"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-22-2014, 12:14 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Boston
Posts: 1
Colorblind Cooking: Ground Raw Meats, Help?

Hi there,

I'm brand new to cooking meat and this forum. I'm colorblind and am usually unable to tell the difference between red and brown (or at least, that seems to be the case with ground beef.) Overall, I don't want to rely on color when browning meat, and having people say things like "just feel for the consistency" and "go by smell" have been demotivating, since I'm not exactly sure what the ideal is. Again, I'm experienced with cooking, but not with meat (was a vegetarian until very recently.) I've also had food poisoning, so I don't want to rely on my own inexperienced instincts right now, or what I would evaluate to be "crumbly" or things like that.

I've tried to find this online but haven't yet- I need a guide for how long I need to cook different types of meat, on what types of flame (I'm mostly interested in how to fry ground meats at this point, but cooking times would be useful for other types of meat and cooking styles as well I suppose.)

Does this exist, or would anybody be willing to summarize this for me? Basically, how long I need to fry ground beef, ground turkey, ground veal, and ground pork on what sort of heat before it's done? Recipes usually just say "brown the beef" so looking up recipes has been unhelpful for me too.

Thanks in advance
-A very frustrated colorblind cook who wants to learn to cook meat

__________________

__________________
doesthingswithstuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 12:44 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,032
Welcome to DC. I am sure someone will come along to answer your questions. We have plenty of folks here who are willing to help.

Color blind? That has to be one of life's most inconvenient maladies.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 12:49 PM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,358
Hello and welcome to DC.

I had not considered the problems color-blind cooks deal with.

It's really difficult to tell you what burner settings and times to use as there are too many variables. Power of the burner, size of the pan and how much meat you put in at once, etc.

With ground beef you cannot tell the difference between red and brown. Try this. When ground beef first hits heat it turns light brown/grey-similar to red in shade. As it cooks and gets hotter, it becomes a darker brown, similar to dark chocolate. That's the key to really browning beef (and lamb).

Ground pork offers a similar possibility as it's almost white when it starts to cook but turns brown (dark) when it's done.

Color changes in poultry are not as obvious as it starts out light and changes opacity more than color. Once again, a darker color (browning) is a sure indicator it's ready.

I hope this is of some help.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 12:51 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
Hi, and welcome to Discuss Cooking

All ground meats will be fully cooked after about 10 minutes of cooking over medium-high heat. Use a spatula to break up and turn the meat as it cooks to ensure that it cooks thoroughly. Also, keep in mind that ground meats are usually then cooked even longer in the recipe. For example, ground beef for tacos is browned, then water and seasonings added, and then it's simmered another 8-10 minutes to infuse the meat with the flavor.

Let us know if you have more questions.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 12:54 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
When you want to cook chops, steaks or roasts, follow the directions on the recipe and get a good thermometer. That's the best way to determine when meats are cooked to the temperature you want - you don't always want it well-done. With larger cuts, there are a lot of variables that make it difficult to give times for cooking, other than guidelines.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 12:57 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
I was assuming one pound of meat and a 10-inch (at least) stainless steel skillet or sauté pan.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 01:45 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California's Big Valley
Posts: 810
Unless you have the same stove and cooking vessels that I have, I don't think I can be much help in suggesting timing for cooking anything. However I can say there are charts that give the answers as to what temperatures reflect the done-ness of meat. Hamburger is probably "done" at 160 - 165 degrees. There inexpensive instant read thermometers that work great.
__________________
Oldvine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 01:50 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,096
Welcome to DC! As mentioned, a thermometer is your friend. Also, this lady might have some ideas for you: http://www.theblindcook.com
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 03:36 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
It's not easy to measure the temperature of loose ground beef in a pan But I don't think it's all that complicated. Ten minutes over medium-high heat will do it.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 08:15 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,303
Welcome to DC! My brother is red-green colour blind and has problems with brown. I can ask him how he knows when the ground meat is done. He does a fair amount of cooking. I am away this weekend, but can call him Monday if you'd like. Ten minutes is a good guide for ground meat that is broken up. For burgers, well, hmmm...your thermometer is your best friend.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cook, cooking, meat, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.