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Old 08-17-2010, 10:55 AM   #1
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Sausage Treasure Chest

Sausages for kids and big kids have always been popular in my family, so I have collected some exceedingy good recipes for you guys to try at home.


Best bangers and beans - ever.
Preparation time less than 30 minutes

Cooking time between 10 and 30 minutes.

6 flavoured meat sausages, i.e. venison, wild boar, pork etc
3 tbsp/45g clear honey
2 tbsp/30g grain mustard
1 tsp chopped fresh thyme
olive oil
125g/4oz diced pancetta or streaky bacon
paprika
½ red chilli, chopped (optional)
1 large tin of baked beans

1. Cook the sausages in a frying pan in a little olive oil and colour on all sides. Once cooked, remove from the pan, return the pan up to a high heat and add the honey, cook for about 30 seconds before adding the grain mustard and thyme and then place the sausages back into the pan and coat with the glaze. Remove and set aside.
2. Meanwhile, cook the diced pancetta or bacon in a little olive oil with a tsp of paprika and chilli if using. Once the bacon is crisp, add the whole tin of baked beans and cook for a few minutes before serving with the glazed sausages and a baked potato (optional).
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More bangers and beans!

Tell them this is what cowboys have for dinner. Children really seem to fall for that stuff.
You need
Olive oil
Sausages ( 2 per child)
1 onion (finely chopped)
1 400g can cannellini beans
1 400g can tomatoes
1 tbsp black treacle or golden
syrup or dark brown sugar
2 tsp Worcestershire sauce

Fry the sausages in the oil in a heavy-based frying pan, then take them out while you cook the onions in the sausage juice until they're golden. Add the beans (rinsed), tomatoes, treacle/syrup/sugar, the Worcestershire sauce and 150ml boiling water. Cook for a few minutes and then put in the sausages and bring to one glorious crescendo!


~ * ~ * ~


Canned beans are a great base for a quick meal. Adapt some of the pasta sauces to stir in with them, such as that old favourite - pesto and potatoes.


You need
2 medium potatoes (peeled and diced)
2 tins of your favourite beans (perhaps not kidney)
A bit less than half of one jar of ready-made pesto, or some of your home-made
50g butter
1 tbsp olive oil

Cook the potatoes and about five minutes before they are done, add the beans, washed of all their tinny juices. Drain and put veg aside. Put the pan back on the heat, mix the butter, olive oil and pesto until it all sizzles, then gently tip back the beans and potatoes and give a stir. Serve up with grated cheese.
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Nigel Slater's.....

Sausage Toad with Browned Onion and Madeira Gravy


(His words)

I am not sure that getting fancy with a classic dish like toad in the hole can come to any good. I have added mustard because I think it flatters the sausage, and wrapped the bangers in ham to make the dish more substantial, but that is as far as I go. This dish has a homely quality that defies meddling. There are those who like a bit of batter with their sausages and those who prefer a bit of sausage, with their batter. I am fondest of the batter - both the crusty bits on top and the soggy underneath - so I make my toad in a wide dish to give plenty of room around the sausages for the batter to swell. Then, of course, there's onion gravy

Serves 4

2 eggs
1 cup all-purpose flour
2/3 cup milk mixed with 2/3 cup cold water
1 level tablespoon grain mustard
6 fat, herby pork sausages
4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, pancetta, serrano ham or even thin streaky bacon
3 tbsp. drippings or lard

Method:
Mix the eggs, flour, milk, mustard and some salt and pepper together with a whisk, beating out any little lumps of flour as you go. The consistency should be about that of heavy cream, but no thinner. Leave to rest for fifteen minutes.

Cut the skin from each sausage and peel off. Wrap each skinned sausage in prosciutto or whatever you are using. Put the dripping or lard in a baking pan - I use a 11 x 8 inch roasting pan - and place in an oven preheated to 425F until it is smoking. Pour in the batter - it will sizzle softly in the hot fat - then arrange the sausages in it. Bake for twenty-five to thirty minutes, till puffed and golden. Serve with Browned Onion and Madeira Gravy.


