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Old 07-29-2008, 12:05 AM   #21
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Funny, I haven't been to the site except briefly in weeks and what do I stumble onto, tonight's supper.

I think every family in america has a "goulosh" recipe and have yet to find a bad one.

What i made tonight was 2# lean grd beef browned off, 2# mild itialian sausage browned off, 2 28 oz cans of San Marzano crushed tomatoes, a couple cups of chopped onion softened , 6 cloves chopped garlic, about a dozen chopped basil leaves and 16 oz cooked egg noodles [whole foods 365 brand].

Am I full!
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Old 07-29-2008, 11:57 AM   #22
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I hope you all enjoy her Goulash recipe.....I forgot to mention we always served grated parmesan on top too! Now as an adult I freshly grate it vs the container kind.

Did any of you grow up eating Hobo Hash? I love this stuff. Fry up some bacon and crumble it in pieces. While the bacon is frying fry up some potatoes either slice them or dice them, your preference; add diced onion, season with S & P. Beat up some eggs to make scrambled eggs and add the egg mixture to your potatoes. Add in the crumbled bacon and then season with more S & P to taste. Cook till the scrambled eggs are done.

NOTE: Sometimes I'll add sliced scallions to the egg mixture vs putting the diced onion in the potatoes.

You can always subsitute the bacon for sausage or ham.

Although I grew up with this as a breakfast meal I sometimes now make it for dinner.
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Old 07-29-2008, 12:13 PM   #23
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The recipe sound very yummy but its kind or funny how there are several completely different types of goulash.

Growing up Goulash in our family was Ground beef browned with onions then served over mash potatoes with a brown gravy.....sometimes we would serve it over egg noodles.
We also made the recipe you decribed but they just called it maccaroni......

Where does Goulash originate from? Isn't it Sweedish or something? I wonder how it was made traditionally?
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Old 07-29-2008, 12:16 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deelady View Post
The recipe sound very yummy but its kind or funny how there are several completely different types of goulash.

Growing up Goulash in our family was Ground beef browned with onions then served over mash potatoes with a brown gravy.....sometimes we would serve it over egg noodles.
We also made the recipe you decribed but they just called it maccaroni......

Where does Goulash originate from? Isn't it Sweedish or something? I wonder how it was made traditionally?
I think its German. My father was raised in an area they referred to as Germantown and this was originally his mothers recipe but I know mom put her twist on it.
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Old 07-29-2008, 12:24 PM   #25
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Look what I just found....interesting

Goulash is a (sometimes) spicy dish, originally from Hungary, usually made of beef, onions, red peppers, and paprika powder. Its name comes from Hungarian gulyás (pronounced goo-yash), the word for a cattle stockman or herdsman.
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Old 07-29-2008, 05:24 PM   #26
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Goulash is a name "borrowed" from the Eastern European dish described abovin deelady's links. Years ago, I knew it as Hungarian goulash. Surrounding countries have their versions as well. It's a delicious soup/stew based on beef, onions and peppers. I make a stew-like version and serve it over spaetzle.

No one can say how that name got applied to the macaroni/tomato/ground beef dish.
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Old 07-29-2008, 05:54 PM   #27
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I almost fell in the floor laughing while watching Guy Fieri on tv one night when he was visiting some diner up in the Northeast and first encountered "American Chop Suey" - a dish totally foreign to him - not just the name, the dish!

Well, I grew up with it being called Slum Gullion, the lunch ladies at school called it Goulash .... same thing as American Chop Suey.

Hamburger, onion, green bell pepper, diced tomatoes and/or tomato sauce, ground black pepper, large or small macroni ... garlic powder optional.
This is exactly how we make it also. My mom used to call it "Poor Man's Dish", I guess because at the end of the work week that is what we usually had. lol We still love it!

Barb
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Old 07-30-2008, 12:28 AM   #28
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Well, I have traveled a lot in N. America and everywhere I've been, every family has some dish like this. I also do love true Goulash like Hungarian Goulash. These family recipes may be derived from the east european goulashes but they aren't the same. Thankfully.

I love both.
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Old 07-30-2008, 05:43 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deelady View Post
The recipe sound very yummy but its kind or funny how there are several completely different types of goulash.

Growing up Goulash in our family was Ground beef browned with onions then served over mash potatoes with a brown gravy.....sometimes we would serve it over egg noodles.
We also made the recipe you decribed but they just called it maccaroni......

Where does Goulash originate from? Isn't it Sweedish or something? I wonder how it was made traditionally?
Hungarian and it doesn't contain hackfleisch.
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Old 07-30-2008, 07:55 AM   #30
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I use potatoes in mine instead of pasta. The pasta version we always called american chop suey.
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