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Old 10-13-2013, 10:52 AM   #71
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When I was a kid I remember getting it. It was called "surplus food." I remember the brick of cheese, and I didn't like it because it was so hard to slice for a cheese sandwich. We also got these cans of beef chunks in gravy. I loved it, because we rarely got meat at home, but now that I think of it, it didn't actually say it was beef, and it didn't taste like beef. But it tasted good and it didn't kill me. Our circumstances were not my parent's fault, but I always swore I was never going to live like that, so I've always been a penny pincher.
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Old 10-13-2013, 11:36 AM   #72
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Loved the video of the elder in the first post! 91 years young!

I haven't read all the replies here yet but as a kid (when the depression was just barely in the past but my parents still felt the repercussions of it) we made Snow Ice Cream!

Fresh snow, evaporated milk and sugar, vanilla.

But I wouldn't suggest that anyone do that these days!!!!! But then it was a treat.
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Old 10-13-2013, 02:51 PM   #73
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When I was a kid I remember getting it. It was called "surplus food." I remember the brick of cheese, and I didn't like it because it was so hard to slice for a cheese sandwich. We also got these cans of beef chunks in gravy. I loved it, because we rarely got meat at home, but now that I think of it, it didn't actually say it was beef, and it didn't taste like beef. But it tasted good and it didn't kill me. Our circumstances were not my parent's fault, but I always swore I was never going to live like that, so I've always been a penny pincher.
We often get a 1-1/2# can of real beef in juices. I love it. After melting off the fat and juices I put that in the fridge in a tall tumbler and throw away the fat plug. It can then be turned into a really nice beef stew by adding a can or 1/3 package of mixed vegetables.

The meat can be turned into a tasty taco meat mixture, or chili.

We get 1% milk, 2 quarts, and often dried milk which comes in handy. Often large boxes of cereal, 4 cans of a vegetable, 2 cans of fruit, and 2 large bottles of fruit juice - grape, orange, apple, and cranberry.

There is usually some kind of starch. 5# bag of oatmeal, macaroni, or rice and dried beans.

Some of the other meats are Chili, no beans, lower sodium; 2 cans pink salmon, 2 large cans of chicken breast meat or 2 large cans of tuna.

It's really nice, and what I don't want, I pass along to a neighbor who doesn't qualify for her own.
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Old 10-13-2013, 03:44 PM   #74
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My first two kids were on evaporated milk formula after I stopped nursing. So I know they were passing out canned milk along with the powdered milk. There was no baby formula at that time. They also were passing out cream of wheat. I think a lot of the food they passed out was regional. I know when I went down to live in Texas, they passed out grits. I had never even heard of grits until then. My neighbor got some and brought it over to me and taught me how to cook it. She also got bulgur. I still don't know what that is. And from what I saw of it, I didn't want to know.
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Old 09-16-2014, 10:28 AM   #75
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I make something quite similar, no tomato sauce, and I use ham or leftover steak. To make it really good, scramble some eggs in with all of it.

I like a bit of ketchup on it when its done.

Potatoes are still a good bang for the buck. A 10lb bag of potatoes goes a long ways.
I do this to. Mine has hamburger, potatoes, onions, and scrambled eggs. Sometimes we add some cheddar cheese. I'm gonna try all these ideas now to.
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Old 09-16-2014, 11:09 AM   #76
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When I was a kid I remember getting it. It was called "surplus food." I remember the brick of cheese, and I didn't like it because it was so hard to slice for a cheese sandwich. We also got these cans of beef chunks in gravy. I loved it, because we rarely got meat at home, but now that I think of it, it didn't actually say it was beef, and it didn't taste like beef. But it tasted good and it didn't kill me. Our circumstances were not my parent's fault, but I always swore I was never going to live like that, so I've always been a penny pincher.
I think all children of Depression Era Parents became penny pinchers because of what our parents taught us. They carried over what they learned during the Depression not being certain of the future. I think we as their children were the better for what our parents learned and passed on.
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