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Old 01-06-2009, 05:57 PM   #21
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My Mom used to make her's in loaf pan, but I follow the form it in a pan and turn the loaf out onto a baking sheet pan.

I use a grater and grate the onion into mine you get the no chunks that way.

The torn bread with milk will work, it does add some moisture, just be sure to use a white bread.
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Old 01-06-2009, 05:58 PM   #22
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Re: pans or free-form, it depends on what kind of meatloaf I'm making. If I'm just using one package of ground turkey (between 1 & 1-1/3 pounds) I'll normally use a regular loaf pan (no insert or anything). Sometimes I'll even use a glass pie dish for a plain small meatloaf & cut it into "pie wedges" to serve. I'll also normally use a regular loaf pan if I'm making a layered or stuffed meatloaf, since the pan helps to keep the filling from leaking out. But if I'm making a meatloaf recipe that calls for around 3# of ground meat or so, then I definitely do it free-form in a large baking dish.

As far as the vegetables - I ALWAYS saute them first. Have never just added chopped veggies raw to a meatloaf mix.
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Old 01-06-2009, 06:29 PM   #23
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I agree, it's not the pan.

James Beard tells us that Meatloaf is the Americanized version of a terrine. Myself, after I learned that the way I made them changed and the flavor went way, way up: a terrine is supposed to have fat, so the pan isn't the issue.

The thing about fat and the American Meatloaf is that it has no real flavor (especially when you use meat bought at a supermarket, that is, factory beef). I add pork meat and pork fat and lean beef to make meatloaf now, I grind it up in my food processor and it gives me fantastic results. If you can't eat pork, then try veal.
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Old 01-06-2009, 08:32 PM   #24
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I agree, it's not the pan.

James Beard tells us that Meatloaf is the Americanized version of a terrine.
My God, you set my brain afire by dangling that word TERRINE before my eyes. Having never heard of it, I checked it out and found a whole new concept of cookery I never dreamed existed. I became convinced, as I flitted from page to page, that in a former life, I had been French chef fighting to emerge from my current blue-collar eating style. When I described the kind of meatloaf I hoped I could learn to cook, I was unconsciously describing some of the more noble characteristics of a meat terrine. However, the onerous problem in this style of cooking is the unappetizing price of the receptacle in which the extraordinary ingredients (trust me, the word extraordinary is not too extreme) are placed. I did, however, find one bargain for only $98.63 online. The terrine itself is exotic, and elegant, and looks like Louis XIV designed it himself.

I urge all those within reach of these words to Google the word "terrine" and be prepared for a whole new concept of what constitutes food and how to make it edible. Frankly, I almost threw up a time or two, but then I am excessively squeamish.

The bottom line is, I had more fun reading about terrine the pan and terrine the style of cooking, than I did reading Margaret Mitchell's "Gone With the Wind."
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Old 01-06-2009, 09:49 PM   #25
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Well, enough of all this foreplay, it's time for action. I'm going with Andy M's modifications of my previously unspectacular recipe. I'm incorporating his genius as follows:

1-1/2 lbs. chuck
3/4 cup plain bread crumbs
1 onion, chopped
1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped
1 cup of mushrooms
1 T. soy sauce
1/2 t. thyme
1/2 to 1/3 grated cheese
1/2 cup ketchup
S & P to taste

I intend to saute my veggies first, I'm dumping my pan in favor of a freeform meatloaf, and I'm expecting a soul satisfying climax after courting this recipe for so long. I intend to seduce it Thursday when I get back home after eating my usual third rate victuals on the road. Friday, when I make a sandwich with my leftover meatloaf, I'll know if I have a winner. If so, I may write a book about how to make meatloaf (of course, I'll cite sources).

P.S. To immortalize the delightful observations of Qsis (Lee) above, I will add an egg to my recipe in her honor.
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Old 01-06-2009, 09:57 PM   #26
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It's true, terrines are AMAZING but they don't have to be expensive to make. If you have Julia Child's 'The Way To Cook' or her "Mastering The Art of French Cooking', you'll find a lot of helpful advise and recipes that won't break the bank.
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Old 01-06-2009, 10:20 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mignon View Post
Well, enough of all this foreplay, it's time for action. I'm going with Andy M's modifications of my previously unspectacular recipe. I'm incorporating his genius as follows:

1-1/2 lbs. chuck
3/4 cup plain bread crumbs
1 onion, chopped
1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped
1 cup of mushrooms
1 T. soy sauce
1/2 t. thyme
1/2 to 1/3 grated cheese
1/2 cup ketchup
S & P to taste

I intend to saute my veggies first, I'm dumping my pan in favor of a freeform meatloaf, and I'm expecting a soul satisfying climax after courting this recipe for so long. I intend to seduce it Thursday when I get back home after eating my usual third rate victuals on the road. Friday, when I make a sandwich with my leftover meatloaf, I'll know if I have a winner. If so, I may write a book about how to make meatloaf (of course, I'll cite sources).

P.S. To immortalize the delightful observations of Qsis (Lee) above, I will add an egg to my recipe in her honor.

I never promised a soul satisfying climax from meatloaf. If that happens, I may try this combination myself.

mignon, you had an egg listed in your original recipe...
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Old 01-06-2009, 10:24 PM   #28
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I never promised a soul satisfying climax from meatloaf. If that happens, I may try this combination myself.
You're in fine form tonight, Andy!
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Old 01-07-2009, 06:45 AM   #29
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Mignon, even though Andy is a bubble-buster, you still get points for the egg thing!

God speed!

Lee
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:58 AM   #30
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Yes - please don't leave out the egg!! Otherwise, you most likely will end up with burger crumbles once you go to slice the loaf - the egg is the binder.
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