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Old 08-30-2005, 07:35 PM   #1
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Pressure Cooking Times...

I have had a look around the net & cannot find any 'Rule of Thumb' times for cooking meats in a pressure cooker.

I was going to try a corned silverside the other night but chickened out and cooked it the usual way.

Are their 'ROT' times for beef, lamb, veal, chicken etc?

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Old 08-30-2005, 11:36 PM   #2
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I don't know how accurate it is - but here is one chart.

I did a Google search on "pressure cooking times" and found these you might also want to look at.
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Old 08-31-2005, 09:29 AM   #3
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Brooksy, I use my pressure cooker extensively since I started cooking. Here are some of my tips.

- Ensure there is water in whatever you are cooking. The water helps create vapor pressure that cooks the food. If you don't add water the food will burn rather quickly.

- The amount of water should not be in excess. So good rule of thumb is just to cover the food surface with water. I normally add 1 to !1/2 large glasses of water to my food. I stir in the water to combine with whatever I am cooking and then close the lid.

- Another good rule of thumb is to keep the flame on high when you first start cooking your food in the pressure cooker. My pressure cooker has two modes of cooking (1 and 2). I start in mode 1 and leave the flame on high. When the pressure starts to build and I hear a hissing sound, I turn it to 2 and reduce the heat to medium low and let the food cook for 30 minutes or so on low.

- For tender cuts of meat (chicken) the stew or whatever you are cooking should be done in a total of 30 minutes
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Old 08-31-2005, 09:31 AM   #4
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Not sure what happened while I was trying to type anyway, for lamb, beef and other red meats I normally have to go for 45 minutes to 50 minutes. I normally cook stews so if the meat is larger than it will be about an hour.

Also beans are done in approximately 30 - 40 minutes.

My mother in law even cooks her veggies in a pressure cooker. It is done in 15 minutes or so.

I love the pressure cooker because it's so fast. You can come home from work, season your meat, throw it in the pressure cooker, add some water to it and it is ready in an hour or so. Can't beat that.
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Old 09-01-2005, 12:35 PM   #5
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The only problem with a pressure cooker is that your meat is always well done. I like my meat just done to the level where it's safe for eating.

But veggies, stews, even things like boiled dinner are amazing in the pressure cooker, as are corned beef, a tough roast, etc.

And don't chicken out. If you ruin a meal, learn from it. You won't ruin it twice. You can only gain true knowledge from experience. So as the TV add for a particular running shoe says, "just do it".
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Old 09-02-2005, 08:56 PM   #6
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Thank you all for your replies & info.

I'm starting to enjoy the PC. I did a pot roast in it the other night and it turned out really good.

Goody, I love my corned silverside & wasn't prepared to destroy it on first try, so now I've practised on the rolled brisket, I'll do the silverside next.

Thanks also Michael for the links, I've bookmarked them for later reference.

Yakuta - between you and Goody, how can I go wrong thank you.

The recipe for the pot roast I tried is as follows, turned out really good for a first try - if anyone remember my first try at bread, this was the total opposite.

1 Kg Pot Roast - 3 - 4" thick
2Tblsp Fat (I used OO)
2 Cups tomatoes, canned
1/4 cup Dry Red Wine
3/4 cup onions, chopped
1/4 cup Carrot, finely chopped
1/4 Cup Celery, finely chopped
2 Chillis finely chopped, seeds & pith removed
1 clove Garlic, minced (I used a BIG clove)
1 tspn Salt
1/4 tspn Pepper
1/2 tspn Oregano
1/2 tspn basil
2 TBlsp AP Flour
1/4 Cup water

Method:
Brown meat all over in PC pot. Add remaining ingedients except for Flour & water. Cover, set control & cook for 35 - 45 minutes (I left it for 45 mins). Cool cooker normally for 5 minutes, then force cool. Remove meatfrom cooker. Mix flour & water until smooth, add to pot juices & cook until thickened, stirring constantly.
The veges dissolve into the gravy - bewdiful.

I served it with 'taters, peas & corn and heaps of gravy.

Thanks again people, you're a great mob.
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Old 09-22-2005, 10:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
And don't chicken out. If you ruin a meal, learn from it. You won't ruin it twice. You can only gain true knowledge from experience. So as the TV add for a particular running shoe says, "just do it".
Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
It is very true... I also learned to use pressure cooker effectively fairly recently. And sometimes you have to go through that trial and failure process... the timing slightly vary from the type of the pressure cooker you are using, and some people like the vegetables al dente, and some people like it very, very soft, and you have to find just the right measure for you. (But the chart that Mike gave you seems just about right for many things...)

I also found out my polpettone-meatloaf comes out much nicer when it is cooked in the pressure cooker... it remains very moist and wouldn't dry out...it takes just about half an hour for my average 700-800g (1lb and a half) chunk, cook in the basket, and at the bottom put about a cup of redwine, bayleaf and some green peppercorns (if available)... this will blend in with the dripping and when it is cooked a little further after extracting the meatloaf, makes a lovely sauce!!
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Old 09-22-2005, 11:27 AM   #8
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My pressure cooker came with a booklet that outlined cooking times for basic things.

I also bought a cheap PC cookbook that has an extensive list of cooking times and suggestions.
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