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Old 11-19-2010, 07:22 AM   #11
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I have a plan. Many of us know the humble cow, ...

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

The meat must be either cooked long, slow and moist to about 195' F., or quickly to no more than medium rare. Anything in between will give you tough meat.


Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
sorry ol' buddy, i fell asleep in the middle there. what was that again?



(lol, geez, g-dubya's gonna kill me. well, he asked for more participation.)
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Old 11-19-2010, 09:39 AM   #12
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One of the problems with identifying cuts of meat is that vendors can get creative with the names in the interest of bumping prices. Restaurants would rather create a gourmet dish from a $1.00/pound cut than a prime steak at $15 I have seen tenderloin roast and Chateaubriand laying side by side in a market. The tenderloin roast is $2.00 cheaper. Stew meat is almost always higher in price than chuck or bottom round. Generally speaking, the more specific the name, the higher the price. London Broil is a good example.
It does pay to learn to recognize the various cuts of meat.

Bolas, around here skirt steak is cut from the plate.
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Old 11-19-2010, 09:48 AM   #13
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At the market recently, I saw a cryovac seal package of marinated beef. It was labeled filet of beef. I asked the meat manager what cut it was. He answered that it was eye round. I was stunned they are selling a round cut disguised as a tenderloin.
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Old 11-19-2010, 10:05 AM   #14
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At the market recently, I saw a cryovac seal package of marinated beef. It was labeled filet of beef. I asked the meat manager what cut it was. He answered that it was eye round. I was stunned they are selling a round cut disguised as a tenderloin.
I see this type of labeling often, and is the reason I think that recognizing cuts of meat is one of the more important cooking skills.
This thread is to me a good idea.
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Old 11-19-2010, 10:09 AM   #15
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The problem is there are WAY to many different names for the SAME cut of meat form region to region.

One example: My favorite cut of steak is a NY Strip but and even in the same market that cut can be found under different labels: strip and shell.

I have also seen T-Bone and Porterhouse interchangeable.
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Old 11-19-2010, 10:26 AM   #16
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I either buy beef for braising or a Rib-eye and the odd T-bone (<once a year) so I'm sorry, I don't pay much attention to the other cuts. I'm really good at Etouffe', soups and stews, I tend to buy whatever is on sale.

Thanks for the education!
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Old 11-19-2010, 10:44 AM   #17
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Moving back on the animal, the next two primals are the rib (upper) and plate. Once again, there is a big difference in the two ends of the rib. As I said, the first cut rib steak and the last cut chuck are a knife cut apart. The rib is cut into prime rib or rib steaks. Market names vary, but almost all have rib in the name. Prime rib is no longer a grade, but instead a cut. I have seen select grade prime rib. The cut nearest the chuck has much more fat than the back portion.
The lower cut off portions are short ribs, good for braising. If the rib is boned, you also get the equivalent of pork spare ribs. Good for low and slow cooking much like pork ribs.

With rib steaks, you want a good amount of marbeling, a fat cover of a half to an inch. Overly lean rib portions will be dry, tough, and lacking in taste.
The plate is a hard fatty portion of the animal. Deli style corned beef and pastrami often come from here. It is also the home of the skirt steak, a relatively tough lean cut, As GW said, low and slow or quick and hot are the preferred preparations. Thin cross grain slicing is a must. When I worked in the packing house, the plate fat was desirable added to too lean ground beef. I assume that is still the case.
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Old 11-20-2010, 12:02 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Moving back on the animal, the next two primals are the rib (upper) and plate. Once again, there is a big difference in the two ends of the rib. As I said, the first cut rib steak and the last cut chuck are a knife cut apart. The rib is cut into prime rib or rib steaks. Market names vary, but almost all have rib in the name. Prime rib is no longer a grade, but instead a cut. I have seen select grade prime rib. The cut nearest the chuck has much more fat than the back portion.
The lower cut off portions are short ribs, good for braising. If the rib is boned, you also get the equivalent of pork spare ribs. Good for low and slow cooking much like pork ribs.

With rib steaks, you want a good amount of marbeling, a fat cover of a half to an inch. Overly lean rib portions will be dry, tough, and lacking in taste.
The plate is a hard fatty portion of the animal. Deli style corned beef and pastrami often come from here. It is also the home of the skirt steak, a relatively tough lean cut, As GW said, low and slow or quick and hot are the preferred preparations. Thin cross grain slicing is a must. When I worked in the packing house, the plate fat was desirable added to too lean ground beef. I assume that is still the case.
Niiiice. Great info. As you stated, Prime Rib isn't prime rib any more. Poor labeling is responsible for that. That rib roast is a standing rib roast. It is supposed to be prime rib when the beef grade is USDA Prime. I saw a package with the bold letters - Prime Rib - blazing from the label. If you read a bit further down, the USDA rating was choice. The name - Prime Rib - was the brand name of the product, not the quality of the cut.

Unknown to many a cut from the chuck, sometimes called petite steak, sometimes called sizzle steak, and a few other names, is the second most tender cut from the carcass. It is recognizable as an oval chunk of meat, well marbled with speckles of fat, and a piece of gristle running down the center. It has more flavor than the rib steaks, and is more tender than the rest of the meat on the carcass. Also, it's inexpensive compared to the more recognized steaks such as rib steak, rib-eye, t-bone, etc.

The famous Delmonico steak comes from the rib portion, about the 3rd rib steak back from the chuck, if I remember correctly.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 11-20-2010, 02:13 AM   #19
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Thanks Big Jimmy, this might be heresy to a nation of chili experts, one of the things I make with skirt is C/con carne, I dont mince the skirt I chop it into little cubes, I also use it to make beef olives.
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Old 11-20-2010, 02:46 AM   #20
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Niiiice. Great info. As you stated, Prime Rib isn't prime rib any more. Poor labeling is responsible for that. That rib roast is a standing rib roast. It is supposed to be prime rib when the beef grade is USDA Prime. I saw a package with the bold letters - Prime Rib - blazing from the label. If you read a bit further down, the USDA rating was choice. The name - Prime Rib - was the brand name of the product, not the quality of the cut.

Unknown to many a cut from the chuck, sometimes called petite steak, sometimes called sizzle steak, and a few other names, is the second most tender cut from the carcass. It is recognizable as an oval chunk of meat, well marbled with speckles of fat, and a piece of gristle running down the center. It has more flavor than the rib steaks, and is more tender than the rest of the meat on the carcass. Also, it's inexpensive compared to the more recognized steaks such as rib steak, rib-eye, t-bone, etc.

The famous Delmonico steak comes from the rib portion, about the 3rd rib steak back from the chuck, if I remember correctly.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
When I worked the packing house, the chuck tender, as we called it, was reserved for employees, and we bought it for chuck prices. You could get one or two 2 inch steaks from it. Wrapped in bacon, some would say that the filet was the second best steak on the animal.
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