Browned Onion and Madeira Gravy


I first intended this gravy to be poured over my toad in the hole but now make it for mashed potatoes, potato cakes, liver and braised vegetables (it is sensational with celery that has been braised in vegetable stock). It keeps for a couple of days in the fridge and is glorious poured over steaming hot, over bubble and squeak.

a very thick slice of butter
2 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced
flour, no more than a level tablespoon
1/3 cup Madeira, Marsala or red wine
1 cups stock
Worcestershire sauce

Melt the butter in a heavy based pan, add the onions and cook over a low heat till golden and soft. Now continue cooking, covered with a lid, until the onions are truly brown and soft enough to crush between your fingers.

Stir in a level heaped tablespoon of flour and cook for a few minutes until it has lightly browned, then pour in the liquids. Season with salt and pepper and Worcestershire sauce and bring to a boil. Turn down the heat so that the gravy bubbles gently and leave for about fifteen minutes, stirring from time to time.
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And best ever mashed potato to enjoy with the above.


For a fluffy mash, rich with butter, this recipe is the one for you.
Prep time: 20 min
Cook time: 20 min
Serves 4

2 lb /900 g floury potatoes, such as King Edwards, Maris Piper or Desirée
3½ / 100g butter 100ml hot milk, not essential but gives a fluffier mash

Rinse the potatoes, put them in a large pan of cold water and bring up to the boil. Salt generously and partially cover with a lid. Simmer until the potatoes are tender to the point of a knife, then drain them.

Pull off the skins - they should peel away easily. You can wear rubber gloves if you like, or struggle with an oven glove. I hold them in my hands as best I can and tell myself a little pain is good for me.

Throw the hot, peeled potatoes back into the pan and return them to the heat. Hold them briefly over the heat to dry off completely and become even fluffier. Mash them with the butter using a metal potato masher. There should be no lumps.

Pour in the milk, which should be hot rather than boiling, and beat the mixture with a wooden spoon or Kenwood beater till it is fluffy and light. You might want to add more salt. One must work quickly if the mash is to be hot. And it must be hot, and buttery, gloriously buttery.

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Old 08-18-2010, 05:29 AM   #2
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Sausage with White Beans and Herbs - a simple, tasty sausage dish perfect for children.

There's a bistro-like minimalism to this dish that is so easy it feels almost criminal to take credit for cooking it. Fresh sage makes it taste fully homemade.
Serves 4.

450g / 1lb of sausages
olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
2 tins of white beans
fresh sage (or rosemary)
fresh lemon juice
salt
freshly ground black pepper

In a large pan over a medium heat, brown the sausages on all sides and cook through. Once cooked, set them aside on a plate. In the same pan, add a little olive oil and the chopped garlic. Cook, stirring, until fragrant. Add the drained beans and sage (or rosemary) and heat through. Spritz with lemon juice and season with salt and pepper if necessary. Serve in bowls with the sausage on top.
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Next, Sunday Breakfast Cakes - made from sausages


A dish that will stand or fall by the quality of the sausages you choose. I prefer a good old-fashioned butcher's sausage with plenty of pepper and herbs in it. A slightly spicy one would be fun, too. The egg is entirely optional, as are any other ingredients you may want to include, like a little crumbled black pudding in the patties or some fried mushrooms or tomatoes on the side. Essentially a breakfast dish, but I have eaten this as a quick supper on occasion, too.

SERVES 4
http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking#subs
back or streaky bacon – 8oz / 250g
good, herby butcher's sausages – 1lb / 500g
fresh white breadcrumbs – 2 large handfuls
a handful of parsley
thyme leaves – a tablespoon
oil for frying
eggs – 4 (optional)

Remove and discard the rind from the bacon, then roughly chop the rashers and put them into a food processor. Slit the sausage skins down their length, peel them off and add the sausage meat to the bacon. Blitz briefly to produce a coarse mince. Take care not to over-process – you want the texture to be quite rough.

