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Old 02-07-2008, 10:39 AM   #1
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Tomato Talk

It seems I learn something new every year when it comes to growing veggies, etc. This year will be: more cherry tomato plants, less roma plants, more Jersey tomatoes, more bell peppers, some sort of green bean (I like snacking on those and the cherry tomatoes when I'm working in the yard). I plan on giving lettuce another go, along with squash and zucchini.

Herbs will be the usual: Basil, Parsley, Rosemary, Thyme, Oregano, Chives, Coriander. I still didn't buy a Laurel Bay yet.

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Old 02-07-2008, 03:55 PM   #2
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Jeekinz I got a European Tomato press from Lee Valley Tools (leevalley.com) last year and having used it in 07 I am going with more romas, no beef steak, fewer cherry and changing to Better boys. I tried the supersonics and didn't like the shape or color of the fruit. I see you are in Jersey I'm in Pa just across the river in Bucks county.
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Old 02-07-2008, 04:08 PM   #3
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Jeekinz I got a European Tomato press from Lee Valley Tools (leevalley.com) last year and having used it in 07 I am going with more romas, no beef steak, fewer cherry and changing to Better boys. I tried the supersonics and didn't like the shape or color of the fruit. I see you are in Jersey I'm in Pa just across the river in Bucks county.
For some reason my Romas came out 'mealey'. My cherry tomatoes and Jersey's were excellent. Any idea on the Romas?

I've purchased alot of woodworking tools from Lee Valley. Great quality.
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Old 02-07-2008, 04:11 PM   #4
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Old 02-07-2008, 05:05 PM   #5
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Jeekinz without poking in the dirt and seeing the plants I would guess on two factors that could influnce mealyness. First check your soil pH if that is off the plants fail to pick up the right balance of nutrients to make the cell structure just right. Second factor is moisture fluctuation. The mirco climate around the plants may have been to dry close to time of havest. The plants draw of moiture from the fruit to survive and the texture of the fruit can be mealy as the water is removed. Picture dry or wet spunge cells... There are several varieties of romas I got a different one and had far less blossom end rot!
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Old 02-07-2008, 05:06 PM   #6
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i get the same problem with romas. my cherry tomatoes are great i cant plant enough, i use burpee super sweet 100's. My middle son plants his little chair in the middle of the garden and picks and eats those til they're gone!
I tried one called big mama last year, supposed to be good for sauce, but most had blossom end rot, new garden spot, i'm thinking from what i've read there wasnt enuf calcuim in my dirt ...errrrr... soil.
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Old 02-07-2008, 09:13 PM   #7
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Blossom end rot is calcium related you can add lime to the soil or as I remember you can dust the fruit at pink stage to help. Ideally check your soil pH and lime accordingly now. The fruit dusting may be to little to late. BER happens more when soil is to wet so don't over mulch or over water as fruit reaches harvest stage.
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Old 02-08-2008, 07:16 AM   #8
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Come to think of it that was the other problem, we had a very dry summer, until the 2nd week of August, it rained a ton up until october. Mother Nature ruined my tomatoes!
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Old 02-08-2008, 07:57 AM   #9
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jeekinz, oneoffour is right on!
there's 4 basic variables for every year's tomato crop. the amount of rain, the amount of sun/cloudy days, how hot it gets, and of course, your soil.

these things will affect how juicy or mealy your tomatoes will come out. every year is different.

since you can't change the weather, the only things that you have control of are your soil and watering, the latter still being influenced by the weather. i don't know how many times i've counted on rain and not watered the garden, and then of course it doesn't rain. then i water to make up for it, and the skies open up. the dry spell followed by too much water invariably causes cracking.

btw, oneoffour, we love bucks county. we go to new hope and the surrounding area at least once or twice a year.
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Old 02-08-2008, 08:01 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie
but most had blossom end rot, new garden spot, i'm thinking from what i've read there wasnt enuf calcuim in my dirt ...errrrr... soil.
Maybe, maybe not. Sometimes the plant has a problem utilizing the calcium in the soil, during very wet periods followed by very dry periods or vice-versa. Side dress your plants at first bloom with a small amount of Calcium Nitrate, and every 10 days or so during the growing season. It's not a panacea for blossom end rot, but it really helps.
Sprays are usually not very effective..by the time you see the problem...it's to late.

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