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Old 05-20-2012, 01:11 PM   #151
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Checking the garden closely today, it seems that zucchini season has begun. last weekend, these were mostly blossoms. I think we'll begin with sauteed zucchini and pasta for lunch today.

(Kathleen was quite....um.... moved.)
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Old 05-20-2012, 02:44 PM   #152
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Checking the garden closely today, it seems that zucchini season has begun. last weekend, these were mostly blossoms. I think we'll begin with sauteed zucchini and pasta for lunch today.

(Kathleen was quite....um.... moved.)
+1
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Old 05-20-2012, 04:53 PM   #153
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I have to get up off my arse. My garden is full of weeds. I can hardly see the three potato plants.
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Old 05-21-2012, 10:15 AM   #154
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I intensely dislike weeding.

Starting in the fall, I'm going to see about going to no irrigation for 90 percent of my garden, watering only those things that absolutely need frequent water (lettuce). One of the benefits is that, when planted for non-irrigation, the plants are set far enough apart that the tiller can run between them, taking care of the weeds and the necessary fluffing of the surface soil. I've been reading Steve Solomon and realized that it's nothing more than dryland farming, but with the planting done so that the deeper moisture isn't exhausted, rather than the intensive commercial dryland farm that depends on lucky rains and fails completely if it doesn't rain.

You have to have a lot of ground to do it, because of the wide spacing, and I have that. I also got, with the John Deere 140 1971 garden tractor I bought, a tiller attachment and a soil pulverizer, both of which will maintain the "dust mulch." The whole concept makes sense, and I regularly see commercial fields doing well without rain or irrigation until the extremely close planting exhausts the subsurface water.

Here's the short book on the subject:

Gardening Without Irrigation: or without much, anyway by Steve Solomon - Project Gutenberg

Also looking into huglekultur.

raised garden beds: hugelkultur instead of irrigation
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:14 AM   #155
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We have our first silverbeet plants up and should be ready to start harvesting in another 10-14 days. The snow peas and beans are going well about the same till harvest. We are about to build our first raised vege bed. We are using bales of hay ted together to form the border, 5 each side one across, then I think I will try the suggestion above and collect the various dead wood around our acre and put that at the bottom to mulch down. I've heard unbleached wet cardboard attracts worms so a few packing boxes in then topsoil n mulch. I think we will grow beans over the autumn winter period to mulch into the gardens come spring planting. Any suggestions will be helpful. Also let the chooks in as CWS does to enrich our soil and weed it too before spring.
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:16 AM   #156
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By the way we have a gray water system - just a holding tank for water used in the shower, washing machine and kitchen sink. I was thinking of putting a drip feed hose into the centre of the layers of garden so this can water it. Any suggestions or advice?
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:23 AM   #157
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On weekend visited my grandma
and in the garden there were
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:27 AM   #158
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Nice Nikita
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:46 AM   #159
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
I intensely dislike weeding.

Starting in the fall, I'm going to see about going to no irrigation for 90 percent of my garden, watering only those things that absolutely need frequent water (lettuce). One of the benefits is that, when planted for non-irrigation, the plants are set far enough apart that the tiller can run between them, taking care of the weeds and the necessary fluffing of the surface soil. I've been reading Steve Solomon and realized that it's nothing more than dryland farming, but with the planting done so that the deeper moisture isn't exhausted, rather than the intensive commercial dryland farm that depends on lucky rains and fails completely if it doesn't rain.

You have to have a lot of ground to do it, because of the wide spacing, and I have that. I also got, with the John Deere 140 1971 garden tractor I bought, a tiller attachment and a soil pulverizer, both of which will maintain the "dust mulch." The whole concept makes sense, and I regularly see commercial fields doing well without rain or irrigation until the extremely close planting exhausts the subsurface water.

Here's the short book on the subject:

Gardening Without Irrigation: or without much, anyway by Steve Solomon - Project Gutenberg

Also looking into huglekultur.

raised garden beds: hugelkultur instead of irrigation
Except for the "little" garden, we plant all of the gardens so that we can get the tiller between rows. Otherwise, we'd spend dawn until dusk weeding, 7 days a week.
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:47 AM   #160
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On weekend visited my grandma
and in the garden there were
Lovely!
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