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Old 07-30-2008, 01:47 PM   #91
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I have recently had to tighten my belt but the flip side is I have TIME to cook! I have allready been shopping based on what is on sale and avoiding whatever items are overpriced (I noticed lettuce costing to Pacanis)

The other thing I am doing is trying to stretch my shopping trips more. When the cupboard gets bare I try to figure out what I can make out of the ingredients at hand with little or no shopping required where usually I would have just run to the market and bought more stuff.

This week I had to add two dinners that I did not have planned. One was based on unexpected company and I had nothing ready so some frozen pizzas along with a bag of frozen ravioli and some of those tube muffins amde for a reasonably satisfying if sadly unculinary meal but I was determined not to blow money on take out and those were all things that were languishing in the fridge and the point of the evening was to watch a movie not dinner.

The other night I wanted to use up some of the left-over pork shoulder but not to eat the same thing so I whipped up a pasta salad with some veggies from my garden, oil and vinegar and made pork sandwiches on english muffins as that is the bread I have.

The pasta salad was large and is now serving as lunch.

Normally I would have spend money in both cases in one case on take out and the other on ingredients to make things perfect but in both cases I achieved decent dinners without spending additional cash.

It is really not easy for me to be thrifty when it comes to food but I need to.

The other thing is removing alcohol. I usually drink beer or wine with dinner but I am keeping that for special occassions now.
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Old 07-30-2008, 02:14 PM   #92
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I stock up when things are on special offer in the shops.

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Old 07-30-2008, 02:21 PM   #93
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I worked at a restaurant (15.95 was the cheapest entreÚ, just for scaling) and all of the butter that was on a plate returned to the dish tank was reused.

Illegal and nasty.

Regardless, I'd say they saved some money.
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Old 07-30-2008, 02:22 PM   #94
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Let us know what restaurant that was so we can be sure NEVER to go there!
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Old 07-30-2008, 05:44 PM   #95
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One of the ways I save money in the kitchen is to "protect" the energy that escapes from my stovetop, especially during the hot weather months because our house isn't air-conditioned. What do I mean? This:

I always keep a full kettle of water on one of the burners. After I'm done using a burner, especially if it's been on for a while, I transfer the kettle of room-temperature water to the now turned off burner. The mass of the kettle full of water absorbs the residual heat of the burner. I was skeptical of this tip at first, but it does seem to make a bit of a difference.
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Old 07-30-2008, 07:17 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
One of the ways I save money in the kitchen is to "protect" the energy that escapes from my stovetop, especially during the hot weather months because our house isn't air-conditioned. What do I mean? This:

I always keep a full kettle of water on one of the burners. After I'm done using a burner, especially if it's been on for a while, I transfer the kettle of room-temperature water to the now turned off burner. The mass of the kettle full of water absorbs the residual heat of the burner. I was skeptical of this tip at first, but it does seem to make a bit of a difference.

my dad always thought the small amount of steam left was good for humidity in air. could be.

babe
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Old 07-30-2008, 08:46 PM   #97
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my dad always thought the small amount of steam left was good for humidity in air. could be.

babe
Actually, babe, it's not the steam since the burner is off and there's no pot or anything on it. The mass/water in the tea kettle absorbs the heat from the turned off burner and isn't dissipated into the kitchen. It's that remaining heat that's the challenge.

Around here in the summertime, it's extremely hot and humid. Yesterday the "feels like" was 103 degrees with 90% humidity. Now...in the wintertime, it's a different story.
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:02 PM   #98
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Actually, babe, it's not the steam since the burner is off and there's no pot or anything on it. The mass/water in the tea kettle absorbs the heat from the turned off burner and isn't dissipated into the kitchen. It's that remaining heat that's the challenge.

Around here in the summertime, it's extremely hot and humid. Yesterday the "feels like" was 103 degrees with 90% humidity. Now...in the wintertime, it's a different story.

maybe he only did it in the winter, the heater would dry out the air in closed up house . was near memphis so got pretty cold weather, snow, hail etc.

babe
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Old 08-01-2008, 09:58 AM   #99
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First off, I have to say that I'm blessed with a plethora of terrific supermarkets & farmers markets. I never have to buy pre-measured plastic-wrapped produce.

Second, since I obviously enjoy cooking, I buy the dried herbs & spices I use the most in bulk. Stuff like dried oregano, crushed red pepper flakes, ground coriander, cumin, whole black peppercorns, sea salt, etc. Things that I normally use a lot of that I know will be used up long before they have a chance to lose their essence.

Third - I shop the sales. I don't drive from market to market. I pick the one that has the most of what I want at the time, & that's where I go. And sometimes this enables one to splurge a little. For instance, recently a market had duck on sale. So I bought a duck for approx. $10. Got two meals out of it, so we (it's just two of us) had two duck dinners for $2.50 each. That's a bargain to me.

Last & most important - I both shop & cook WITH A PLAN. "Steamer Clams" for dinner? I buy extra & plan on "Spaghetti with Clam Sauce" the day after next. Big chunks of Turkey Ham on sale? "Western Omelettes with a Green Salad" one day; "Fleetchkie" (sort of a Czech baked ham/noodle/cheese casserole) another. Or maybe some of that ham will make it's way into a main dish Asian "Fried Rice". The leftovers from that chicken I grilled outdoors the other day becomes part of the "Chicken, Smoked Gouda, & Grape" salad on greens supper a couple of days later.

Get the idea? Plus, thinking ahead enables you to make sure you have or pick up any ingredients you need to make the leftover meals "special". The key to using leftovers is not making them look/taste like leftovers.

Even with grocery prices (& everything else) going through the roof, my grocery bill has remained the same, & I think the key to it all is in the planning.
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Old 08-03-2008, 01:01 AM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
First off, I have to say that I'm blessed with a plethora of terrific supermarkets & farmers markets. I never have to buy pre-measured plastic-wrapped produce.

Second, since I obviously enjoy cooking, I buy the dried herbs & spices I use the most in bulk. Stuff like dried oregano, crushed red pepper flakes, ground coriander, cumin, whole black peppercorns, sea salt, etc. Things that I normally use a lot of that I know will be used up long before they have a chance to lose their essence.

Third - I shop the sales. I don't drive from market to market. I pick the one that has the most of what I want at the time, & that's where I go. And sometimes this enables one to splurge a little. For instance, recently a market had duck on sale. So I bought a duck for approx. $10. Got two meals out of it, so we (it's just two of us) had two duck dinners for $2.50 each. That's a bargain to me.

Last & most important - I both shop & cook WITH A PLAN. "Steamer Clams" for dinner? I buy extra & plan on "Spaghetti with Clam Sauce" the day after next. Big chunks of Turkey Ham on sale? "Western Omelettes with a Green Salad" one day; "Fleetchkie" (sort of a Czech baked ham/noodle/cheese casserole) another. Or maybe some of that ham will make it's way into a main dish Asian "Fried Rice". The leftovers from that chicken I grilled outdoors the other day becomes part of the "Chicken, Smoked Gouda, & Grape" salad on greens supper a couple of days later.

Get the idea? Plus, thinking ahead enables you to make sure you have or pick up any ingredients you need to make the leftover meals "special". The key to using leftovers is not making them look/taste like leftovers.

Even with grocery prices (& everything else) going through the roof, my grocery bill has remained the same, & I think the key to it all is in the planning.

I am glad I read your post before I posted. That is what I do. Use leftover ingredients for a completely different meal. GMTA
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