better chance of growing in a more sturdy fashion. And yes, roots will grow out along the buried stem.

While I've never had to do the sideways planting, I normally trim off the lower leaves & bury my tomatoes deeper than they were originally growing in their pots if they're not as thick-stemmed & bushy as I would like, or if I've been lazy & haven't repotted them as often as I should have.

But your guys should be just fine. :)
I might try this way of planting for my seedling tommys, as they are very spindly and leggy, even though they are seedlings and are only a few weeks old. Im not sure why, I dont normally have a problem and I usually have an abundence of tommys. I always start them off in pots,never directly in the ground. Any ideas on why my seedlings may be growing all spindly and leggy, I dont normally fertilize until they are months old.
__________________

__________________
SpiritWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.