"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-05-2005, 09:50 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 147
Cooking (broil) time for .9 lb ny strip?

It's dry rubbin in the fridge right now..... about to go under the heat... Just figured I'd check with you experts on cooking time, rather than guess-and-****-up like I usually do... :)

It's .9lb, bout 3/4 inch thick. Store guy said it was special - aged like 21 days or somethin - we'll see about that - lol

I'm looking for something between med and med-rare. I like juices n flavor n all, but definitely not raw... I don't have a thermometer :(

And I got the world's biggest baking potato - looks to be 2x as big as the steak - lol

thanks!

__________________

__________________
sherifffruitfly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2005, 10:06 PM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: New Buffalo, Michigan
Posts: 954
Send a message via Yahoo to Erik
Maybe 7-8 minutes per side. Can you tell your temps by the feeling the center of the meat.

Use Your Palm To Read Your Steaks:

You can poke the meat and judge its degree of doneness by comparing it to the feel of a particular place on your palm.

The pad at the base of the thumb is equivalent to a rare steak.
The middle of the palm is equivalent to a medium steak.
The base below the little finger is a signature for well-done. Don't be afraid to poke your steak, and if still in doubt cut into it with a knife to visually check the degree of doneness.
Technique:

Cook the steak quickly to sear in maximum juices.
The more the meat is handled the more the juices and flavor are lost.
Do not use a fork; always use tongs to turn a steak.
Do not turn more than once; cook one side at a time.
Thicker cuts may need to be seared and then finished to desired degree of doneness using indirect heat.
When in doubt, cut into the meat to visually check the doneness. When it is almost, but not quite, done to your liking, pull it off the grill and let it sit for 2 - 3 minutes, it will continue cooking off the grill and be done to perfection. Trial and error is needed to be able to judge the timing for your perfect steak.

Hope this'll help ya!!!!!!
__________________

__________________
Erik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2005, 11:06 PM   #3
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Erik is giving some pretty darned good advice, here!

I will give my "thought" such as it is...

If you are baking a potato or potato's that big, its going to take an hour in the oven, at 400 degrees, perhaps slightly hotter if you are using an electric oven, on "bake" function...ie the potato's on the lowest rack, and the heat coming from the bottom...in a perfect world, turn them over with tongs, halfway through...

We are going to want to broil the steaks, given the 3/4" thickness, on a broiling pan, on a rack at the very top of the oven...(so make sure you have your oven racks set up right when you "start" the potato's!)

Coincidentally, 21 days aging is what I would call "minimal"...you might want to abandon the "dry rub" method, and try this instead...

Mix a third cup of EVOO, with 2 tbspns of minced garlic, a dash of hot sauce, a tbspn of Worcestshire, and a quarter cup of mesquite BBQ sauce together, and flop your steak in through that, both sides, allowing it to marinate while the potato (s) cook...flipping it when you turn the spuds...

(This works so well on a BBQ, too!)

Remove your potato's and set aside...

Preheat broiling element (max out the temp!) to fully red and pop in your steak(s) on the grilling pan...for medium rare, cook precisely five minutes, and then "flip" them...cook another five minutes, then remove the steaks and pan, and allow to "rest" for five minutes...drizzle with the drippings...and serve...

(Mind, Erik is perfectly correct in punching the meat with your thumb to test "doneness") I prefer the meat being "salted" with Hy's Seasoning Salt, either immediately before, or immediately after cooking, presently, my vote is for "after"...if you cannot access "Hy's", try Kosher Salt and fresh ground pepper with a bit of paprika...

One final point...I believe the meat should be allowed to reach "room temperature" or so before being offered up to the grill...its hard to evenly cook and unevenly thawed piece of meat...even if that meat is only "chilled"...

I stand to be corrected by the pro's on line here...but this is more or less "my method"...

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2005, 11:11 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: New Buffalo, Michigan
Posts: 954
Send a message via Yahoo to Erik
Lifter...even though I'm a "Pro"...you give some good advice, and seem very savvy about your food.
__________________
Erik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2005, 11:29 PM   #5
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Thanks very much Erik!

Sadly steaks are the "simplest thing to "figure out" after "eating from the "Pro's"!....even if your Mom never told you how to bake a potato (mine did!)...

Its a lot harder to replicatethe really "good" "pro's" efforts in "lesser cuts", or veggie "tricks", getting the pairings, etc...

Other than that, I've been taught to "cheat" a bit with both an uncle and FIL who were really good butchers and meat inspectors who could give "great" advice on what to look for...have taken a few classes with professional chefs and butchers on various "recipes" if not "concepts"...and of course, i both love to eat, and enjoy it even more, if the people I'm cooking it for "love" it better!

But trust me, I learn a heck of a lot on this column!

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2005, 01:10 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 147
Holy crap - you guys rock! lol

I might just have steak again tomorrow, and do some of the stuff you guys talked about! Yum!

Q: Is microwaving a potato really bad? Cmon - say it isn't awful - it only takes 10 minutes!

Comment: Put too much sugar in the rub - was a little hint of sweet on the steak. On the other hand, it tasted really good - and the juices were awesome with a lil suger in it! Rub was basically montreal stuff with red/black pepper. Worked well with the sugar.

