"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-11-2005, 06:12 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
Yes, I've visited Bangkok and Phuket in Thailand on my way to visit family in Australia. It is a beautiful country and the devastation wrought by the tsunami is just awful.

Thanks for your interest, but I think we'd better let Lifter's thread revert to his theme of HAGGIS!!! 8)
__________________

__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2005, 11:23 PM   #12
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Hi Ishbel!

Thanks for your insights and contribution on this topic!

A question or two for you...your posting referred to beef bung and to sheep intestine, both of which would give a "sausage-like" output (thinking "visually") which is a fair bit distanced from watching our older Scottish "pipers" "addressing the Haggis" and slicing through the sheep's stomach with the "Skein Dhu" (sp?)...

I got "my" recipe from our Regimental Pipe Major, who has been running this up for our Lodge for, well, a "LONG" time...about 20 years ago, he "permitted" me to "assist"...and I note that it is greatly changed from the lamb's liver, lamb kidney (NEVER LUNGS!)(?), heart and ground up bits of meat...the "binding agent" was always beef suet, as lamb tends to be pretty lean, and mutton is harder to find...

Most of us found that this tasted pretty "strong", and found the "smell" of the cooking innard casings was unappealing at the least!

So a lot of the "current" recipe is "compromise", that caters to the NA "taste", where we don't get a big diet of sheep...

With my upbringing, I sure don't mind any cut of lamb, but agree that "mutton" requires some skill in cooking, if not a pot of mustard on the side!

Are there any other "traditional methods" on record "over there"?

Stands to reason that there'd be "Rich Man/Poor Man" versions, and, since I love the "history of cooking", I'd deeply appreciate your comments!

Best Thanks and Regards!

Lifter
__________________

__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 03:46 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
Lifter
The 'livers and lights' part of the recipe is an intrinsic part of the dish. Haggis without the lungs would be a modern take on it, I suppose! Also, don't forget the the use of lungs is what makes it illegal to import it to USA! Certainly, my butcher still uses the traditional style of recipe. Unfortunately, each traditional haggis maker jealously guards his recipe - often handed down from generations ago.....

There is a best haggis maker competition in Scotland every year - I've eaten the produce from a couple of them, and there are considerable differences in taste and texture between producers... but I think that, generally, it is the closely guarded 'spices' that the various makers use which gives the distinct differences. As I've already said, I prefer MacSween's haggis, if buying a mass-produced product, however there are lots and lots of producers in Scotland. One of the most innovative must be McKeans - I believe they do a venison version! Here's their website http://www.scottishhaggis.co.uk/Default.htm

The recipe I posted was not my butcher's own - but from a Scots-based website (many of the 'Scots' sites on the web are actually American-based!) I have to confess that I thought all 'traditional' haggis still used the sheeps stomach - and, so far as I know, my supplier still does. I've never seen a sausage shaped haggis anywhere, though - so I presume that the bung would be flexible and pliant enough to turn out the usual ovoid, collapsed rugby ball shape, but I don't know that for certain!

Maybe it's just familiarity, but I don't think haggis has an unpleasant smell when cooking - quite appetising, really :D

I'm going to 2 Burns' Suppers this year - and at one of them, women are allowed to participate in the Selkirk Blessing and the Address to the Haggis.... Yes, we are making great strides in equality..... :D

PS : Skean Dubh!
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 07:07 AM   #14
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Beauty, Ishbel!

Hope you don't mind that I share this around a bit!

Seldom one can get such great input back on a subject like this!

And again, as always, my THANKS for your posting and participation!

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 07:21 AM   #15
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
I'm sure if you did a google search for Haggis with the added words Scotland and traditional - you'd probably find a recipe which claims to be THE definitive one....

Glad you found the information interesting.

Slainte
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 08:12 AM   #16
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
The very reason one doesn't "google" for a "definitive Texas Chili" recipe, or how to make perogies, or what killed Princess Diana...you'll always get a "definitive answer" that is absolutely unbelievable...

Okay, must head for "work"...

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 11:04 AM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
Yes, but a judicious search might come up with one text which supports another.... and one of the may even BE a definitive version? 8)
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 01:36 AM   #18
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
In my "on coming" "retirement", Ishbel, I really do "hope" to find time for such things,,,

In the "meantime", I will catch on to some addresses such as yours, and places to visit, such as come from my forbears, and get the "full experience"...

In Canada, the "appetite" for haggis is pretty much restricted to "Burns Night", and the content may get "traditional"...as opposed to popular taste...

Am conversing with "Brooksy" with how it comes across over in "Oz"...

And laughing about the thorough "beating up" "Leigh" is giving me on her taste of the USA's "Pork"...

Am starting to wonder if my "trout" tastes "watery", or my Salmon, Sole, Tuna, etc, tastes ""salty", because of the "environment" the poor dears are "forced" to live through with their aqueous "leaky" patches of skin!

Oh well...

Did about $100K worth of "business" in the absence of two days, enough to keep at least a couple of "us" employed in the next twelve months...even if "eating" pork or thosevery wierdlyfed chickens, fish or, GOD FORBID, Cdn beef....

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 03:47 AM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
Well, we eat haggis about once a fortnight during the winter - but probably don't eat it at all from May to October! Again, it has to be good haggis - preferably made by my local butcher - whose recipe suits my palate best.

Scottish cuisine uses some of the best ingredients in the world - our salmon and beef and lamb are unbeatable (yes, OK, I know Canada has great fish!) - it's just a pity that our stocks of sea fish are so low, with many of our huge fleets, such as Aberdeen and Peterhead now reduced to a shadow of their former glory. Haddock, Scotland's favourite fish for fish suppers in chip shops is in very, very short supply - and the quotas mean that a lot of our cod and haddock are landed by Faeroe Island boats.

Our soft fruits are glorious - tayberries, loganberries etc - as well as the better known raspberries from round the Aberdeen and Ayrshire areas are sublime. Cranachan with fresh 'rasps' as we call them is a sublime taste experience.

Our baking is famous - bridies, mutton pies, scones, clootie dumplings, selkirk bannocks, Aberdeen rowies.... the list is endless....

I have attended a lot of cookery courses, both in the UK and in mainland Europe - but I am really keen on spreading the gospel of guid Scots fare....

And yet..... yes..... we are the nation who 'invented' the deep fried Mars Bar (no, I've never tasted it, but I've made it for overseas visitors who've requested a sample!) and the deep fried pizza. Which is probably why we are the Heart Attack Capital of Europe. 8)
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 04:24 AM   #20
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
At Some point in life, when you want it to be "REALLY" laid back...come to Canada/Ontario, and visit Manitoulin Island ("biggest island in a 'lake', 'with lakes', in the world") and possibly the most "laid back" and "relaxed" place I've ever been to...they "eat" hawberries and such stuff there...famous for it...but I'm sure you would fall in love with the place, Ishbel!
__________________

__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Haggis stuffed mushrooms - ideal for Hogmanay buffet Ishbel Appetizers & Hors D'oeuvres 3 12-24-2004 07:45 AM
Help me troubleshoot this recipe GB General Cooking 22 11-05-2004 11:08 AM
Help needed with a Yellow Cake recipe! Chopstix Cakes & Cupcakes 6 11-05-2004 08:34 AM
Silly question about substitutions for cheesecake recipe runninduo Cakes & Cupcakes 23 10-08-2004 12:41 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.