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Old 09-30-2014, 08:28 AM   #11
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Gotta ask again WHY?

You have already prepaid your meal plan, so you're not broke student like I was when I ate carrots and peanut butter and ramen noodles every day for a year.

You suggest you want healthier alternatives but are stocking your kitchen with junk food and many suggestions here are for less than healthy alternatives.
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Old 09-30-2014, 08:59 AM   #12
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If you have a basic kitchen in the dorm how about making up some teams to shop, cook and clean up, once or twice a week. If everyone chips in the price of a fast food meal you should be able to buy the fixins for a complete pasta meal, Mom's meatloaf, taco bar, stir fry, pot of chili, homemade pizza and salad, etc...
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Old 09-30-2014, 11:37 PM   #13
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I went to Sam's Club and, partially based on recommendations from this thread, bought public-use Quaker oatmeal, Quaker grits, peanut butter, and Country Time lemonade-iced tea mix.

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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Kudos to you but none of that is healthy food so I'm not sure what you are aiming at here. Why not just eat off the meal plan which is already paid for?

Or is this late night munchie stuff?
Outright not using the meal plan is unrealistic. However, on campus eating is tremendously overpriced, and the one thousand dollars we're coerced to put into our accounts every semester is, like, 1.2 meals a day. We need to fill in the blanks - and encouraging people to use the kitchen is a good thing to do. Obviously they are advised to buy their own foods as well which may be healthier.

I realize not everything I've named is healthy but I'm taking feedback on ways to improve that. People have shown a very warm response to my kitchen work.

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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
can you describe your rinky-dink kitchen?

what tools (heat sources, sinks and sources of water, pots and pans, bunson burners, umm - and vents, etc.) do you have at your disposal?

have you thought about who is going to clean up?
Shoddy sink, low-end Whirlpool stove, Walmart brand microwave, plenty of pots (including several nonstick pans that have been ruined by public use), plates, bowls, cups, mugs, and silverware. Uuhh... Coffee machine, blender, toaster and toaster oven. For vents, we have an oven hood with a fan that doesn't actually expel the air but only recirculates it - setting off the smoke detector is a small concern.

Generally people are good at cleaning their dishes, and there are a few passive-aggressive notes around to encourage that. For spills and messes there is a cleaning crew that comes around every day.
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Old 10-01-2014, 12:45 AM   #14
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your kitchen sounds like it's fairly well equipped. well enough to make decent food.

ok, so the next question is how many people are served whever anyone cooks at any given time? is it for an individual, for roomies, or the entire floor?


i agree with many of the suggestions so far, especially pasta (to keep it healthy buy whole wheat), jars of tomato sauce or at least cans of tomatoes and dried herbs with which to make sauce, canned beans, rice, canned fish (tuna, mackerel, herring, etc), crackers or flatbreads (lasts longer than bread), canned fruit, pickled veggies (pickles, onions, chow chow, gardiniere), and lots of kinds of breakfast cereals.

a lot of this stuff is high in sodium, but that's why it lasts longer in a cupboard so drink a lot of water.


mmm, i could go for a tin of mackerel in olive oil and some wasa wholegrain crackers. or rollmopse and a crusty baguette.


you can also try to introduce fresh fruit by hanging a tiered basket with apples and oranges in it. bulk apples are cheap in the fall.
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Old 10-01-2014, 02:31 PM   #15
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Generally people just cook for themselves. Every once in a while people will bake enough of something to distribute in the lobby - generally just brownies or cookies with a few exceptions. That's something I'd love to encourage as well - hence the free-to-use canola oil, sugar, etc.

I would be interested in bulk wheat pasta in the future, and any conceivable way to make fresh fruit available is very welcome. I will look into that and keep all other suggestions in mind as well.
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Old 11-03-2014, 11:36 PM   #16
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I agree with most of the other forum members. The selection of foods is very unhealthy and may be doing more harm than good. Would be tough for them to concentrate with so much junk in their body. I do like the eggs, really is proven to be brain food. How about dried fruits such as banana chips, apricots, etc. Peanuts are inexpensive and are very healthy. Oatmeal and grits I did see in earlier threads and is very helpful in the diets of college kids. Hope this helps and good luck with the kids :)
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Old 01-17-2015, 02:44 PM   #17
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Beans soups potatoes
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Old 02-03-2015, 01:22 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thisismyrofl View Post
I went to Sam's Club and, partially based on recommendations from this thread, bought public-use Quaker oatmeal, Quaker grits, peanut butter, and Country Time lemonade-iced tea mix.



Outright not using the meal plan is unrealistic. However, on campus eating is tremendously overpriced, and the one thousand dollars we're coerced to put into our accounts every semester is, like, 1.2 meals a day. We need to fill in the blanks - and encouraging people to use the kitchen is a good thing to do. Obviously they are advised to buy their own foods as well which may be healthier.

I realize not everything I've named is healthy but I'm taking feedback on ways to improve that. People have shown a very warm response to my kitchen work.



Shoddy sink, low-end Whirlpool stove, Walmart brand microwave, plenty of pots (including several nonstick pans that have been ruined by public use), plates, bowls, cups, mugs, and silverware. Uuhh... Coffee machine, blender, toaster and toaster oven. For vents, we have an oven hood with a fan that doesn't actually expel the air but only recirculates it - setting off the smoke detector is a small concern.

Generally people are good at cleaning their dishes, and there are a few passive-aggressive notes around to encourage that. For spills and messes there is a cleaning crew that comes around every day.
Crumbs! That's positively luxurious compared with the kitchen we had in our hall of residence (what you call your dorm). Large gas fired water heater for making hot drinks, a one ring gas burner and a sink and a spin dryer for laundry. That was it - for 40 women!There was a dining hall but when you get chips/fries with everything (including breakfast sometimes!) it gets a bit boring to say nothing of the excess calories!

Veg are cheap, good for your inside and your outside and make excellent filling tasty soups if you include a can of some sort of beans, chick peas or lentls in the pot and some wholemeal bread (tastier and better for you than pappy white sliced supermarket bread) to eat with it. Canned baked beans on wholemeal toast followed by an orange is a pretty balanced and cheap supper. If you can afford it pop a poached egg on top to add vitamin E and extra protein. Quick and filling too.
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Old 01-15-2016, 12:23 AM   #19
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Maybe organize and schedule some community meals together. Something like wedding soup is delicious and healthy and can be made in the morning and slow cooked all day in a crockpot. Or a general vegetable beef soup or chicken noodle. Serve with a nice crusty loaf of french bread.

And some other basics for a pantry include pasta and veggies (fresh is best, but canned or frozen is fine too). Spaghetti and meatballs is easy and cheap. And also maybe have a taco night with a slow cooker of taco meat (or beans for vegetarians) and they can build their own tacos.

Maybe go to the thrift store and get a cast iron skillet (a large one) for like $5 or so. Can get a crockpot there too.
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