Comment: One day I'll learn how to broil a hunk of meat on a rack further away from the heat. Was not done enuff in the middle, and too done on the outside. Almost looked like seared ahi - LOL. Broiling further from the heat should fix this, no?

Was super yumyum tho! God I love steak....

Thanks guys!
__________________
sherifffruitfly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2005, 02:33 AM   #7
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Well, okay, it may as well be "me" to reply!

First...microwaving...

"Just because you can 'cook' a potato in the microwave does NOT make it 'right'...(like, "why not the steak "next" in the microwave"?)

Yes, "Microwaving" ANYTHING is really bad...most unhealthfull, you can get back to me on "why" just take my word on this...

"Steak" is pretty "sweet" on its own...dunno about Erik, but you'll get an argument from me, in that you plainly desire your meat "done" a bit more than you are 'getting", and the sugars would over-carmelise...in my opinion...

and "EEEEEK!"...

Just because it isn't "done" to your desire on the inside, "PPPUUULLLEASSSE" do not ruin good meat by "baking" it!!!

Try splashing an ounce of vermouth or Jack Daniels ovr it after the 5th or sixth minute, and keeping it absolutely "jammed" against the heat source...(the liquere" effect will be to "crisp" the outside of the meat, where you will REALLY appreciate the juicy tenderness 'inside') and maybe the 6th moment will give you the "doneness" you want, which sounds more like "medium" or "medium-well" to me...

Pull the steak away from the burner at your own "waste" or "peril"!...you will be walking into the "path of the "damned"...who condemn "good meat", where you could just "surrender" and do it like its developed, over so many millenia"...

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2005, 09:25 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
PA Baker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA, Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,000
sheriff, I ditto what Lifter said but also wanted to add that part of why your steak may have looked so burnt on the outside is because of the sugar in your rub. The heat caused it to caramelize. Removing some from the rub, plus not cooking quite as close to the heat source should fix this.

I do agree with Lifter that there are better ways of cooking than in the microwave, but I also want to add that if that is what time allows you to do, than do it. A microwave-cooked baked potato is better than some fast-food fries. I prefer baking mine in the oven, but do resort to the nuker on occasion when I want one and am pressed for time. Home cooking is better than no cooking!
__________________
-A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand
PA Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2005, 12:16 AM   #9
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
P A Baker has "aced" this point...the quantities of sugars in the rub are burning under the "intense heat" desired to "sear" the steak meat, leaving you with some form of "coal" to choke through...and "burning" the rest of the spiing isn't exactly "helping" the flavouring, either...

Note that when we "cook" on a BBQ, about the last thing that goes on, in "high heat" scenarios is the sugary BBQ sauce...

My "wet marinade" posted some lines back, is "predominantly" EVOO, and this just adds a ton...I understand this is a "variation" of how the "Keg" chain, "does" their steaks...on the BBQ the oil allows the fiery grill to burn the "stripes" across the meat (shift it for the "x" patterning, to a heated but unused portion of the grill)(don't "flip it" early!)...but the other stuff really adds a lot, and you can extend the marinading time if you are using a tougher cut of steak...the "advice" was given" for T-Bone, strip loin, tenderloin, etc... add a bit as the steaks grow "tougher" (and yes, this includes even Sirloin!)

Now for the Micro-waving thing...

(and yes I saw that post "Don't let Lifter find out you did this")

A quick and cheap "experiment" with "life"...take a package of "fertile" seeds (ie those that will probably 'sprout', if planted)...

Divide into two groups...

Plant them both in ideal circumstances...

"water" the first group with "water", out of the tap, that has been heated to boiling in a microwave....call this "Group A"

Water the others with tap water, or even water boiled in a kettle....

Obviously let the heated water cool...we aren't trying to make porridge in either case...(and this will be "Group B")

You will find that Group "A" will not sprout or live..and Group "B" will grow and "prosper"...

I passed this on to "Audeo" some time ago, with the "scientific" back-up, and she was pretty sceptical, after reading through the research, but replicated the various experiments involved, and found out I was in fact "correct"...microwaving water (the core ingredient of most "food") "changes" its molecular structure, and makes it "less" good for you, even if "science" has not Quantified this, just yet...but even "Audeo" agrees that microwaved food is not neccessarily "good" for you...even if "everyone"'s got a microwave..

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2005, 12:30 AM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: New Buffalo, Michigan
Posts: 954
Send a message via Yahoo to Erik
Lifter...you rock!!!

I wanna say a lot of things about techniques, and methods that people use, but I'm afraid since, I prepare food in a management position, where I give insight to others who cook. They don't take teaching, or instruction well, even if they ask for it.

I don't wanna be persecuted here, like I do at work. So I kinda let others teach, if possible.
__________________

__________________
Erik is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Artichoke Risotto GB Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 13 03-19-2005 05:47 PM
Cooking a Beef Tenderloin Roast for first time... suedanielle Beef 6 01-01-2005 08:25 PM
Tex and Mex mudbug International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 4 09-22-2004 02:49 PM
Cooking time for lasagna shariedekorte Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 7 08-12-2004 01:52 AM
Cooking a sirloin roast...time table lunitunez Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison 5 02-27-2003 12:15 AM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.