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Old 08-01-2006, 02:57 PM   #31
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You can use any liquids in my method. BBQ sauce and beer will work.

A dutch oven and a crock pot is electric and stays on the counter while the dutch oven goes in the oven.

You can do this recipe in either a crock pot or in a dutch oven.


Mix the liquids then add to the pot. Doesn't matter if you pour it ofver the meat or not.

The dutch oven must be covered throughout the process to keep the liquids from evaporating and drying out the meat.

For Q #3, you need a little liquid along with the onions and steak.
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:25 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
For Q #3, you need a little liquid along with the onions and steak.
thanks mate, i guess that question was poorly worded, i meant is it okay to throw the onions in when the pan is still scorching hot from the sear, or should i let the pan cool after i sear the meat, then add the onions, in case the onions burn and taste funky...

Thanks for the advice. Im gonna go buy a crockpot tommorow.
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:43 PM   #33
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A crock pot is just an electric stewpot -- it's like cooking on top of the stove in a large covered pot, only it's electric and sits on the counter. Personally, I don't care for them, but many people like them.

Their main advantage is that you can throw your stew ingredients in it in the morning, turn it on, and have your dinner ready when you come home from work, assuming you're comfortable leaving it on all day unattended. I've had stuff burn badly in crock pots -- problem probably was the recipe, not the crock pot.

Also, you can't really brown a roast in a crock pot, and that's essential for good flavor, IMHO.

As for cooking at 250, that should be OK, but I think you'll find that a little higher temperature (300 to 325) for a shorter time will give you the same results. The main thing is to be sure the meat is thoroughly cooked.
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Old 08-01-2006, 10:27 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
thanks mate, i guess that question was poorly worded, i meant is it okay to throw the onions in when the pan is still scorching hot from the sear, or should i let the pan cool after i sear the meat, then add the onions, in case the onions burn and taste funky...

Thanks for the advice. Im gonna go buy a crockpot tommorow.
You need some fat for the onions to cook. If you take the meat out of the pan and add some fat (oil or butter) then toss in the onions, the pan will cool down pretty quick. You don't have to cook them for long if you are going to put them into a dutch oven or crockpot.

For me, the benefit of using a dutch oven over a crock pot is the ability to do the searing in the same utensil you use for the braising in the oven. That way it's easier to keep the fond in the recipe without deglazing the searing pan and adding the deglazed liquids to a crock pot. Also, you have one less pot to clean.
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Old 08-01-2006, 11:36 PM   #35
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Andy it sounds like a dutch oven is the way to go.

I can't wait to try this out.

Does a chuck roast have to be trimmed?

Also, what areas of the chuck roast will i need to cut around when it's done cooking? does the fat kind of melt in it? I'm very meticulous about trimming fat. I trim pretty much every piece i see from my chicken, steak, and pork.


Basically i want to make a pot roast with the type of meat LEAST LIKELY to have chunks of gristle or fat that will give me a gross bite i will have to spit out.

Any suggestions on what piece of meat would suit my needs the best?

2lbs would be nice, but 3lbs-4lbs is no biggie. the meat can't be that expensive if it does happen to go to waste.
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Old 08-02-2006, 08:56 AM   #36
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A chuck roast can contain several muscles tied together. there will be some gristle in between. A lot of the fat will cook out but will be part of the liquid in the pot. If that's a problem, you'll have to defat the liquid.

Also good are bottom round and eye round roasts. Less fat and gristle to deal with.

If you do any trimming, I'd wait to do it after cooking. The fat contributres to the flavor. Then you can trim it off so it doesn't get to your mouth.
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Old 08-02-2006, 11:26 AM   #37
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Is it easy to spot andy?
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Old 08-02-2006, 11:57 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
Is it easy to spot andy?
Trimming off the fat should be easy. Yoou would have no problem see it as different from the meat. You have a nice sharp knife so it will be relatively easy to do.

Melted fat in the gravy will float to the top. You can skim that off too. Also, you can use a fat separator. It's a measuring cup looking thing with a spout that comes from the very bottom of the cup. You pour the liquid into the container and the fat rises to the top in a couple of minutes. Then you pour off the gravy under the fat.
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Old 08-02-2006, 03:29 PM   #39
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all of that beef fat will drain into the BBQ sauce and beer and make for a delicious gravy right? Even if i skim it?

Also, with the BBQ and Beer method, would celery and carrots still go good or should i just use onions?
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Old 08-02-2006, 03:37 PM   #40
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There can be a lot of fat in the gravy, depending on the cut of meat. Even if you remove the floating fat, there is still a lot of fat dissolved in the gravy to provide flavor.

You can go with all three veggies or just the onions.
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