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Old 04-05-2008, 02:15 AM   #1
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Pork shoulder-- Barbeque

I have a 10 lb pork shoulder I planned to grill with some friends tomorrow, but it occured to me that the grill we use is an open grill (not a Weber with a lid). The meat is probably a minimum 5 inches thick all around (if not more).

Will this cook through on the grill or will we destroy it before it becomes edible?

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Old 04-05-2008, 06:39 AM   #2
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Without a lid I'm afraid that's not going to work. I would rub it with a mixture of kosher salt, garlic salt, and ground black pepper then do it in a crockpot/slow cooker. It's probably going to take 6-8 hours. You can let it cook as is the whole time, pull the meat and serve with sauces on the side. Or, after four hours remove most of the liquid and replace with BBQ sauce and finish it that way.

Add some onion and green peppers to a can of Bush's beans along with a little brown sugar, and BBQ sauce. Make some Cole Slaw, and you're good to go.
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Old 04-05-2008, 08:04 AM   #3
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Agree with John, I don't see how it can be cooked on a grill without a cover of some sort.

Another idea is do it in the oven.
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Old 04-05-2008, 08:23 AM   #4
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You could start it on the grill (charchoal I assume) to get some of that grill flavor, then finish it in the oven.
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Old 04-05-2008, 09:48 AM   #5
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Remove the fat cap...season with your favorite BBQ rub...roast on a rack in the oven/drip pan underneath at 200-250 until done....180* Sliceable & pullable......190*-195* Pullable.

Enjoy!
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Old 04-05-2008, 10:52 AM   #6
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You can also do it very nicely in your oven. Place a large pan on the bottom rack with apple juice. Place your oiled, salted and peppered (fat cap removed or fat cap up - removed is better and it won't dry out so don't worry) meat directly on the rack above. Have oven preheated to 225 degrees F. Just sit back and wait - at least 10 - 12 hours. You want the internal temp to reach at least 200. You WANT that brown bark on the outside to form - it's priceless! You certainly don't want anything below 190 - it makes a world of difference.
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:00 AM   #7
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You want the internal temp to reach at least 200. You WANT that brown bark on the outside to form - it's priceless! You certainly don't want anything below 190 - it makes a world of difference.

Hello,

I am curious why you reccomend an internal temp of 200-190. How does that change the meat? I always hear the random temp of 165 for pork, but I am guessing that is just the safety temp. I always thought cooking to 200 would dry out the meat, but I guess that probably depends on the cut of pork

Thanks in advance
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:14 AM   #8
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Hello,

I am curious why you reccomend an internal temp of 200-190. How does that change the meat? I always hear the random temp of 165 for pork, but I am guessing that is just the safety temp. I always thought cooking to 200 would dry out the meat, but I guess that probably depends on the cut of pork

Thanks in advance
165 is for lean pork like the loin, etc.

190-200 is for the cheaper, tougher cuts like the shoulder. There is a ton of connective tissue that needs to break down to make it tender. You need to cook these at a low temperature for a long period of time to reach good results.
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:14 AM   #9
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Hi WorseCookHere - the piece of meat this is - pork butt (which is actually the shoulder), is a very tough but fatty piece of meat. It won't dry out cooking to 200. The reason 190 - 200 is that at this temp the connective tissue breaks down and the meat becomes pullable (you take two forks and actually just shred it VERY easily). This is what pulled pork sandwiches are made with. Yes, pork is done at a much lower temperature. However, THIS particular piece of meat will be tough at that temp and you will have to cut it. While edible, you're missing out on a real treat. I did mine in the oven (description above) one Christmas Eve, it cooked for about 20 hours, it was like butter!!!!!! I cooked it according to temperature, not hours per pound.

I hope that helps explain.
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:16 AM   #10
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The different temps represent different things. The 165 F indicates the meat is cooked through. The higher temps indicate they are cooked enough to be 'pullable'. That is, shredded for a pulled pork dish.

When the meat reaches the higher temps, the connective tissues that bind the meat together breakdown so the meat is easily shredded.
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