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Old 09-20-2010, 05:44 PM   #11
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But the phrase itself has a nice ring to it....:D
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Old 09-21-2010, 07:41 PM   #12
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Searing meat brings it up to the Maillard point. Its a reaction that causes that great flavor. To get the reaction the meat has to reach a temp between 300F-500F.

You do that with meat by searing it or with roasts you can start with a VERY hot oven and then turn the heat down if you don't want to sear it.
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Old 09-23-2010, 01:09 AM   #13
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I seared 2 pounds of oxtails last night for soup, you should see the broth, deep brown, rich and the flavor!!! I'll finish off the soup tomorrow night with veggies and barley.
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Old 09-23-2010, 05:46 PM   #14
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All you need to do is look at the meat as it's cooking. Sear one side of a steak, or pork chop, or chicken breast. Turn it over, and after a few more minutes of cooking, you will see juices begin to ooze from the meat surface. That's how I make decisions about my cooking techniques. I observe what's going on. If you do that, then you will become the expert.

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Old 11-28-2010, 10:49 AM   #15
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Interesting. It makes sense, but just goes to show you to not just take the "experts" at their word. I'll have to do my own experiment now. The crust on meats sure does taste good, though.
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Old 11-28-2010, 02:52 PM   #16
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OK. I'm going to get a bit gross here. Why do they cauterize tissue to seal blood vessels? I was a funeral director/embalmer for a few years when back in my 20's. Cauterization, burning of tissue, would damage the tissue, but create a seal. It is a technique/used in this profession to, well, you figure it out. It was expecially effective with accident victims or decaying tissue. It is also used for chronic bloody noses. So, It may damage the tissue, but that will also change the physical make up of it and create a non porous surface that will keep fluids in. So, I'm not totally convinced that searing meat doesn't seal in juices...

Sorry, if I grossed you out. But, the same principles apply, here.
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Old 11-28-2010, 02:56 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
OK. I'm going to get a bit gross here. Why do they cauterize tissue to seal blood vessels? I was a funeral director/embalmer for a few years when back in my 20's. Cauterization, burning of tissue, would damage the tissue, but create a seal. It is a technique/used in this profession to, well, you figure it out. It is also used for chronic bloody noses. So It may damage the tissue, but that will also change the physical make up of it and create a non porous surface that will keep fluids in. So, I'm not totally convinced that searing meat doesn't seal in juices...

Sorry, if I grossed you out.
I would guess that cauterizing causes scar tissue that seals the blood vessels.
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Old 11-28-2010, 03:25 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
OK. I'm going to get a bit gross here. Why do they cauterize tissue to seal blood vessels? I was a funeral director/embalmer for a few years when back in my 20's. Cauterization, burning of tissue, would damage the tissue, but create a seal. It is a technique/used in this profession to, well, you figure it out. It was expecially effective with accident victims or decaying tissue. It is also used for chronic bloody noses. So, It may damage the tissue, but that will also change the physical make up of it and create a non porous surface that will keep fluids in. So, I'm not totally convinced that searing meat doesn't seal in juices...

Sorry, if I grossed you out. But, the same principles apply, here.
It's not blood in the meats that we eat. There is nothing to cauterize. It's myoglobin.
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Old 11-28-2010, 03:54 PM   #19
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One cauterizes blood vessels to stop bleeding because the living body builds scar tissue to toughed the location of the burn.

In a corpse, the cauterizing wouldn't be done to muscle tissue (steaks) but to blood vessels and perhaps skin?

I guess you could test this for yourself by weighing a raw piece of meat then cooking it and weighing it again. If searing seals in juices, the before and after weights should be the same.
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Old 11-28-2010, 04:13 PM   #20
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Scar tissue won't form in something already dead.
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