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Old 02-25-2005, 06:36 PM   #21
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fear & loathing of the american cook

Fear & loathing of the american cook.Just a sampling:beef tongue,boudin noire(black pudding),boudin blanc( chitling sausages),tripes a la mode de caen(menudo),deviled kidneys,lamb brains in black butter,frog legs,duck feet(as in dim sum),jellied calf feet,squids cooked in their ink,snails,grilled snake(exept texas),eel pie,horse steaks,braised endives,mountain oysters,SPINACH.....Foods that will make them wake up screaming in the middle of the night .Just rattling your chain guys.
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Old 02-25-2005, 10:30 PM   #22
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i've had most of those ifit, and i must say that they were all good in their own odd way.

oh, you forgot scrapple.
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Old 02-26-2005, 08:16 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
Hi Ishbel, as far as I can figure, I have to agree that brawn is the same thing we call head cheese if you live in the North, and souse if you don't.

One half of us loves the stuff.

But regarding haggis, Robert Burns was right. Unfortunately we can only get the tinned, which I cannot find, or the frozen stuff in the states. And the frozen stuff, or any human food in this country, cannot contain lung, and so they add far too much liver to compensate.

Not very tasty.

Have been to Scotland a number of times, and part of the reason we go, in addition to meeting the fine people, is the haggis.

Went with my FIL, and with a wee dram he tried the stuff in a pub and then asked to return for more the next day.

Those who make fun of haggis have never tried it.
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My friends in the US tell me the tinned stuff they've tried is pretty ropey! I tried it ONCE whilst in the US at Burns' Night.. NEVER AGAIN.

Glad to hear you like it. It is an acquired taste, but it really doesn't merit all the 'YUK, BLECH' type comments - especially as most of those come from folk that haven't even TRIED the stuff!
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Old 02-26-2005, 04:30 PM   #24
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I like scrapples too(store bought & tweaked)Buckytom,nothing like it for a freezing morning breakfast.Ishbel could you provide US with a recipe for haggies(there is a slaughter house nearby where I could bribe my way to a fresh lamb stomach,etc.. & produce a reasonable substitute thereof).Most of those dishes are acquired tastes,probably from times of famine,when every bit of the animal counted,but still the taste linger.I still do miss the local charcuterie(a dlicatessen +++) where all those abominations could be found either fully or partially cooked.H*e*l*l, I live in extreme south west colorado where (excepted for the navajo) lamb is looked upon with deep misgivings by the locals,althought they raise sheep as a cash crop???Could there be such a thing as prejudiced tastebuds?
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Old 02-26-2005, 06:32 PM   #25
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I do not make my own haggis - the smell when cooking it from the raw state can be off-putting. I buy directly from my local butcher (who makes his own) or a MacSween's haggis - which is the best commercially-available haggis in Scotland (IMHO).

Here's a recipe for haggis which I posted here a while back. It's taken from www.rampantscotland.com

This from www.rampantscotland.com

Ingredients:
Set of sheep's heart, lungs and liver (cleaned by a butcher)
One beef bung
3 cups finely chopped suet
One cup medium ground oatmeal
Two medium onions, finely chopped
One cup beef stock
One teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
One teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon mace
Method:
Trim off any excess fat and sinew from the sheep's intestine and, if present, discard the windpipe. Place in a large pan, cover with water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for an hour or possibly longer to ensure that they are all tender. Drain and cool.

Some chefs toast the oatmeal in an oven until it is thoroughly dried out (but not browned or burnt!)

Finely chop the meat and combine in a large bowl with the suet, oatmeal, finely chopped onions, beef stock, salt, pepper, nutmeg and mace. Make sure the ingredients are mixed well. Stuff the meat and spices mixture into the beef bung which should be over half full. Then press out the air and tie the open ends tightly with string. Make sure that you leave room for the mixture to expand or else it may burst while cooking. If it looks as though it may do that, prick with a sharp needle to reduce the pressure.

Place in a pot and cover with water. Bring to the boil and immediately reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for three hours. Avoid boiling vigorously to avoid bursting the skin.

Serve hot with "champit tatties and bashit neeps" (mashed/creamed potato and turnip/swede). For added flavour, you can add some nutmeg to the potatoes and allspice to the turnip/swede. Some people like to pour a little whisky over their haggis - Drambuie is even better! Don't go overboard on this or you'll make the haggis cold. At Burns Suppers, the haggis is traditionally piped in and Burns' "Address to the Haggis" recited over it.
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Old 02-26-2005, 09:52 PM   #26
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All this talk and today someone told me I was crazy to eat blood sausage. What is wrong with that? She said I wouldn't eat it if I saw them fix it. Is it really revolting? Used to eat with scrambled eggs. Eggs are not exactly appetizing if you think about where they come from.
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Old 02-27-2005, 11:31 AM   #27
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Thank you Ishbel for the recipe & link.Clarifications: bung=intestine,beef or mutton suet?Lion rampant forever!In the kitchen:I ,personally,don't want to know what goes on in a restaurant's kitchen THAT would put me off my feed.
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Old 02-27-2005, 01:02 PM   #28
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A bung is like a chub or piece of sausage. Sorry, don't know how to better explain it than that.
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Old 02-27-2005, 05:33 PM   #29
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Here's a bit about MacSween's recipe - it explains the 'bung' in the previous recipe
http://www.foodloversbritain.com/org...tion-1166.html
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Old 02-28-2005, 08:37 PM   #30
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Thank You Ishbel,Iwill have to make a couple of substitutions(bung>lamb casing,oatmeal>store bought breakfast oatmeal).I'll keep you posted about the results.It might be a month or so to get the fresh lamb(spring comes late in the mountains of colorado).Regards.
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