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Old 06-23-2013, 09:29 AM   #21
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I will only eat steel cut oats and I've never understood why everyone is put off by how long it takes to prepare the quick cooking steel cut oats the old fashioned way, on top of the stove in the morning. It takes less time to cook them than it takes to cook white rice.
Mine is ready in 7 minutes of simmering, and three minutes of resting. No big deal for a superior bowl of goodness.
And 10 minutes isn't long - it's enough time to make and drink a decent pot of tea or coffee to go with the oatmeal or to do your make-up (a mirror in the kitchen might be a useful addition) or you could even get out of bed 10 minutes earlier. Worth losing the ten minutes in bed to have a decent breakfast. It will reward the effort during the day better than 10 extra minutes in bed. Remember the adage for good health - "Breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and supper like a pauper"
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Old 06-23-2013, 11:55 AM   #22
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I already wake up two hours before I have to get to work...that's so I have time to wake up before I must shower or drive. My mornings are strictly autopilot, once I am showered and dressed, I am out the door...too much cat hair for me to stop and sit.

Face it, some people cannot function first thing in the morning, an extra 10 minutes is not going to do anything but allow us to lose sleep, it does not make our mornings better or more organized.
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:22 AM   #23
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Less air pressure at higher altitude, water boils faster. Quick bread need a boost in leavening over 3700' and yeast products may not work the same for you. I had an adjustment coming from a higher to a lower altitude... Look online for high altitude tips for baking, which is what seems to be effected the most.
Water boils faster at high altitudes because it boils at a lower temperature. This is why tea tastes disgusting on aeroplanes!!
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Old 06-25-2013, 10:31 PM   #24
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Water boils faster at high altitudes because it boils at a lower temperature. This is why tea tastes disgusting on aeroplanes!!
It is the lower air pressure that allows the water to boil sooner. Airplanes are pressurized, the low air pressure of altitude does not have any effect on boiling water inside an airplane unless it is an unpressurized cabin.
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:11 PM   #25
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My understanding that the pressure in airplanes are the equivalent of 6,000 - 8,000 feet. That's why there is a condition called jet lag and can effect medical conditions. Enough pressure to create a sea level altitude would cause too much wear and tear on the plane.
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:23 PM   #26
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Jet Lag is caused by time and circadian rhythms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabin_pressurization
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:38 AM   #27
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ATK did a show about cooking steel cut oats where they partial cooked them the night before, and then heated them up the next morning. Supposedily only takes about 10 minutes the next morning. I too love the steel cut, but I don't have the extra cooking time in the morining, so I usually go to Old Fashion.
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Old 09-23-2013, 07:00 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Less air pressure at higher altitude, water boils faster. Quick bread need a boost in leavening over 3700' and yeast products may not work the same for you. I had an adjustment coming from a higher to a lower altitude... Look online for high altitude tips for baking, which is what seems to be effected the most.
Gosh, I never knew that. I knew about boiling water (tea on aeroplanes always tastes disgusting) but didn't realise that it affected bread rising as well. Are cake mixtures affected the same way?
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Old 09-23-2013, 07:09 PM   #29
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Airplanes are pressurized, the low air pressure of altitude does not have any effect on boiling water inside an airplane unless it is an unpressurized cabin.
Well, perhaps you should tell the flight crew that because when I declined a second cup of tea on a long haul flight and commented that the tea tasted dreadful the stewardess explained that it was because the water boils at a lower temp due to the altitude.
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Old 09-23-2013, 08:09 PM   #30
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Yes, cake mixtures are affected. I messed up a couple of cakes before I got it figured out.

As for the tea...the altitude has nothing to do with it if the cabin is pressurized. In an unpressurized cabin the water boils at a lower temp, I would question more where they get their water.
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