Tip into a mixing bowl, and add the breadcrumbs, chopped parsley and thyme leaves. Check the seasoning: you may need a little more salt and black pepper, depending on the sausages. Mix well with your hands and shape into 8 thick flattish patties.

If you are frying the patties, then warm a little oil in a non-stick pan, and cook them on each side for about 5 minutes till golden. Check that they are cooked right through to the middle. Drain on kitchen paper. Alternatively, grill them till golden. Fry the eggs in a little oil then slide them onto 4 warm plates with the patties.
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Hot Crust Sausage Roll

I guarantee you will squeal with delight on tasting these darling little Hot Crust Sausage Rolls. Aaaand - they look even better than this picture. A sausage roll with a hidden spicy hit, so watch out!



Or how to turn a packet of ordinary sausages into lip-tingling marvels.

8oz / 250g plain flour, plus more for rolling
1 teaspoon chilli flakes
3 teaspoons paprika, not the hot one
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking powder
scant 8oz / 225g ice-cold unsalted butter cut into 1cm cubes
175ml cold milk
1lb / 500g sausages, any sort
1 medium onion, very finely chopped
1 handful chopped parsley
1 beaten egg

Mix the flour, chilli, paprika, salt, baking powder and butter in a bowl, then stir in the milk to make a lumpy dough. Using lots of flour, roll this to 30cm across, then fold it in by thirds, roll again, fold again and chill for 30 minutes. Repeat twice more at half-hourly intervals.

Strip the sausages of their casings, and mix the meat with the onion and parsley. Roll the dough to about 30cm by 45cm and cut into three 30cm by 15cm strips. Divide the meat into three, roll each piece into a stick about 30cm long, and lay one in the centre of each dough strip. Fold the dough around the meat, to enclose the filling, and seal with water.

Press each roll flattish, cut it into pieces and place seam-side down on an oven tray lined with baking paper. Brush with egg, slash the top and bake at 200C (180C fan-assisted) /400F/gas mark 6 for 40 minutes if they're large, less if they're small.
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Old 08-19-2010, 12:09 PM   #3
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About this recipe:

Quote:
Nigel Slater's.....

Sausage Toad with Browned Onion and Madeira Gravy


(His words)

I am not sure that getting fancy with a classic dish like toad in the hole can come to any good. I have added mustard because I think it flatters the sausage, and wrapped the bangers in ham to make the dish more substantial, but that is as far as I go. This dish has a homely quality that defies meddling. There are those who like a bit of batter with their sausages and those who prefer a bit of sausage, with their batter. I am fondest of the batter - both the crusty bits on top and the soggy underneath - so I make my toad in a wide dish to give plenty of room around the sausages for the batter to swell. Then, of course, there's onion gravy

Serves 4

2 eggs
1 cup all-purpose flour
2/3 cup milk mixed with 2/3 cup cold water
1 level tablespoon grain mustard
6 fat, herby pork sausages
4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, pancetta, serrano ham or even thin streaky bacon
3 tbsp. drippings or lard

Method:
Mix the eggs, flour, milk, mustard and some salt and pepper together with a whisk, beating out any little lumps of flour as you go. The consistency should be about that of heavy cream, but no thinner. Leave to rest for fifteen minutes.

Cut the skin from each sausage and peel off. Wrap each skinned sausage in prosciutto or whatever you are using. Put the dripping or lard in a baking pan - I use a 11 x 8 inch roasting pan - and place in an oven preheated to 425F until it is smoking. Pour in the batter - it will sizzle softly in the hot fat - then arrange the sausages in it. Bake for twenty-five to thirty minutes, till puffed and golden. Serve with Browned Onion and Madeira Gravy.


