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Old 01-10-2005, 10:16 PM   #1
 
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Haggis Recipe

Will go with this venue for this recipe variant, as its mainly meat...

To make a "bath" of 12 lbs of Haggis, start with a beef heart, 3-4 lbs liver, and suet, to round this up to about 7 lbs...

A 3lb bag of groats (we use Robin Hood/Intl Multifoods product, buy it there, too)

2 lbs yellow onions
7 teaspoons salt
4 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons cayenne

Grind the meat and groats together until you have formed a mass resembling "raw hamburger"...carefully mix seasoning and minced oniion through the mass, until thoroughly mixed...

Pack the mix into plastic "turkey cooking bags" (ie oven safe, food grade plastic) (I know, I know, its supposed to be sheep's stomochs, but this smells to high heaven as it cooks!)

Place a rack on the bottom of a roasting pan (so the bags don't touch the bottom), place the bags and fill with water, and insert in oven on low, slow, heat...

Cook about 7 hours, periodically checking water level, and replentishing as necessary...(about 2-3 times)...

Then open bags, add 1-2 cups of milk (this reduces the "dark meat" appearance) and simmer for a couple more hours.

You'll note that this recipe is based on using beef, as opposed lamb, or mutton, which is simply to cater more to the "taste" of North Americans, who are less used to those woolly critters...(although I personally have a taste for lamb's liver!)

I would be very interested to hear any other variations that might be known to List Members, hopefully in time for the annual "Burns Night" dinners!

Lifter

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Old 01-10-2005, 10:19 PM   #2
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What are groats? :?
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Old 01-10-2005, 10:26 PM   #3
 
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Pin head oats, rolled flat, in this case
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Old 01-10-2005, 10:29 PM   #4
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Thanks! I have never had Haggis or even seen a recipe for it but it looks interesting & I'd be willing to try it sometime.
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Old 01-11-2005, 03:52 AM   #5
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Here's a traditional Scottish-based recipe for haggis. Personally, I buy mine from my local butcher - but MacSween's of Edinburgh make the best commercially produced and widely available haggis (they even make vegetarian versions - the mind boggles!)

BTW - a 'beef bung' is beef intestines - now more commonly used than the sheep's stomach of former years

I love haggis - we probably eat it about once a fortnight during the cold, wet winter months... but never in the summer - just too 'filling' for warmer climes.

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This from www.rampantscotland.com

Ingredients:
Set of sheep's heart, lungs and liver (cleaned by a butcher)
One beef bung
3 cups finely chopped suet
One cup medium ground oatmeal
Two medium onions, finely chopped
One cup beef stock
One teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
One teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon mace
Method:
Trim off any excess fat and sinew from the sheep's intestine and, if present, discard the windpipe. Place in a large pan, cover with water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for an hour or possibly longer to ensure that they are all tender. Drain and cool.

Some chefs toast the oatmeal in an oven until it is thoroughly dried out (but not browned or burnt!)

Finely chop the meat and combine in a large bowl with the suet, oatmeal, finely chopped onions, beef stock, salt, pepper, nutmeg and mace. Make sure the ingredients are mixed well. Stuff the meat and spices mixture into the beef bung which should be over half full. Then press out the air and tie the open ends tightly with string. Make sure that you leave room for the mixture to expand or else it may burst while cooking. If it looks as though it may do that, prick with a sharp needle to reduce the pressure.

Place in a pot and cover with water. Bring to the boil and immediately reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for three hours. Avoid boiling vigorously to avoid bursting the skin.

Serve hot with "champit tatties and bashit neeps" (mashed/creamed potato and turnip/swede). For added flavour, you can add some nutmeg to the potatoes and allspice to the turnip/swede. Some people like to pour a little whisky over their haggis - Drambuie is even better! Don't go overboard on this or you'll make the hggis cold. At Burns Suppers, the haggis is traditionally piped in and Burns' "Address to the Haggis" recited over it.
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Old 01-11-2005, 11:00 AM   #6
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Ishbel, you sure have different variety of meats to choose from. You do eat sheep? That is one thing I don't think I can ever find. What does it taste like? Have tasted lamb but not sheep. Only thing they offer here is chicken, beef and pork. This is really limited. I have eaten goat before but my uncle from Russia fixed it. That was really unusual. Did you ever eat goat? Sorry, if I sound ignorant just interests me.
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Old 01-11-2005, 11:15 AM   #7
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Lamb is young sheep! Mutton (older sheep) is a much fattier meat, and is less available nowadays as it could be tough to eat and often needed long, slow cooking to make it tender.

I eat a lot of lamb. After all, the Highland Clearances took place in order to allow the Clan Chiefs to use the land more profitably - ie get rid of the people to run sheep on the same area... Hence the huge influx of Scots to Canada (Nova Scotia etc) and a smaller number to the USA!

I have eaten goat - curried and roasted - but I'm not too keen, although I like goat's cheeses.
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Old 01-11-2005, 11:55 AM   #8
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I love lamb that is why I was curious about sheep. You had recipe for sheep's heart and that is what caught my attention. You really are giving me education. Have you ever lived USA? You seem to have been every place else. Your father had to travel a lot. Is Ishbel your given name? Hope you don't think of me as personal. Just interesting. Thanks
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Old 01-11-2005, 05:20 PM   #9
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No I don't mind the questions! And no, I've never lived in the US, but I've visited quite a few times on business and have holidayed there a couple of times when I was younger. 8) And, yes, Ishbel is my given name - the Scots Gaelic form of Isobel. No, I don't consider I've travelled and seen everywhere in the world, not by a long chalk I haven't visited Canada or New Zealand, or a number of the East European countries like Bulgaria or Romania.. Limited travel in the Far East and in the Middle East - living in one country there doesn't mean you know the whole Gulf area!
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Old 01-11-2005, 06:06 PM   #10
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Ishbel thank you for sharing. Have you ever visited or heard about Thailand? Reason my one son has friend there and wants to visit. Family thinks there are other more interesting places. That is where all the excitment is with the Tsunami or whatever you way they spell it. Looks like a resort area. This friend said he is not around that location thankfully. I haven't travelled that much and just knowing someone has been around more than I have is admired. Thanks.
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