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Old 12-25-2005, 01:50 PM   #1
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Pot Roast Help Needed!!

first off, if you have a TNT pot roast recipe that you would like to share, please post it in this thread...i am very much open to suggestions!!

i have a recipe that i plan on using (unless someone posts one hear that looks better) that i got from todays episode of "how to boil water".

it starts it off on the stovetop in a dutch oven and them moves the dutch oven into the oven for a few hours.

i dont own either a dutch oven or a slow-cooker...so it looks like a purchase is in order. and that is basicaly my question...which is more versatile, and will give me more practical use?

should i get a slow cooker or a dutch oven?? what kinds of both do you all suggest and what is the approx. cost??

TIA!!

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Old 12-25-2005, 03:16 PM   #2
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mugsy, I just use a roasting pan for my pot roasts. Yes, I do have Dutch ovens and slow cookers, but find myself using the old fashioned way 95% of the time. You can cover the roasting pan with foil if you don't have a lid for it. A good decent weight 13x9x2 cake pan will even do the job.
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Old 12-25-2005, 03:30 PM   #3
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interesting!! i dont even have a roasting pan...am i better off going this route?? again, im thinking versatality.

i have been leaning twards the dutch over, only because i figure i can use it to boil larger dishes (seafood, ribs, etc) in.
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Old 12-25-2005, 08:08 PM   #4
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A Dutch oven is always handy to have on hand; the one I have is a big cast iron one. As you said, you want something that you will use for all different kinds of cooking. A roasting pan or even a good cake pan is another thing that is indispensible. I think that it really all depends on what you would prefer and think that you will use the most. BTW, keep meaning to tell you that your tag-line makes me think that you might be related somehow to my family!!!! LOL!!
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Old 12-25-2005, 09:05 PM   #5
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Mugsy, I recommend you go with the Dutch oven first. It's an essential for cooking, and can be used for all kinds of things...deep-frying, roasts, soups, stews, spaghetti sauce, etc.
I have a new Calaphon dutch oven that I think is great. If you're only going to have one, I suggest you consider this one. I also have a magnalite that I like very much, but I think the company may be out of business.
Whatever you choose, buy the best you can afford. Good cookware can last a lifetime if you take care of it. I still have my mother's cast aluminum dutch oven that she got for a wedding present when she got married in 1946. And it still makes the best pot roast.
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Old 12-26-2005, 12:44 AM   #6
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for pot roasts, a good, large, heavy bottomed pot with a lid, like a dutch oven is the way to go, imo. a pot roast, as opposed to other roasts like chicken or standing rib, is really braised in a liquid, not roasted on a rack in a roasting pan. so a pot is in order, hence pot roast. i use a really old stainless steel 8 qt. farberware pot to make my pot roasts.
this is the same pot i use for everything from tom yum to sunday gravy, so a dutch oven or heavy bottomed stock pot can be very versatile.

for my pot roast, i trim all sinew away from the outside of a rump, bottom, or even an eye round roast, then roll it, pressing it in a rub of fresh cracked black pepper, sea salt, paprika, onion and garlic powder, celery seed, dried oregano, thyme, marjoram, and savory.
the rubbed roast is browned/seared in oil over medium high heat on all sides in the pot, then it is set aside and the pot deglazed with red or white wine; whatever is open.
the roast is returned to the pot with the wine, and a few 1/2'd carrots, onions, and stalks of celery are placed around the meat. a 50/50 mix of water and wine is added to bring the liquid level up to about 1/3rd to 1/2 up the sides of the roast. the heat is turned to low, a few bay leaves tossed in, and the pot covered to allow the roast to braise slowly.
check it every once in a while to make sure it is on a low simmer, and turn the meat occasionally. when the meat is fork tender and falling apart or shredding easily, it is done. the veggies should be well cooked, and can be served as a side veggie, or blended in to the remaining liquid to start the makings of the gravy.
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Old 12-26-2005, 07:53 AM   #7
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I have a cast iron dutch oven that I purchased a very long time ago. I got it because my grandmother always made the most tender pot roast dinners and that was what she used. Now, however, I use a large crock pot and like that much better. I think it's better because you don't have to use the oven and/or stove top for an extended period of time to cook a tender roast. The roast never fails to literally fall apart using the crock pot and there is likely less energy used, no watching, easy cleanup, and absolutely excellent results. I would definitely suggest getting a large crock pot.
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Old 12-26-2005, 12:17 PM   #8
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Mugsy,
I generally make my pot roasts in my roaster (18qt GE thing that looks like a crockpot on steroids - WalMart $28) I put a large roast (4-5lbs) in it, along with seasonings (garlic garni, pepper, or whatever strikes me at the moment), some beef broth, and minced garlic and onion. I cook that for 3-5 hours on a low setting, then add red potoatoes, carrots, celery, etc...for a couple more hours. It always comes out quite tender, and I can use my oven for making the bread to go with it.
Best advice: always ask your butcher to find you the best cut!
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Old 12-26-2005, 12:32 PM   #9
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The pot that everyone forgets is the pressure cooker. And it is also an extremely versatile pot. You can make rice in it, in a fraction of the time it takes to bil or steam it. It cooks any meat that is supposed to be well done to tender perfection in less than half the time it takes in an oven, on the stovetop, or in a slow cooker. And I have had roasts come out very tough from the slow cooker. I have never had a tough piece of meat from a pressure cooker. Chili, boiled dinner, venison, boiled veggies, you name it, and I've made it in a pressure cooker (now you have to be reasnable here).

For a pressure cooked pot roast, heat up a heavy, fry pan. While it is heating, place peeled, halved potatoes, sliced carrots, quartered onions, a few cloves of garlic, and enough water to cover the veggies into the pot. Sear the meat on all sides, to brown it a little. Transfer it to the pot, on top of the veggies, season with S & P, and a bit of Oregano, and place the lid on securley. My pressure cooker allows me to select from 5, 10, and 15 lb. settings. For this dish, I would use the 15 lb. setting. Then, cook that roast for 30 minutes, or about 5 minutes per lb. Remove the pot from the heat, and let all of the steam and pressure escape before removing the lid (follow maunfacturer's instructions). You should have a perfect pot roast. And you just have to try cooking ribs in a pressure cooker. You get moist, fall off of the bones goodness.

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Old 12-26-2005, 01:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mugsy27
first off, if you have a TNT pot roast recipe that you would like to share, please post it in this thread...i am very much open to suggestions!!

i have a recipe that i plan on using (unless someone posts one hear that looks better) that i got from todays episode of "how to boil water".

it starts it off on the stovetop in a dutch oven and them moves the dutch oven into the oven for a few hours.

i dont own either a dutch oven or a slow-cooker...so it looks like a purchase is in order. and that is basicaly my question...which is more versatile, and will give me more practical use?

should i get a slow cooker or a dutch oven?? what kinds of both do you all suggest and what is the approx. cost??

TIA!!
mugsy, would like to see the recipe you have in mind.

Re cooking apparatuses: A broiler pan/roaster will do just fine. A Dutch oven, for me, is a necessity, as I use it to prepare so many dishes. The slow cooker, I use rarely, but it is inexpensive and a quick tool to have to save time. If you don't already have a 'basic' set of cooking pots n pans, check around, as there are many price ranges to suit everyone's pocket. A basic set usually includes, saucepans, skillet, covers and a Dutch oven - about 7 pieces.

The roast - I cut slits in the roast and insert garlic cloves. Sometimes I use a dry onion/mushroom soup mixture, or add red wine or coffee... & lots of onions, carrots, potatoes or veggies of choice and more shrooms.
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