"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Culinary Gardener
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-29-2014, 10:38 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Same here. Better than potatoes, as far as I'm concerned.

Agree. I haven't had them in years, I'll have to get some again.
__________________

__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 06:04 AM   #12
Sous Chef
 
menumaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: South West France
Posts: 588
Cut into chunks and cook as advised above, drain and leave aside. Melt knob of butter
and similar amount of brown sugar until starting to bubble. Take off heat and fold in the drained turnips. Serve with a contrasting veg such as greens, spinach.
If mashing them with butter ( more butter, right on dawglover ) and black pepper, whisk in an egg. Believe me, it works, they are like velvet
__________________

__________________
Celtic cook

Life is like good wine.......best taken with friends x
menumaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 06:22 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,787
I like them in beef stew and pot roast. Haven't tried them mashed.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 06:37 AM   #14
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,005
It is common in the central New York state area where I grew up.

Thanksgiving was a harvest celebration, the farmers ate what they grew! My Father and my Grandmother used to enjoy looking around the table and pointing out all of the things that had grown in our garden. These days I look around the table and am thankful that I still have the strength, not to mention the money, to get everything home from the supermarket!

If the strong taste or texture of mashed turnips puts you off then add a couple if Irish potatoes to the pot and mash them together. I myself enjoy the mashed turnip with butter, salt and freshly ground black pepper.

I need to try whisking an egg into the finished product!

Also someone on this board gave me a tip about peeling the wax covered rutabagas. Cut the rutabaga in half then into approximately one inch slices, use a paring knife to peel the wax off of each slice. This is much easier and much safer for me than trying to peel the whole turnip!
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 07:24 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
It is common in the central New York state area where I grew up.

Thanksgiving was a harvest celebration, the farmers ate what they grew! My Father and my Grandmother used to enjoy looking around the table and pointing out all of the things that had grown in our garden. These days I look around the table and am thankful that I still have the strength, not to mention the money, to get everything home from the supermarket!

If the strong taste or texture of mashed turnips puts you off then add a couple if Irish potatoes to the pot and mash them together. I myself enjoy the mashed turnip with butter, salt and freshly ground black pepper.

I need to try whisking an egg into the finished product!

Also someone on this board gave me a tip about peeling the wax covered rutabagas. Cut the rutabaga in half then into approximately one inch slices, use a paring knife to peel the wax off of each slice. This is much easier and much safer for me than trying to peel the whole turnip!
I learned to peel them like that also. I cut mine from pole to pole like you would with an onion. Then you can cut each half into slices. The prep work on them goes so fast that way. I also learned that directly underneath the peeling, there is a very thin light strip. This strip is bitter and should be removed with the peeling. All you are left with is a sweet tasting veggie.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 10:30 AM   #16
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
The big yellow turnips that we always mashed are often called rutabagas in other parts of the country or swedes in other parts of the world.

We never mashed the white turnips. Are ya'll referring to the same thing, or did you mash white turnips?
__________________
In our house, dog hair is a condiment!
OMG! I decided to blog!
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 10:48 AM   #17
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
...If the strong taste or texture of mashed turnips puts you off then add a couple if Irish potatoes to the pot...

What is an Irish potato?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 10:50 AM   #18
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
The big yellow turnips that we always mashed are often called rutabagas in other parts of the country or swedes in other parts of the world.

We never mashed the white turnips. Are ya'll referring to the same thing, or did you mash white turnips?
We always mashed white and purple turnips, using the same method as with potatoes. Cut into large dice, boil, drain, and mash.

Rutabagas/swedes are actually not true turnips, but a cross between turnips and cabbages. We used to have those mashed as well.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 11:08 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
What is an Irish potato?
The family of potatoes

One night, the Potato family sat down to dinner--Mother Potato and her three daughters. Midway through the meal, the eldest daughter spoke up. "Mother Potato?" she said. "I have an announcement to make."

"And what might that be?" said Mother, seeing the obvious excitement in her eldest daughter's eyes.

"Well," replied the daughter, with a proud but sheepish grin, "I'm getting married!"

The other daughters squealed with surprise as Mother Potato exclaimed, "Married! That's wonderful! And who are you marrying, Eldest daughter?"

"I'm marrying a Russet!"

"A Russet!" replied Mother Potato with pride.

"Oh, a Russet is a fine tater, a fine tater indeed!"

As the family shared in the eldest daughter's joy, the middle daughter spoke up. "Mother? I, too, have an announcement."

"And what might that be?" encouraged Mother Potato.

Not knowing quite how to begin, the middle daughter paused, then said with conviction, "I, too, am getting married!"

"You, too!" Mother Potato said with joy. "That's wonderful! Twice the good news in one evening! And who are you marrying, Middle Daughter?"

"I'm marrying an Idaho!" beamed the middle daughter.

"An Idaho!" said Mother Potato with joy. "Oh, an Idaho is a fine tater, a fine tater indeed!"

Once again, the room came alive with laughter and excited plan for the future, when the youngest Potato daughter interrupted. "Mother? Mother Potato? Um, I, too, have an announcement to make."

"Yes?" said Mother Potato with great anticipation.

"Well," began the youngest Potato daughter with the same sheepish grin as her eldest sister before her, "I hope this doesn't come as a shock to you, but I am getting married, as well!"

"Really?" said Mother Potato with sincere excitement. "All of my lovely daughters married! What wonderful news! And who, pray tell, are you marrying, Youngest Daughter?"

"I'm marrying Peter Jennings!"

"Peter Jennings?!" Mother Potato scowled suddenly. "But he's just a common tater!"

To make a long story short, an Irish potato is just a common tater!
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 12:29 PM   #20
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
...To make a long story short, an Irish potato is just a common tater!

Such as an all-purpose white potato??
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.