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Old 09-01-2008, 01:09 PM   #51
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Here a pic of my stub and the bush closest to it....I tried to get as close as possible so you can see the leaves, you can't see it in the pic but by alot of leaves there are little red bumps at the stem of several leaves, to me they look like buds? my camera isn't the best
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Old 09-01-2008, 02:28 PM   #52
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Deelady, it looks like he hard cut that poor thing. Again, never more than 1/3. I originally didn't understand we were talking about 2 different rose plants. OMG! I wouldn't trim the little girl again, just to play it safe, But we'll talk later in the sprin. But yes, on the big girl. Mulch the 'baby' good around base, (I do see some mulch, make sure it's 3-4" deep) before your frost. Just for your info though, not all roses bloom more than once a year and others are everblooming, meaning perpetual, through the growing season.
Both Deelady & B'sgirl, go to this site:
Plants, plant gardening and everything plant related. to try to identify your particular roses. When you go, click 'search', then click 'advanced search' and B'sgirl, type in 'white rose' and it will list all white roses. Just scroll down to ones that say white with pink edges and click on that breed for photo and description.
Deelady, you do the same for your color.
Ladies, Let us know which you think you have. Then you can find out more specificly how to take care of them and what traits they have.

B'sgirl, I swear (sorry- no swearing allow) yours look like 2 different flower types. Interesting difference in pics.



Your photo from 6/27/08

Your photo from 8/30/08

After checking the site, isn't it amazing how many there are just in your color catagory?
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Old 09-04-2008, 02:29 PM   #53
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Well, I think mine is some kind of hybrid tea. I couldn't find the right coloring on that list, but here's the closest I could find. What do you think? I'm not sure what "armed with thorns" means, but it has some long, nasty thorns that make you swell in the area when they scratch you. They aren't all over the place though, I would say it's a "moderately thorny" bush, if that makes sense. I remember the first blossoms of the year were like the second picture. The next set were like the first picture, and when it bloomed again it was like the second again. Could that be because it's a hybrid?
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Old 09-08-2008, 10:31 AM   #54
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Hi, B's. Just seeing this and your latest post.
Here's what I think........
I don't think it's a Hazel McCallion. They are a 'mini flora', which are best for containers. Check the size. Yours is too big for that. Also, they are perpetual bloomers, and yours is a twice bloomer. They say it has a mild fragrance like green tea. Does yours smell like that? Also says it has lots and lots of thorns. Yours? My guess is it's some kind of Jackson Perkins, bought at one of the Big Box stores in your area. I'll keep looking to see if I can figure your out. I love a good mystery. That is, unless you find it first.
The fall is a good time to go there and see if you can find it....and buy more, sometimes discounted late in the season - before frost, so you can plant for next season blooms. It may not have blooms, just some canes that you should cut back 1/3. But the rewards will be worth it. Again, keep us posted.


Availability:
Commercially available

Synonyms:
Hazel McCallion
MANhazel

ARS Reg:
Pink blend Mini-Flora.
Registration name: MANhazel
Exhibition name: Hazel McCallion, Hazel McCallion

Origin:
Bred in Canada (2007) by George Mander.

Class:
Mini-Flora.

Bloom:
Pink and white. Mild fragrance. 25 to 30 petals. Average diameter 3". Medium, full (26-40 petals), exhibition, hybrid tea, in small clusters, reflexed bloom form. Prolific, continuous (perpetual) bloom throughout the season. Medium buds.

Habit:
Medium, bushy growth habit. Medium, semi-glossy, dark green foliage. 3 to 5 leaflets.
Height of 25" to 30" (65 to 75 cm). Width of 15" to 20". (40 to 50 cm).

Growing:
USDA zone 5b and warmer . Used for beds and borders, container rose, cut flower, exhibition or garden. Vigorous. benefits from winter protection in colder climates. requires full sun for best color. Disease susceptibility: disease resistant, blackspot resistant, mildew resistant, rust resistant. Remove spent blooms to encourage re-bloom. Spring Pruning: Remove old canes and dead or diseased wood and cut back canes that cross. In warmer climates, cut back the remaining canes by about one-third. In colder areas, you'll probably find you'll have to prune a little more than that. Can be grown in the ground or in a container (container requires winter protection). Feed this rose well. Needs little care; relatively disease-free and quite hardy. Prune dead wood. Prune lightly until this rose gets established (about two years), then prune it back by about a third.. Remove spent blooms only.

