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Old 10-26-2012, 10:31 PM   #1
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Seeking help pan frying lamb arm chops

I attempted to pan fry a lamb arm chop and it came out really bad. The chop buckled after cooking it for a few minutes on one side, and then it was impossible to cook it evenly. I'd really like to find a way to pan fry lamb because my broiler is not working properly and I won't be replacing it because I'm moving. I find lamb rib chops easier to pan fry, but they're much more expensive. Any suggestions?

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Old 10-26-2012, 10:50 PM   #2
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There are several different muscles that make up the arm chop (it's a shoulder chop around here). The connective tissue between the muscles contracts causing the distortion of the chop.

The simplest thing to do is put a press on the meat while it's cooking. If you don't have one handy, metal pie plate with a weight in it would do the trick.

My mom used to make these all the time in a braise with onions, string beans and tomato.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:15 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
There are several different muscles that make up the arm chop (it's a shoulder chop around here). The connective tissue between the muscles contracts causing the distortion of the chop.

The simplest thing to do is put a press on the meat while it's cooking. If you don't have one handy, metal pie plate with a weight in it would do the trick.

My mom used to make these all the time in a braise with onions, string beans and tomato.
Thanks Andy. Which press do you recommend? And how many minutes do you cook the chop on each side?
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Old 10-27-2012, 12:02 AM   #4
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Won't work, to much "silver skin" on the front shoulder. You must cut away the silver skin or braze it in the oven with a liquid for a few hours! Or pressure cook it with some stock and vegies. A very tough pice of meat that should never be over cooked unless being used in a flavor for sauce "gravy" and cooked for a long time. For flavor I would roast it, then use it for a flavor baste for a finer cut of lamb.I try to stay away from the front shoulder of an animal unless it's from a large anmial.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:34 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Thanks Andy. Which press do you recommend? And how many minutes do you cook the chop on each side?
Any press will do, round or rectangular, ridged or flat. As I said, even a pie plate and a canned good will do.

Shoulder chops aren't too thick. Just a couple of minutes per side depending on how much you like it cooked.
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:07 AM   #6
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Or another way is to make small slits around the outer edge. It will keep the chop from cupping. But the press is a great idea. And they are not expensive.

You can wrap a brick in foil and use that also or on the pie plate.
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:21 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Or another way is to make small slits around the outer edge. It will keep the chop from cupping. But the press is a great idea. And they are not expensive.

You can wrap a brick in foil and use that also or on the pie plate.
+1
I cut slits into the sides too and I have my foil wrapped brick right next to the hammer I nicked from hubby to bash things with
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.

Any press will do, round or rectangular, ridged or flat. As I said, even a pie plate and a canned good will do.

Shoulder chops aren't too thick. Just a couple of minutes per side depending on how much you like it cooked.
Glad to see this easy solution!
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:35 AM   #9
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Thanks Andy. Which press do you recommend? And how many minutes do you cook the chop on each side?
I don't know what Andy would recommend, but I use a number 8 skillet as a press in a number 9 skillet. The small bacon presses don't cover enough to make it worthwhile.

I'm talking cast iron, IMO the only pan for pan frying.
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:39 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68
I don't know what Andy would recommend, but I use a number 8 skillet as a press in a number 9 skillet. The small bacon presses don't cover enough to make it worthwhile.

I'm talking cast iron, IMO the only pan for pan frying.
I wish I could use cast iron pans but they are much too heavy for me. I checked out some of them recently at a cookware store nearby. I'm using a Calphalon grill pan for the lamb.
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