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Old 08-29-2007, 12:06 PM   #1
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Pan broiling ground beef/bison; it never fully cooks!

I've been trying my best to cook beef/bison on my skillet over a stove-top, but the meat never seems to entirely cook. I'm afraid that if I don't learn how to cook these meats properly, I'll end up with e-coli one of these days. Here's what I'm doing:

1) Put 1 lb of ground beef/bison on skillet
2) Turn stovetop to medium heat
3) Try my best to make the meat as cooked as possible

I always end up with pink spots in the middle of the meat. Is there anything I can do to cook these meats better? (also, I just bought ground turkey and plan on using the same cooking method)

I'm new to cooking, so don't judge ... lol.

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Old 08-29-2007, 12:22 PM   #2
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That's not "pan broiling." That's pan frying or sauteeing.

But really the only thing you have to do is cook it for a longer amount of time.

I suggest you turn the heat on to medium or medium high, sprinkle some salt in the skillet, dump the meat in, and cook it, breaking it up with a wooden spoon as it cooks.
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Old 08-29-2007, 12:40 PM   #3
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Are you trying to make patties or just crumbled ground meat? If it’s crumbled ground meat, just stick with medium high heat, and stir it often as if you’re stir frying. Keep an eye on the biggest piece as your doing this, and when you think it’s done, break the biggest piece open with your spatula and check for pink. If there is no pink, drain it, otherwise, keep cooking.

For patties, you’ll want to drop your heat down to medium, and you’ll want to cover the pan to retain heat and allow the patty to cook on all side instead of just where it is in contact with the pan. Keep your patties to about 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick. Don’t make 2 inch tall mini-meatloafs! Let the burgers go 5-8 minutes on one side, then flip. Go another 5-8 minutes on the other side and flip again. You should get an instant read meat thermometer to check the internal temp.....but once you get some practice, you’ll be able to judge doneness by pressing on the patty to determine its texture and how much it “gives”. But never mash down hard on the patties as this squeezes the juices out and leads to a dry patty.

Bison is really lean meat, and can burn before it gets done. So you may want to make your Bison patties a little thinner, lower your temp a little after your first flip, and add a little bit of oil to the pan. You could also add some fatty pork sausage to the pix, but that would change the flavor of a true bison burger.
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Old 08-29-2007, 04:35 PM   #4
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If you cook bison clear through, you will render it inedible. It takes on the texture of shoe leather.

We always broiled hamburgers in the oven. My mom made my dad's very thin so it would cook through in the time ours became medium rare.

These days, I rarely make burgers at home, but I would never cook them past medium rare, so pan frying them is a no-brainer. I think you are over-reacting to the e-coli "thing." Wash your hands and handle all meat carefully. Unless, of course, you prefer your meat well done.
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Old 08-29-2007, 04:45 PM   #5
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i've heard that bison/buffalo meat will stay a little pinker longer, even though the internal temperature has risen to a safe point.

when making buffalo burgers for people who prefer more well done, i have noticed that it took me much longer to "cook the pink out". actually, the hockey pucks that i made still didn't look well done all the way through.

if you're making burgers, try making them skinnier, especially thinner in the middle.
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Old 08-29-2007, 04:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdthescroll View Post
I always end up with pink spots in the middle of the meat.
It sounds to me, and I could be wrong, that you are not breaking up the meat once you out it in the pan. How exactly are you doing it? Are you just dumping a chuck of ground meat into a hot pan and letting it cook or are you using a spoon or spatula to break the meat up and move it around?
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Old 08-29-2007, 07:17 PM   #7
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slightly off topic

I haven't been breaking the meat up; I'll try breaking it into thirds with my spatula next time.

And on a completely different topic ... I'm trying to make good turkey for deli-style sandwiches, a lot like the kind of turkey that Whole Foods sells for $11/lb. I bought a pound of ground turkey, but I'm already starting to think that that was the wrong choice. Where should I buy the meat (Schnucks had nothing)? And how do I cook the meat
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Old 08-29-2007, 07:24 PM   #8
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Deli-style normally means sliced - you'll have to come up with a different recipe for your ground turkey.

I would buy an organic turkey breast (one with no solution injected in it) and brine it in apple juice, kosher salt, brown sugar, garlic, thyme, rosemary, limes, oranges and then smoke it or bake it or off-set grill it. I have no idea what kind of deli turkey whole foods sells.
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Old 08-29-2007, 07:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdthescroll View Post
I haven't been breaking the meat up; I'll try breaking it into thirds with my spatula next time.
What is it that you are trying to make with the meat? If you are using it as ground meat then you need to break it up a lot more than just thirds. Your goal should be to try to separate each little piece of meat. Really break it up, like into hundreds or thousands of pieces.

Now if you are making burger or meatloaf or some other formed type meat then you do not want to break it up that way, but if you are just cooking it to throw into a pasta dish or something like that then you want to break it up as much as possible.
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Old 08-29-2007, 09:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
What is it that you are trying to make with the meat? If you are using it as ground meat then you need to break it up a lot more than just thirds. Your goal should be to try to separate each little piece of meat. Really break it up, like into hundreds or thousands of pieces.

Now if you are making burger or meatloaf or some other formed type meat then you do not want to break it up that way, but if you are just cooking it to throw into a pasta dish or something like that then you want to break it up as much as possible.
interesting; I'm not making patties with it, I'm a health junkie and want to be eating 1/3 lb of either type of meat at a time, so thirds are convenient to me in that way. do you still recommend breaking it up into tiny pieces?
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