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Old 05-21-2012, 12:24 PM   #161
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By the way we have a gray water system - just a holding tank for water used in the shower, washing machine and kitchen sink. I was thinking of putting a drip feed hose into the centre of the layers of garden so this can water it. Any suggestions or advice?
If you mean the huglekultur garden, I think it's essentially a wood composter at heart. And it's supposed to be very good at holding water over long periods and is considered a low water consumption method. I suspect any steady feed of gray water might be too much water. Makes the thing a slimy mess of rot, rather than the decomposition you want. I know people in very rainy areas often have to roof their compost pile.
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Old 05-21-2012, 12:34 PM   #162
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We haven't had the problem of too dry of a summer lately. Since 2008, our summers have been a bit wet. We do mulch the small garden to keep the weeds down. We start with feed sacks, 5" of grass clippings, and then we top up with sawdust and grass clippings through the summer. The grass clippings return nitrogen to the soil, the sawdust depletes nitrogen (which is why it is the top layer). Why sawdust? Because we have a sawmill. We also use sawdust to store the root vegetables in the root cellar. I've used grass clippings since the early '90s. I don't notice that I have more weeds as a result.
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Old 05-21-2012, 12:48 PM   #163
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I just bought some thyme, basil,, oregano, Italian parsley, chocolate mint and dill, all in pots.
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Old 05-23-2012, 03:13 PM   #164
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The beans we planted 10 days ago are up (they were starting to come up on Sunday). The winter squash is up, the sweet corn is up (that garden isn't fenced--hoping the hens don't notice it--the plan is to move them this weekend). Radishes are eatin' size. The kohlrabi is also up and about 4 inches tall. The weeds are up. I have to put in some tomatoes, peppers, and leeks. Then I guess I'll tackle weeds.
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Old 05-23-2012, 05:42 PM   #165
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The tomatoes are in bloom and have a few maters, sun flowers getting ready, strawberries going full tilt, all the herbs are producing,zucchini's have flowers and zukes albeit small ones,peppers are in and have taken root,lemon,orange,tangerines have flowered and have small tiny fruit in progress, pomegranate has about 4 fruits on it.corn is about up to my knees, cantaloupe and watermelons growing. We've used up all the lettuce and beansartichokes have about 10 more growing bigger and about ready to be picked and marinated then grilled. Need to go out and look and see what else is ready to harvest.
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Old 05-23-2012, 05:55 PM   #166
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In many ways, a garden is like a rooster--you have to feed it, care for it, and it takes time to realize a benefit.
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:19 PM   #167
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In many ways, a garden is like a rooster--you have to feed it, care for it, and it takes time to realize a benefit.
Your right CWS, but thank goodness it doesn't attack you!
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Old 05-24-2012, 05:02 AM   #168
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Your right CWS, but thank goodness it doesn't attack you!
Then you don't have one of the weeds I have. It's a vine that sticks to anything that goes near it.
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Old 05-24-2012, 05:48 AM   #169
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Then you don't have one of the weeds I have. It's a vine that sticks to anything that goes near it.
What is that sticky weed?? I hate it--it is in the small garden--the one we mulch. I'm hoping the feed sacks under the mulch and staying on top of the weeding will help this year.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:00 AM   #170
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What is that sticky weed?? I hate it--it is in the small garden--the one we mulch. I'm hoping the feed sacks under the mulch and staying on top of the weeding will help this year.
Mine is in a patch of yard I've given over to wild-flowers -- mostly the tall version of phlox and what is called here "ditch lilies". I have a walk-way through the area and the darned things stick to everything. I'd like to keep the lilies and phlox, so Roundup is out of the question. They aren't hard to pull, and they don't hurt, they're just a p-a, and they do attack! Since the garden is one I prefer to let go a little wild (concentrating on my little vegetable, herb, and flower stuff), I really don't want to get seriously into mulching and weeding. When the stuff gets out of control, I pull it out. But it is as if it is magnetic and made of velcro!
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