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Old 03-04-2014, 07:25 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
We have been frying our bacon in the oven now for a couple years. We used to fry it on the stove top.
I have a cast iron griddle I keep in the oven (space reasons).
When we want bacon we preheat our oven with the CI griddle inside. Then lay out the bacon on it and turn one time.
We buy thick bacon so it takes about 15-20 minutes at 350. Much easier than frying and less mess.
Nice to be able to put it in and do other things beside babysitting bacon frying.
But 15-20 minutes to fry a rasher of bacon? And add on the oven heating up time - that's one expensive bacon butty.

Actually, I grill, (sorry, broil) my bacon. Quick, crisp as you like and healthier (less fat).
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Old 03-04-2014, 07:31 PM   #22
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They probably use one of those trendy flat weights sold for the purpose of producing flat cooked bacon.
Most restaurants use the oven method.
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Old 03-04-2014, 07:41 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
But 15-20 minutes to fry a rasher of bacon? And add on the oven heating up time - that's one expensive bacon butty.

Actually, I grill, (sorry, broil) my bacon. Quick, crisp as you like and healthier (less fat).
It can be done more quickly. RB said they use thick-cut bacon, which would take a few minutes longer. I use regular bacon and heat the oven to 400F and it takes about 12 minutes. We usually make a pound of bacon on Sunday mornings (not every week) with a more substantial breakfast than we usually have, so when the bacon's done, the oven is great for keeping other stuff warm.

And as I said, I cook it crispy, which renders most of the fat, and pour it off to keep for other uses. Not sure how broiling/grilling results in less fat.
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Old 03-04-2014, 07:51 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
But 15-20 minutes to fry a rasher of bacon? And add on the oven heating up time - that's one expensive bacon butty.

Actually, I grill, (sorry, broil) my bacon. Quick, crisp as you like and healthier (less fat).
One typically does a larger quantity. I cook two pounds of bacon at a time and freeze the extra for later use. Just a few seconds gets it back up to temp and ready to go.
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Old 03-04-2014, 08:08 PM   #25
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Not sure how broiling/grilling results in less fat.
The bacon sits on the rack on the grill pan with the heat coming from above. (Not talking BBQ grilling here) so the fat drips down and collects in the pan instead of the bacon sitting in it. Healthier, crispier and I prefer the taste.

Like this
Lakeland Large Grill Pan in griddle pan at Lakeland

Works for sausages, chops, etc., too.
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Old 03-04-2014, 08:34 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
The bacon sits on the rack on the grill pan with the heat coming from above. (Not talking BBQ grilling here) so the fat drips down and collects in the pan instead of the bacon sitting in it. Healthier, crispier and I prefer the taste.

Like this
Lakeland Large Grill Pan in griddle pan at Lakeland

Works for sausages, chops, etc., too.
I don't know if you've ever roasted bacon, but it doesn't matter whether the bacon sits in the fat while it cooks because when you pick it up and put it on paper towels/kitchen paper, most of the rendered fat stays on the pan and the rest is absorbed by the paper. So it's not dripping with fat when we eat it.

" (Not talking BBQ grilling here) "

I know, and I know how a British oven grill works, which is why I used both terms, i.e., broiling/grilling.
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Old 03-05-2014, 07:56 AM   #27
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I have always liked you Frank!
I always knew it was the bacon...
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:00 AM   #28
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+1 on the oven. A friend told me that she inverts another baking sheet on top to stop the splattering. I never tried this. Also, we should rename the post "Sienfield Bacon" in honor of the dreaded shrinkage.
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:51 AM   #29
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They probably use one of those trendy flat weights sold for the purpose of producing flat cooked bacon. The rubbery-ness perhaps comes from steam generated from the cooking bacon collecting under the weight and unable to escape.

Either that or they're serving that precooked bacon.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:30 AM   #30
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Restaurants are definitely not using that precooked bacon, unless they precook it themselves. You pay a premium for the privilege of having it already cooked. No restaurant would ever do that. They would go out of business just on bacon costs alone. It is simple for a restaurant to precook their own bacon. They use the oven method and load it up and have tons of bacon done in no time.
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