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Old 08-09-2011, 08:58 AM   #61
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his was definitely an eye of the beholder thing. I just thought it looked like someone with a particularly funny nose until someone turned it upside down and really started laughing!

One of my tomato bushes seems to have sprouted some kind of rot. It started after the flood. It is odd that only one bush is affected. I have 3 early girls and one better boy. I wasn't sure if it was a worm or some kind of rot that developed from the flood waters. I have 2 early girls in one part of the garden, then another early girl (the one affected) right next to the better boy, and only that one seems affected. I started just picking them as soon as they started to turn a little from green. One I left on 'til it turned red, and sure enough, it was rotted as well.
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Old 08-09-2011, 11:30 AM   #62
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Nobody has mentioned Pico de Gallo!! Roma's are best, if you have them.
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Old 08-09-2011, 03:13 PM   #63
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Tomatoes Rockefeller
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Old 08-09-2011, 04:27 PM   #64
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TNT: Tomato Cobbler

Just. Yum. I don't know what else to even say about this...

Tomato Cobbler
Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything Vegetarian

8 to 10 medium red and yellow tomatoes, cored and cut into wedges
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Salt and pepper to taste
1 cup flour
1 cup cornmeal
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
4 tablespoons cold butter, cut into chunks
1 beaten egg
3/4 cup buttermilk
Kernels from a couple of ears of corn
1 cup cheese (I don't use this much, I like to use mozzarella & grated parm)

Put the tomato wedges and corn kernels into an oiled baking dish and toss them with the cornstarch and the salt and pepper.

Put the flour, cornmeal, baking powder and baking soda, as well as a teaspoon of salt, in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the butter and give it a few more pulses until it looks like coarse sand. Add the egg, buttermilk and grated cheese until the mixture comes together like a dough ball. Add a bit more flour if it's too wet or a bit more buttermilk if it's too dry. (I do mine by hand ... )

Drop the batter by spoonfuls on top of the tomatoes. Make sure that there are some cracks between the dough so steam escapes from the tomatoes as it cooks.

Bake for 45 to 50 minutes until the cobbler is golden brown and bubbling underneath. This tastes best best at room temperature, so making it in the morning when it's cool to serve later is a great idea.
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Old 08-09-2011, 05:03 PM   #65
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Boy that lasagna sounds great!.. I like the old favorite of min, sliced tomato with avocado over fresh mozzarella... Add a tad of finely chopped scallions, chopping into the green. Drizzle with olive oil, vinegar, squeeze of lemon. Season with white pepper, salt, garlic , fresh basil.. I like a tad of oregano. I am a oregano freak... Try it out if you like those ingredient. I will add different items at times . Depends on what's in the fridge. Capers, portabellas, etc.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:56 AM   #66
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OK, I have the following, and wish to make a sort of savory tomato tart. Puff pastry in the freezer, lots of tomatoes, some basil, and some fresh onions from the farmers' market. I'm mostly wondering if I should bake the pastry first and then add the slices of tomatoes. I'm afraid that if I put the tomatoes on the pastry and then bake, they'll make the crust soggy. I know you're supposed to pierce the part of the crust to be filled to keep it flat. I was thinking maybe brushing the pastry with olive oil, then a few very thin slices of the onion (a very small, very sweet onion), maybe a sprinkle of parm, then slices of onions after it is baked? No matter what, chiffonade of basil at the end. But would it be better to bake the tomatoes on the pastry? Anyone done something like this?
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Old 08-13-2011, 12:10 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
OK, I have the following, and wish to make a sort of savory tomato tart. Puff pastry in the freezer, lots of tomatoes, some basil, and some fresh onions from the farmers' market. I'm mostly wondering if I should bake the pastry first and then add the slices of tomatoes. I'm afraid that if I put the tomatoes on the pastry and then bake, they'll make the crust soggy. I know you're supposed to pierce the part of the crust to be filled to keep it flat. I was thinking maybe brushing the pastry with olive oil, then a few very thin slices of the onion (a very small, very sweet onion), maybe a sprinkle of parm, then slices of onions after it is baked? No matter what, chiffonade of basil at the end. But would it be better to bake the tomatoes on the pastry? Anyone done something like this?
Check out Kadesma's recipe on page 2 of this post. I made a similar one and it was sooo good!
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Old 08-13-2011, 04:17 PM   #68
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Claire, if it was me and you are baking the tomato filling, Bake it just like a quiche in a raw pastry. only blind bake if you are doing an unbaked filling.
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Old 08-15-2011, 02:35 PM   #69
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Why can I never find a site when I want it? I did retrieve this one ... and I don't know if I should put it under tomatoes or peppers. I made my first batch of roasted tomato sauce. I always toss in a pepper when I start roasting, they're usually "super cayennes", which are milder than regular cayennes. But I do experiment with a plant or two a year. Now I have this immensely hot tomato sauce. It is no big deal, I just put it in smaller freezer containers, and will mark it and put no peppers in other batches of tomato sauce, and blend. To all home growers, remember, peppers cross pollinate very easily. The pepper you loved in the spring may bite you on the butt in august!
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Old 08-15-2011, 02:42 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
Why can I never find a site when I want it? I did retrieve this one ... and I don't know if I should put it under tomatoes or peppers. I made my first batch of roasted tomato sauce. I always toss in a pepper when I start roasting, they're usually "super cayennes", which are milder than regular cayennes. But I do experiment with a plant or two a year. Now I have this immensely hot tomato sauce. It is no big deal, I just put it in smaller freezer containers, and will mark it and put no peppers in other batches of tomato sauce, and blend. To all home growers, remember, peppers cross pollinate very easily. The pepper you loved in the spring may bite you on the butt in august!
My Mint plants have cross pollinated and now I have 2 new types of mint
I enjoy seeing what happens so I plant my mint and peppers close to each other and see if new varieties come out of it. I have kept some planted far from each other to make sure I keep some of the originals and kept lots of seed
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