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Old 08-20-2008, 10:27 AM   #11
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haha...thanks for all your comments guys!

I will probably get the dry aged then. I'm not having a big dinner like this in a looooong time. hee hee...

So for those who have tried the dry aged beef, here are a few more questions:
Is the cooking process of dry aged beef exactly the same as the regular ones we buy? I did watch a youtube video (look up AGED BEEF RIB ROAST..sorry can't post URLs yet)to get information on dry aged beef and he trimmed off the sides. I am getting mine dry aged directly from a professional butcher. Do I have to trim off the sides? Can you please share what you use to marinade the beef?
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Old 08-20-2008, 10:30 AM   #12
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The cooking process will be the same. I would not marinate it in anything. Just salt and pepper. You want the flavor of the beef that you are paying so much for to shine through.
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Old 08-20-2008, 10:35 AM   #13
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I don't have the fancy china, silver, and crystal linen...Luckily I just got back from Napa Valley and have cases of quality wine...:)

My guests definitely have discriminating tastes. That's why there's a lot of pressure on me...I hope it turns out nothing less than excellent


Quote:
Originally Posted by simplicity View Post
Tattrat is right.

We cannot make this decision for you. I have made my share of rib roasts, mostly for family on special occasions. I use prime.

If I took the extra step to use dry-aged, then it would be an epicurean evening. I would exchange my $15.00 bottles of wine for $40.00 bottle ones. I would drag out the china, silver, crystal and linen. The evening would be dedicated to eating well, and I would probably only invite those who appreciated the difference.
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Old 08-20-2008, 10:36 AM   #14
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Dry aged all the way.

Make a paste of salt, pepper, dried thyme and rosemary, garlic and olive oil. Spread liberally. Cook fat side up, bone side down.
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Old 08-20-2008, 11:26 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
The cooking process will be the same. I would not marinate it in anything. Just salt and pepper. You want the flavor of the beef that you are paying so much for to shine through.

This needs repeating!!

(Boldness emphasis is mine)
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Old 08-20-2008, 04:52 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyNYC View Post
I don't have the fancy china, silver, and crystal linen...Luckily I just got back from Napa Valley and have cases of quality wine...:)

My guests definitely have discriminating tastes. That's why there's a lot of pressure on me...I hope it turns out nothing less than excellent
Okay, I'm spoiled because I do have those things. Presentation, to me, is like the icing on a cake. In NYC I'd go to a flower stall and find enough to fill an interesting bowl, and/or buy a few inexpensive candles. These small things.

You are going to prepare a special dinner. With a few extra bucks you can make it an unforgettable one.

Enjoy!
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Old 08-20-2008, 07:20 PM   #17
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You have excellent wine and meat...your guests won't miss the china.

You can still set a good looking table.

Find some inexpensive yard goods that go with your decor and several rolls of fusing tape. Experiment with the fabric, and once you decide how you want to lay it, cut it to fit and iron up the raw edges.

Mismatched plates are fine, as long as they're not plastic. So are cheap restaurant style plates from the discount store. You can also find some pretty decent looking wine glasses there.

For napkins, check out the terry dish towels...they work great. Inexpensive napkin rings dress them up. I have wooden ones.

Flowers are always special. If you put them on the table, cut the stems short and cluster in a low container.
Candles are nice too, but make sure your guests have enough light so they can see to eat.

You will need a small, special hors douevres, something green, such as a salad or roasted asparagus, and a starch...potatoes or rice.

You will also need to offer a small sweet after dinner...perhaps a dip of good French vanilla ice cream with a shot of amaretto or creme de menthe over the top.
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Old 08-20-2008, 09:05 PM   #18
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Make sure not to bring the internal temperature of the beef above 135, max.

This recipe, from one of my cookbooks, works well for me. It produces great results.

"Standing Rib Roast
This undisputed king of beef roasts is often mistakenly called a Prime Rib Roast. But you really can't call it that unless you have purchased a USDA Prime Standing Rib roast. If you buy USDA Choice, then you just call it a standing rib roast, same cut, different quality. There are a number of ways to cook this hunk of meat. But all of them use slow, low heat to preserve and enhance the delicate flavor.
You can get very involved with this roast. A classic way to prepare a standing rib roast is to completely pack the meat in very coarse salt. This forms a crust which seals the meat. I haven't tried this technique, but it sounds like it would work well.
We are going to keep things simple, allowing you to experience a no hassle approach with delicious results. You will need an oven-safe meat thermometer for this one. Though a barbecue works, we will use the oven.

Ingredients:
1 standing rib roast, any size and with chine bones intact
Salt
Pepper
Preheat the oven to 450'- F. Place the roast on a suitable work surface(cutting board). Rub the entire roast with cooking oil. Sprinkle salt and pepper liberally over the meat surface.
Place on a rack inside a shallow roasting pan, bone-side down.
Place the thermometer into the thickest portion of the
roast, taking care to avoid touching the bone. Place the roast
into the oven and cook for fifteen minutes. Reduce the oven
temperature to 250 degrees F. and allow to cook until the meat
thermometer reads 127 degrees. Remove from the oven and let
rest for 20 minutes. Remove the bones from the meat and
carve 1/4" thick slices against the meat grain. Serve with
horseradish and meat sauce condiments, and your favorite
veggies (sweet potatoes go well with rib roasts)."

Copied from "You Can Be a Great Cook with Beef" and distributed with permission of the author (me).

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North


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Old 08-21-2008, 12:00 AM   #19
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Thank you all for your recommendations. I am new to this site and I am loving the expert advice.
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Old 01-06-2009, 01:21 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyNYC View Post
I don't have the fancy china, silver, and crystal linen...Luckily I just got back from Napa Valley and have cases of quality wine...:)

My guests definitely have discriminating tastes. That's why there's a lot of pressure on me...I hope it turns out nothing less than excellent
Forget the fancy china, most people could care less about what they're eating on. They care about what they're eating.

I have a friend (have I told this story before?) who didn't have matching china because she couldn't afford to buy good quality tableware. She decided to get one complete place setting from garage sales, store sales, discontinued patterns etc. Each person at the table had a different pattern, but the setting was complete, soup bowl, salad plate, dinner plate, cup, saucer etc. and I can't tell you how impressed we were. We had fun looking at each others' patterns and loved the idea. She still does it and we can't wait to eat at her house because every once in a while she comes up with a couple of new place settings. Very clever. Very cheap and very impressive.
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