Breeder's notes:
Formerly my test rose under 'MAN 2/01
Jan. 24th 2008, registration application 'Hazel McCallion' submitted to IRAR and excepted.
Nov.28th 2006 : This rose may be available in fall of 2007 at Hortico.
"MORE INFO" to follow later on.

Parentage:
Hot Tamale Rubies 'n' Pearls

Notes:
This rose is named for Mississauga, Ontario, Canada's locally revered and internationally honored Mayor, Hazel McCallion. She is 85 years old and has been Mayor of Mississauga since 1978.
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Old 09-08-2008, 08:53 PM   #55
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Well it looks like the pic at the top of this page that is a stump with leaves growing out in fact is a weed and not my roses coming back to life!! Its much bigger now after the rain and the leasves have gotten quite big...def not a rose leaf! Oh well, I guess I'll just dip the whole area up and plant a new one. Best time for that is Spring right? Also it looks my my climbing rose bush might be getting a couple of buds....should I just let them be? I swear I didn't give them any more food! I've was told recently we should still have warmish weather up to next month.
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Old 09-09-2008, 07:30 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deelady View Post
Well it looks like the pic at the top of this page that is a stump with leaves growing out in fact is a weed and not my roses coming back to life!! Its much bigger now after the rain and the leasves have gotten quite big...def not a rose leaf! Oh well, I guess I'll just dip the whole area up and plant a new one. Best time for that is Spring right? Also it looks my my climbing rose bush might be getting a couple of buds....should I just let them be? I swear I didn't give them any more food! I've was told recently we should still have warmish weather up to next month.
Oh, that's funny (about the weed) deelady. Live and learn.
Yeh. I guess you have to dig it up. You can find good deals on summer 'leftover' plants now - or maybe in a couple of weeks, as the plants won't have blooms, just canes and not too attractive. You'll have to rely on the hang tags attached to see breed and habits and color. Plant no higher than base of canes and twice as wide, watering in well. Put some blood meal in the hole just before you set plant in the hole. Make sure you mulch around the base before your first frost. Read the tags. The tag will tell you specific instructions for your zone/area of the country.
As far as your existing plant, leave it alone for now if it's budding. You still have about a month before your frost, no? As the buds died back, trim the whole cane down
1/3, but no more than that. Make sure you mulch this one too. As it blooms, take pics, so we can try to figure out what you have. And remember to look at the tags in your nursery for this plant. Maybe you'll get lucky identifying it.
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Old 09-09-2008, 09:49 AM   #57
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It looks like spider mites to me, especially since you saw tiny dots under the leaves and (gasp) spider webs. Note: the webs will be very tiny, and if you look closely, will have some of those "tiny dots" moving around in them.

Spider mites are not killed by insecticidal soap or much else, as they multiply so quickly that while you are treating one plant, they move to the next, and soon the others around them have mites (like your strawberry plant). The circle can continue widening until you have a lot more casualties than just the original plant. As for the blooms on your rose, often plants continue to bloom when they're under stress...it's as if they're trying to reproduce before they die.

I ran commercial greenhouses for 22 years, and learned from experience to weed out the one plant rather than lose everything in the greenhouse.
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Old 09-18-2008, 07:24 PM   #58
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goodness I hope it's not spider mites........to be sure take a leaf and flick it with your thumb and middle finger over a piece of white paper.......then look carefully .......if you're my age get your specs........if anything is moving treat them ASAP...spider mites are marauders and killers,,,,,,,,,,they suck the life out of anything and aren't easy to get rid of .........don't mess around with them
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Old 09-18-2008, 07:28 PM   #59
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Constance, my exact sentiments..........:)
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Old 09-20-2008, 03:10 PM   #60
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I don't think it was spider mites. Although I cleared everything out of that garden except for the rosebush anyway. I wanted to start over because I didn't like the look of it. The bush is doing well though. I just gave it the "fall trim" because the nights are getting pretty cold here, and it was pretty much done blooming. I need to do one more round of rose food/anti fungus treatment and then I think I'll leave it be until spring.
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