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Old 10-31-2008, 03:31 PM   #1
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Cream Chipped Beef

CREAM CHIPPED BEEF
2 TBSP butter
2 TBSP flour
finely chopped onion to taste
2 c milk
1-4oz pkg Buding Beef (The beef that is like 70 cents a pack...I dry it myself in the oven at 200 since dried beef is more expensive)
Salt and garlic pepper seasoning
Cayenne pepper to taste

Melt butter in saucepan over medium heat. Stir in flour until smooth and heat until bubbly. Gradually, stir in milk and continue stirring to keep from getting lumpy. The mixture-which is white sauce-will gradually thicken. Add the chipped beef (separate and cut into thin strips) and keep over low heat about 5 minutes. Salt and pepper as desired. Serve over toast, biscuits, mashed potato or baked potato.

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Old 10-31-2008, 03:35 PM   #2
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My all time most favorite breakfast when I was a kid.
Mom didn't make it very often, and when she did, I always
wished she would just plop the skillet and loaf of toast in front
of me and get out of the way.

Sighhh, always had to share.
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Old 10-31-2008, 03:50 PM   #3
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Yep GF... me too! Dad use to make this on Sunday mornings! Love it! Still have not been able to replicate the magic he did with it!
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Old 10-31-2008, 04:39 PM   #4
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The SOS recipe looks good. Only problem is, it seem's impossible to find the chipped beef that the military used to use.
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Old 10-31-2008, 05:55 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
The SOS recipe looks good. Only problem is, it seem's impossible to find the chipped beef that the military used to use.
When they got rid of the cavalry they no longer had to find a use for spent horses.....
OK, that was bad

I've gotta remember to pick up some canned beef next time I'm in the store. I'm sure I would love SOS.
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Old 10-31-2008, 06:26 PM   #6
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I use the chipped beef that comes in a jar...I believe the brand is Armour. But the Carl Budding is good, too. I just think it's a little saltier.
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Old 10-31-2008, 11:51 PM   #7
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Military style SOS was just browned hamburger used for the beef in creamed beef.
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Old 11-01-2008, 12:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Cottrell View Post
Military style SOS was just browned hamburger used for the beef in creamed beef.
During WW II, Korea and at aleast as recently as the Vietnam era ... SOS/creamed chipped beef was made with sliced dried beef that came in a couple of different commercial kitchen sized cans. Hamburger would have required refrigeration ... the dried beef didn't.

Dad used to get cans of the dried beef at the base, and I've eaten it at mess at Tinker AFB (Midwest City, OK), Turner AFB (Albany, GA), NAS Dallas (TX), NAS Millington (TN), NAS Jacksonville (FL) and when we were on our training cruse on the USS Lexington (CVS-16). Basically - 1955-1970. I never had it made with hamburger in the military.

Now, Mom did sometimes make it with hamburger, onions and green peas when we didn't have any dried beef - but she wasn't a military cook.

justplainbill - the Armour sliced dried beef is as close as I can remember to the "original" flavor. It's been a few years ... but it's not cheap these days.

squeaker - Albertson's also had their own brand (Good Day?) that was cheaper than Carl Buding (usually 2/$1 but often on sale for 4/$1) and actually tasted a little closer to the Armour dried beef. Although not "politically correct" - if you want something a little spicier you can try the packages of pastrami.

I have to admit - I ate so much of this stuff when I was growing up that whenever we had it for breakfast when I was in the Navy - it was comfort food.
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Old 11-01-2008, 12:42 AM   #9
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[Michael,
You said "we were on our training cruse on the USS Lexington (CVS-16). Basically - 1955-1970."
Didn't the Lexington get hit or go down at Pearl Harbor> Then you were on the second ship?[/B]
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Old 11-01-2008, 12:48 AM   #10
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Battle of the Coral Sea

Main article: Battle of the Coral Sea

Lexington burning during the Battle of the Coral Sea
Confirmed direct hits sustained by Lexington during the battle

On 7 May, search planes reported contact with an enemy carrier task force. Lexington's air group sank the light carrier Shōhō. Later that day, 12 bombers and 15 torpedo planes from still-unlocated heavy carriers Shōkaku and Zuikaku were intercepted by fighter groups from Lexington and Yorktown, which shot down nine enemy aircraft.

On the morning of the 8th, a Lexington plane located the Shōkaku group; a strike was immediately launched from the American carriers, and the Japanese carrier was heavily damaged. However, enemy planes penetrated the American defenses at 11:00, and 20 minutes later Lexington was struck by a torpedo to port. Seconds later, a second torpedo hit her portside directly abeam the bridge. At the same time, she took three bomb hits from enemy dive bombers, producing a 7 degree list to port and several raging fires. By 13:00, skilled damage control had brought the fires under control and restored her to an even keel; making 25 knots (29 mph/46 km/h), she was ready to recover her air group. Then suddenly Lexington was shaken by a tremendous explosion, caused by the ignition of gasoline vapors below, and again fire raged out of control. At 15:58, Captain Frederick Carl Sherman, fearing for the safety of men working below, secured salvage operations, and ordered all hands to the flight deck. At 17:01, he ordered "abandon ship" and the orderly disembarkation began. Men going over the side into the warm water were almost immediately picked up by nearby cruisers and destroyers. Admiral Aubrey Wray Fitch and his staff transferred to the cruiser Minneapolis; Captain Sherman and his executive officer, Commander Morton T. Seligman ensured all their men were safe, then were the last to leave.

Lexington blazed on, flames shooting hundreds of feet into the air. To prevent enemy capture, Destroyer Phelps closed to 1,500 yards (1,400 m) and fired two torpedoes into her hull; with one last heavy explosion, Lexington sank at 19:56, in [show location on an interactive map] 1520′S 15530′E / -15.333, 155.5.

[edit] Honors

Lexington received two battle stars for her World War II service.

In June 1942, five days after the Navy's public acknowledgement of the sinking, workers at the Quincy shipyard where the ship was built twenty-one years earlier cabled Navy Secretary Frank Knox and proposed a change in the name of a carrier currently under construction there to the USS Lexington (from the USS Cabot).[4] Knox agreed to the proposal, and by September 23, 1942 the fifth Lexington (CV-16) was launched.

My best girlfriend in Jr High and High Schools Dad was aboard her and was killed.
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