Browned Onion and Madeira Gravy


I first intended this gravy to be poured over my toad in the hole but now make it for mashed potatoes, potato cakes, liver and braised vegetables (it is sensational with celery that has been braised in vegetable stock). It keeps for a couple of days in the fridge and is glorious poured over steaming hot, over bubble and squeak.

a very thick slice of butter
2 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced
flour, no more than a level tablespoon
1/3 cup Madeira, Marsala or red wine
1 cups stock
Worcestershire sauce

Melt the butter in a heavy based pan, add the onions and cook over a low heat till golden and soft. Now continue cooking, covered with a lid, until the onions are truly brown and soft enough to crush between your fingers.

Stir in a level heaped tablespoon of flour and cook for a few minutes until it has lightly browned, then pour in the liquids. Season with salt and pepper and Worcestershire sauce and bring to a boil. Turn down the heat so that the gravy bubbles gently and leave for about fifteen minutes, stirring from time to time.
My husband and I did this recipe last night, and really had fun in the kitchen. The picture looks fantastic, so we were scratching our heads wondering why the recipe called for an 11X8 inch pan?? Didn't make sense to either of us, when we wanted the results from the picture. We used two 9" Pyrex pie plates instead, with spectacular results just like the picture, although we used two fat sausages per plate. It was fun to watch the batter puff up through the oven window. My husband is an Engineer, and it's hard for him to not follow directions EXACTLY, but in the end he agreed my pie plate idea was correct.
I had never had anything like this before, however he vaguely remembered enjoying it in England many many years ago.
The gravy is a must, and the whole thing was delicious. We will certainly do it again.
Thanks for the recipe.
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Old 08-19-2010, 12:57 PM   #4
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Oh Kayelle, I am so pleased you tried and loved this lovely sausage recipe with the onion gravy! I feel honoured from your praises. A big thank you!

That pan, 11 x8 it's a roasting pan which one would use for a small joint of beef. Its sides are about 3-4 inches high, the pan itself pressed steel, cheap and there are loads of them around.

That recipe using batter to nestle the sausages in, is also fondly known in England as "Toad in the hole". Fitting, eh?
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Old 08-19-2010, 01:35 PM   #5
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Quote:
That recipe using batter to nestle the sausages in, is also fondly known in England as "Toad in the hole". Fitting, eh?
Yes, my husband said it was called "Toad in the Hole", however in light of my comments on the recent "Frog Legs" thread, I think I'll find another name for it.
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Old 08-19-2010, 02:03 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Yes, my husband said it was called "Toad in the Hole", however in light of my comments on the recent "Frog Legs" thread, I think I'll find another name for it.

Would just love to know it!
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Old 08-19-2010, 06:10 PM   #7
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I have always wanted to make Toad in the hole ever since they used to talk about it in that episode of Are You Being Served? And I am definately going to try the bangers and beans! Time to think about the grocery list for the week.

I hope the local market still carrys HP!!!!!
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Old 08-19-2010, 06:39 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by DaveSoMD View Post
I have always wanted to make Toad in the hole ever since they used to talk about it in that episode of Are You Being Served? And I am definately going to try the bangers and beans! Time to think about the grocery list for the week.

I hope the local market still carrys HP!!!!!
HP Sauce deffy is in existence.


I always buy two bottles of the stuff because my family are so up for it!

And.. the Madeira gravy is a must.
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Old 08-19-2010, 06:55 PM   #9
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Here in the states it can be hard to find. My one local marked used to carry it but I haven't looked for it in a while. If not I can always order online.
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Old 08-21-2010, 09:26 AM   #10
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Oh, dearie me. I'm going to have to hide this line from my husband (not difficult to do as he doesn't mess with email in any way shape or form). If he sees this, I can see an entire week of sausage mania. When we were younger, we went to Hong Kong, and the first thing he wanted to do? Have an English breakfast of bangers and mash. (It was yummy!). He just loves, LOVES sausage.
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